Britta Johnson is Canadian musical theatres next great hope

first_imgBritta Johnson, author of the play Life After, says she’s not going on the internet much to avoid getting swept up in the buzz around her. (RICK MADONIK / TORONTO STAR) Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement What’s it like for the young woman at the centre of this creative storm?“It’s crazy, totally crazy and I’m trying not to get swept up in it,” says Johnson. “I’m not going on the internet as much . . . I’m trying to stay in the work and not get ahead of myself.”READ MORE In this moment of unprecedented high profile for Canadian musical theatre, Britta Johnson is one of our great hopes.At the astonishingly young age of 26, she has written the music, book and lyrics of Life After, opening Thursday at the Canadian Stage in a co-production with Musical Stage Company and Yonge Street Theatricals (a commercial musical theatre production company that is also a co-producer of Come From Away).A production of this magnitude is a big deal: it’s the first domestically created musical Canadian Stage has premiered in artistic director Matthew Jocelyn’s nine-year tenure. Mitchell Marcus, Musical Stage Company’s artistic and managing director, calls Johnson’s talent “profound.”center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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POLICE ARREST COMEDIAN MIKE BULLARD AND LAY 3 NEW CHARGES AGAINST HIM

first_imgCanadian media personality Mike Bullard is seen in this undated photo. (Mike Bullard / Facebook) Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter Advertisementcenter_img Advertisement Facebook Comedian Mike Bullard facing three new chargesThree new charges have been laid against Toronto comedian Mike Bullard who has faced past allegations of stalking and harassment.Toronto Police arrested the former talk show host on Wednesday, laying breach of recognizance and attempt to obstruct justice charges. Police declined to elaborate on the nature or circumstances of the charges. READ MORE Police arrest comedian Mike Bullard and lay 3 new charges against himComedian Mike Bullard’s legal troubles worsened this week after Toronto police laid three new charges against him.The former TV and radio talk show host was arrested and charged Wednesday with two counts of fail to comply with previous bail conditions and attempt to obstruct justice.A bail hearing was held Thursday at the College Park courthouse where Ontario Court Justice William Wolski released Bullard on $10,000 bail. READ MORElast_img read more

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PUNK BAND PUP IS GETTING BIGGER AND NONE OF THEM ARE TAKING

first_imgFrom left, Nestor Chumak, Stefan Babcock, Steve Sladkowski and Zach Mykula of PUP will play their biggest hometown show to date at Echo Beach on July 21. RICK MADONIK / TORONTO STAR Twitter Advertisement A stupidly catchy and thoroughly good-humoured collection of shout-along anthems about lead singer/guitarist Stefan Babcock’s running battle with depression, the album is like a big, warm hug from a close friend who’s finally lured you out of your darkened apartment after three days in bed telling you you’re not alone, you’re not the first person to be sad and you will get through this — but also that, from time to time, you need to get over yourself and think about why you’re always so miserable. Advertisement Login/Register With:center_img Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment To call PUP a “relevant distraction” is, admittedly, selling the boisterous Toronto punk quartet a bit short, but it’s a nice turn of phrase nonetheless.Drummer Zack Mykula has hit upon a succinct way of summarizing the band’s growing popular appeal — PUP plays the biggest hometown show of its career at the 5,000-capacity Echo Beach on Sunday, July 21 — as it pertains to this year’s celebrated Morbid Stuff LP, in any case. Facebooklast_img read more

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Ottawa chiefs failing NB FNs children

first_imgAPTN National NewsNew Brunswick’s ombudsman says the federal government is not acting on his recommendations to improve child welfare in First Nations communities.Bernard Richard also says some chiefs are ignoring his pleas to fix the system.last_img

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Protests rise against planned Kanesatake mine clean up

first_imgAPTN National NewsA group of protestors gathered in downtown Montreal Monday.They want to send a clear message to the board of directors of a mining company that they oppose a clean-up project on a former mine site in the traditional territory of Kanesetake Mohawks.APTN National News reporter Danielle Rochette has this story.last_img

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Friends of man killed on construction site take to street

first_imgAPTN National NewsFamily and friends of a young man who died on a constructions site in British Columbia have taken to the streets of Saskatoon to raise awareness of his death.They also want the issue of worker safety talked about.APTN’s Chris Stewart has the story.last_img

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Editor of longrunning First Nation newspaper victim of federal cuts

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe well-known editor of a long-running First Nation media outlet has been laid off, the victim of federal budget cuts.Maurice Switzer worked for Anishinabek News for 14 years before he was let go this past week. Anishinabek News is operated by the communications unit of the Union of Ontario Indians, an organization that saw its core funding drop for 2014.“He (Switzer) was laid off last week due to business conditions.” wrote UOI spokesperson Marci Becking in an email distributed to freelance writers. “This notice was necessary given the recent fiscal attacks against the (Provincial & Territorial Organizations) by the federal government, cutting core funding for such activities as communications.”Becking says Switzer will continue to work with the Union of Ontario Indians as a contract public educator.Started in 1988, Anishinabek News was originally a newspaper but published its last printed edition in March of 2014. With Switzer’s departure, Marci Becking says she is Anishinabek News’ sole employee.Switzer wasn’t available to comment.last_img read more

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AFN wants independent probe of Winnipeg police paramedics in Tina Fontaine case

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Assembly of First Nations is calling for a full investigation into the actions of Winnipeg police and paramedics who came into contact with 15 year-old Tina Fontaine before her murder.AFN Alberta regional Chief Cameron Alexis, a former RCMP officer, said it’s “unfathomable” Fontaine managed to pass through the hands of both police and paramedics shortly before she disappeared.Fontaine’s body was pulled wrapped in plastic from the Red River on Aug. 17. Police say she was murdered.“It is my opinion that policies of the Winnipeg police service may have been breached and we call upon an independent police service or a Serious Incident Response Team to conduct a thorough internal investigation on this very serious matter,” said Alexis, who was an RCMP officer for 23 years. “A thorough investigation must commence immediately and the police officers in question may need to be released from duties.”Despite being named in a missing persons report, Fontaine was briefly detained and released by Winnipeg police officers on Aug. 8 during a spot-check. The driver of the car carrying was also detained and charged with impaired driving.Later that same day, Fontaine was found passed-out by a passerby in an alley. Paramedics treated Fontaine and took her to a city hospital where she remained for about four hours.Fontaine was then released into the care of a child care worker who didn’t know the address of her caretaker. The 15 year-old eventually escaped the custody of a child care worker and vanished.The Winnipeg Police said it was a field trainer and a trainee who came into contact with Fontaine and they have both been put on restricted duties while they undergo an internal investigation.“I am offended and hurt that we have lost another child to a system that is failing our people.  This is yet one more compelling reason for a national public commission of inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls,” said Alexis.news@aptn.ca@APTNNewslast_img read more

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Ontario provides 2 million for regional youth unit in support of Attawapiskat

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Ontario government said it would be providing $2 million to fund a Youth Regional Coordination Unit for the Mushkegowuk Council, which includes Attawapiskat as one of its seven member First Nations from the province’s James Bay region.Ontario’s Minister of Health Eric Hoskins issued a statement announcing the funding following a visit Wednesday to Attawapiskat, a fly-in Cree First Nation currently in the grip of a suicide crisis after recording 11 suicide attempts in a 24-hour period on Saturday.The statement said the unit would start deploying Wednesday through the province’s Emergency Medical Assistance Team (EMAT)The statement said the money would go toward additional emergency health care personnel and support staff to help Attawapiskat through its crisis. The statement said the deployment would provide 24-7 mental health support along with evening and night nursing clinical support. The staff would also include four psychological health workers, five nurses, two security staff, one communications officer and one incident manager.“This is a very tragic situation and our hearts go out to the people and families affected,” said Hoskins, in the statement. “Ontario is strongly committed to working together with the Attawapiskat community and with First Nations in Ontario alongside our federal partners.”The statement said the province decide to provide the emergency funding following an assessment by its EMAT unit.The Ontario government and Attawapiskat’s administration also plan to hold a forum to hash out a long-term plan to support the Cree First Nation “to ensure the people of Attawapiskat—particularly youth—feel safe, respected and supported.”new@aptn.ca@APTNNewslast_img read more

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PM Trudeau agrees to meet with Attawapiskat chief in Ottawa

first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA—Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has invited Attawapiskat Chief Bruce Shisheesh to meet in Ottawa about the suicide crisis that has gripped his community.“I am deeply concerned with the ongoing situation in your community, and with the urgency and gravity of this in mind, I am unhesitatingly willing to accept your offer to meet,” wrote Trudeau in a letter dated May 5.The prime minister’s letter is in response to one Shisheesh penned on May 3 inviting Trudeau to meet to discuss the suicide crisis that has gripped his community for more than a month.“I am writing to you today on a matter of life and death,” Shisheesh wrote in his letter. “Your intervention is immediately required.”In early April, Shisheesh and the Attawapiskat council declared a state of emergency because of the high number of young people who have either attempted to take their own lives or discussed it.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s letter to Attawapiskat Chief Bruce Shisheesh.Download (PDF, Unknown)The federal government responded by providing mental health workers and Minister of Indigenous Affairs Carolyn Bennett flew to the community to meet with a youth council, elders and leadership.Bennett also promised to fund a youth centre and provide more money for programs.“As Minister of Youth and Prime Minister, I am agonized to see the number of suicide attempts by young people in Attawapiskat, and I wish to express my sincere support for the families and the community members who are affected by this tragic situation,” said Trudeau, in the letter.Pressure to sit down with Shisheesh mounted after Trudeau flew to Shoal Lake 40 last week for a tour of the community. Chief Erwin Redsky told APTN National News  he encouraged the prime minister to meet with Shisheesh to talk about the crisis.According to the letter, no date has been set.“My office will very shortly be in contact with you in order to arrange a meeting in Ottawa at a mutually convenient time.”news@aptn.ca@APTNNewslast_img read more

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Committee looks at ways to help communities on financial track

first_imgTodd Lamirande APTN National News142 First Nations are in some type of default management.That includes co-managers or third party management.A House of Commons committee is currently looking at preventing communities from going into default.tlamirande@aptn.calast_img

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Timeline for Boeing and Bombardier dispute over the CSeries

first_imgMONTREAL – The timeline of the commercial dispute between Boeing and Bombardier:– April 27: The Chicago giant asks the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) to take action against Bombardier’s business practices.– May 18: The Department of Commerce confirms the beginning of an investigation. Ottawa replies by questioning a military order from Boeing for new Super Hornet jet fighters.– June 9: ITC gives the go-ahead for Washington to continue its investigation into CSeries sales south of the border.– 28 June: At the request of Boeing, the Department of Commerce agrees to delay the disclosure of its preliminary decision on possible punitive duties by two months, until Sept. 25.– Sept. 4: Boeing International Division President Marc Allen says the U.S. giant has no intention to back down and withdraw its complaint against Bombardier.– Sept. 5: British Prime Minister Theresa May, in a telephone conversation with U.S. President Donald Trump, pleads in favour of the Quebec manufacturer, which has more than 4,000 employees in Belfast, Northern Ireland.– Sept. 13: Demonstration in downtown Montreal of hundreds of union members in the aeronautics sector to denounce the Boeing approach.– Sept. 20: Bombardier workers in Toronto walk off the job to support company’s battle against Boeing.– Sept. 24: JetBlue becomes latest U.S. airline to write to the ITC urging it to deny Boeing’s petition, saying tariffs on the aircraft would harm competition and result in higher airfares.– Sept. 26: Department of Commerce announces a hefty 219 per cent preliminary countervailing duty on CSeries exports to the U.S., pending a final determination in February.– Oct. 4: Department of Commerce is expected to announce preliminary anti-dumping duties, but that could be extended.– December: Department of Commerce will release its final determinations.– February: ITC will make its final ruling, imposes any final duties.last_img read more

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Time for change on harassment including on Parliament Hill minister

first_imgOTTAWA – There is nothing new about sexual harassment on Parliament Hill, says Employment Minister Patty Hajdu, but it is time to get serious about supporting its victims and stopping it from happening in the first place.“We talk a lot about getting women into politics and if we can’t actually protect the women staffers in our own workplaces, we have a long ways to go,” the Liberal minister said Monday after she opened the debate on proposed legislation to support safe federal workplaces.“This isn’t something that’s a brand new phenomenon,” she told a news conference. “What we’re saying is actually what women have been saying, which is ‘time’s up,’ that it’s time to take action, and that we have the tools to do so.”The legislation, introduced last fall, is aimed at giving workers and employers a clear course of action to better deal with allegations of bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct.Later Monday, MPs agreed with a motion tabled by NDP House leader Ruth Ellen Brosseau to fast-track the legislation, known as Bill C-65, sending it straight to the House of Commons human resources committee for further study.The proposed changes would merge separate labour standards for sexual harassment and violence, subjecting them to the same scrutiny and dispute resolution process, which could mean bringing in an outside investigator to review allegations.The proposed rules, which also apply to banks, transportation, telecommunications and other federally regulated industries, would enforce strict privacy rules to protect victims of harassment or violence.Once passed, the legislation would also allow anyone unhappy with how a dispute is being handled to complain to the labour minister, who could step in to investigate and order sanctions for employers.The new rules would also — for the first time — bring parliamentary staff under the protection of the Canada Labour Code.Staffers would also have access to a neutral third party to examine their complaints, so that they are not forced to rely upon the MP or senator who employs them, especially if that person is also the alleged abuser.That aspect of the legislation has taken on increased significance as the #MeToo movement has reached Parliament Hill, including allegations against Liberal MP Kent Hehr, who resigned from cabinet last week pending an investigation.Last week also saw Patrick Brown step down as leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservatives, months ahead of a provincial election, following a CTV News report that included an allegation of sexual misconduct stemming from his time as a Conservative MP.And then Monday, a report by Maclean’s magazine said the federal Conservative party was aware of an allegation of sexual assault against former Ontario MP Rick Dykstra, yet allowed him to remain on the ballot in the 2015 campaign.Dykstra, who left his post as president of the Ontario Progressive Conservatives over the weekend, has not returned a request for comment.The Liberals asked the opposition parties for the debate on Bill C-65 last week, before the allegations against Brown came to light.“It’s a culture where people who are victims of harassment or sexual violence do not feel safe to bring those complaints forward,” Hajdu said Monday in the House of Commons.Conservative MP Michelle Rempel responded with an impassioned speech on how what life can be like for women on the Hill, where many influential people, often with big egos, work long hours with others in precarious positions.She added that “for all the talk of feminism,” women at all levels are still used as “photo op props” and remain vulnerable to abuse.“We are still given hugs and cheek kisses that linger a bit too long,” she said. “To fit in, we still laugh at the lewd jokes and maybe even tell one ourselves, to be considered safe to socialize with and one of the boys.”She said women are shamed for standing up for themselves as well as for choosing to stay silent.“These things are used to control us, to demean us, and to silence us.”Rempel urged everyone who witnesses harassment to speak up, rather than forcing victims to do it themselves.“We cannot be bystanders any longer,” she said, calling on the government to require everyone — from volunteers and interns to MPs and ministers — to take training on how to prevent sexual harassment from happening in the first place.Of the report on how her own party handled allegations against Dykstra, she said: “Those people should be ashamed of themselves.”— Follow @smithjoanna on Twitterlast_img read more

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Swiss giant Novartis to buy USbased AveXis in 87B deal

first_imgGENEVA – Swiss pharmaceuticals giant Novartis says it has agreed to buy the U.S.-based gene therapy company AveXis Inc. for $8.7 billion, part of its goal to become a leader in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.The two companies say their respective boards have voted unanimously to approve the deal, to be paid for through cash and short-term borrowing.The tender offer for $218 per share announced Monday marks a whopping 88 per cent premium from AveXis’ closing price in Nasdaq trading on Friday.Basel, Switzerland-based Novartis called the deal set to close in mid-2018 a “financially attractive acquisition with multi-billion dollar peak sales potential” even if it isn’t expected to add to core operating income until 2020.The lead AveXis gene therapy candidate is for spinal muscular atrophy Type 1, which Novartis called the top genetic cause of death in infants, in which “nine out of 10 infants do not live to their second birthday or are permanently ventilator dependent.”The top executive for Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Paul Hudson, said the deal to bring in AveXis “would support both our ambition to be a leader in neurodegenerative diseases and our Neuroscience franchise priorities to strengthen our position in devastating pediatric neurological diseases such as SMA.”last_img read more

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Pilots says Boeing didnt disclose jets new control feature

first_imgBoeing didn’t tell airline pilots about features of a new flight-control system in its 737 MAX that reportedly is a focus of the investigation into last month’s deadly crash in Indonesia, according to pilots who fly the jet in the U.S.Pilots say they were not trained in new features of an anti-stall system in the aircraft that differ from previous models of the popular 737.The automated system is designed to help pilots avoid raising the plane’s nose too high, which can cause the plane to stall. It automatically pushes the nose of the plane down.But if that nose-down command is triggered by faulty sensor readings — as suspected in the Lion Air crash — pilots can struggle to control the plane, which can go into a dive and perhaps crash, according to a Boeing safety bulletin and safety regulators.The bulletin included new details on how to stop a runaway series of events from leading to a crash, pilots say.“It is something we did not have before in any of our training. It wasn’t in our books. American didn’t have it,” said Dennis Tajer, a 737 pilot and spokesman for the pilots union at American Airlines. “Now I have to wonder what else is there?”The president of the pilots union at Southwest Airlines, Jon Weaks, told The Wall Street Journal, “We’re pissed that Boeing didn’t tell the companies, and the pilots didn’t get notice.”The MAX is the newest version of the twin-engine Boeing 737. More than 200 have been delivered to airlines worldwide, including American, Southwest and United.Southwest spokeswoman Brandy King said the new automated manoeuvring system was not included in the operations manual for MAX models. American and United did not immediately respond to requests for comment.Boeing Chairman and CEO Dennis Muilenburg said Tuesday that the Chicago-based company remains confident the MAX is a safe airplane. He said Boeing did not withhold operating details from airlines and flight crews.“We ensure that we provide all of the information that is needed to safely fly our airplanes,” Muilenburg told Fox Business News. He said Boeing bulletins to airlines and pilots “point them back to existing flight procedures” to handle the kind of sensor problem suspected in last month’s crash.The Federal Aviation Administration issued an emergency directive last week to airlines, telling them to update cockpit manuals to include instructions for how pilots can adjust flight controls under certain conditions.“The FAA will take further action if findings from the accident investigation warrant,” the agency said in a statement Tuesday.On Oct. 29, Lion Air Flight 610 plunged into the Java Sea shortly after takeoff from Jakarta. All 189 people on board were killed.John Cox, a former 737 pilot and now a safety consultant to airlines, said Boeing’s steps since the crash “have been exactly correct. They have increased pilot awareness, they have reminded them of the proper procedure to disable (the automatic nose-down action), which stops the problem.”Indonesian investigators say that the Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX 8 experienced malfunctions with sensors that indicate the angle of the nose on four recent flights, including the fatal one.The Wall Street Journal reported that U.S. and Indonesian investigators are increasingly focusing on the way that the plane’s automated control systems interact. They are also questioning whether the FAA and Boeing adequately analyzed potential hazards if the systems malfunction and send faulty data to the plane’s computers, according to the newspaper.Shares of Boeing Co. ended Tuesday down $7.52, or 2.1 per cent, at $349.51 after falling to $342.04 earlier in the day.___David Koenig can be reached at http://twitter.com/airlinewriterDavid Koenig, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Delays at Sturgeon Refinery add to Alberta heavy oil price discount woes

first_imgCompanies in this story: (TSX:CNQ)The Canadian Press CALGARY — A new refinery touted as part of the solution to Alberta’s oversupply of heavy oil likely won’t begin processing oilsands bitumen until year-end, several months later than expected.That means 80,000 barrels per day of diluted bitumen that would have been delivered to the $9.7-billion Sturgeon Refinery near Edmonton is instead joining the queue to be placed on overcrowded pipelines leaving the province.Ian MacGregor, CEO of co-owner North West Refining, Inc., says multiple equipment failures have prevented the startup of the part of the refinery designed to break down heavy, sticky bitumen into an upgraded oil that can then be converted into consumer products.He says the refinery contains some 7,000 pieces of equipment and getting them all to operate in concert is taking more time than expected, with the latest setback involving a heat exchanger that was apparently damaged during installation.Sturgeon, the first new refinery built in Alberta in more than 30 years, was completed 12 months ago and has since been producing diesel from synthetic crude upgraded at an Alberta oilsands mine.MacGregor says the refinery is benefiting as high discounts on prices on stranded Alberta heavy oil have also begun to affect light oil and synthetic oil, leading to its feedstock costing as much as US$30 per barrel less than usual.He says the refinery is currently producing between 35,000 and 40,000 barrels per day of diesel.“I think we’re going to be running on bitumen by the end of the year,” he said in an interview.“It will take a while to come up to full capacity because as we put bitumen into it, we’ll find other problems.”The refinery is a joint venture of North West Refining and Canadian Natural Resources Ltd., which is to provide 25 per cent of its bitumen feedstock. The rest is to come from the government-owned Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission.last_img read more

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Vigilance the watchword for pot users investors executives at CanadaUS border

first_imgWASHINGTON — Marijuana has been legal in Canada for a month already but immigration lawyers and cannabis executives say when it comes to getting into the United States, the worst may be yet to come.As Canadians get used to the fact that cannabis is no longer against the law in their country, some experts fear they will forget the perils that past and present marijuana use still poses for those seeking to cross the Canada-U.S. border.Henry Chang, a Toronto-based immigration lawyer, says he’s bracing for a spike in cases of people who end up being banned outright from entering the U.S. for owning up to using pot.Customs and Border Protection officials have made it clear that anyone who admits to using marijuana prior to Oct. 17, the day it became legal in Canada, could be banned from entering the country.And Chang says U.S. law can still keep out anyone deemed to be a drug abuser or addict, or who is diagnosed with a mental disorder with a history of related harmful behaviour — including alcoholism or marijuana use.Investors and employees in the cannabis industry, too, are on shaky ground — one U.S. executive says the risk of being banned for life from crossing the border has become a major preoccupation for his Canadian colleagues.“The bigger issue is people thinking the slate has been wiped clean,” Chang said in an interview.“I think we’re going to start seeing more people getting banned, not because of them smoking marijuana after Oct. 17, but just because they think they have nothing to hide and they blurt out that they smoked marijuana when they were 18. That’s going to happen, because people just don’t understand that it’s still barred.”U.S. border authorities initially warned that any Canadian who gave off a whiff of pot involvement — from using the drug to working or investing in the industry —risked being banned or denied entry. They later softened that stance, saying industry workers would generally be deemed admissible so long as they were travelling for reasons unrelated to their work.Some Canadians travelling to MJBizCon, a major cannabis industry conference last week in Las Vegas, faced additional scrutiny at various border screening points.U.S. border staff at the airport in Toronto steered several attendees through a secondary screening process, said Global Public Affairs’ senior vice president Rod Elliot, who advises various clients in the cannabis industry.Elliot said he was one of roughly 25 people who were selected for additional screening — several of whom missed their flights, including him. He travelled to Las Vegas the next morning without incident.“There has been challenges for people going across the border,” he said. “It’s pretty clear that the border officials are targeting people attending this conference.”Len Saunders, a Canadian immigration lawyer based in Blaine, Wash., told a similar story about a group of would-be attendees and investors who were travelling through the airport in Vancouver. One of them, however, was part of a tour of a Vegas-based production facility in which he’d recently become an investor, arranged by his financial adviser.That investor was unaware of the risks he faced crossing the border, and must now contend with having been banned from entering the U.S., Saunders said.In the U.S., many in the industry — still hamstrung by the fact marijuana remains a controlled substance at the federal level, making it all but impossible to effectively obtain financing and other essential services — are hanging their hopes on bipartisan legislation aimed at ensuring states are protected from U.S. government interference.The bill, unveiled earlier this year by Republican Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado and Democrat counterpart Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, is beginning to get traction in the wake of a strong Democratic showing in the midterms, said Derek Peterson, chief executive of California-based pot producer Terra Tech Corp.“That, I think, will be the answer to legalization, and we will start to see some attention paid to that” in the new year, Peterson said.“I think (Republicans) now understand that most of the constituents in the U.S. want to have some sort of federal regulation, a tax-and-regulate program, rather than just kind of leaving it with the black market, for all practical purposes.”In the meantime, Chang has some common-sense advice for anyone who might have reason to be anxious entering the U.S.“Don’t dress like a hippie, don’t smell like marijuana, because then the questions get asked,” he said. “If you are asked the question, your only option is to refuse to answer, say it’s irrelevant, you refuse to answer — you’ll get into trouble, they’ll detain you, you’ll get sent back to Canada, but at least you don’t have anything on the record saying you engaged in controlled-substance use.”— With files from Armina Ligaya in Toronto— Follow James McCarten on Twitter @CdnPressStyleJames McCarten, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Second Cup franchisees file lawsuit against coffee chain over debt ad fund

first_imgMONTREAL — A group of current and past Second Cup Ltd. franchisees has filed a lawsuit against the Canadian coffee chain.The suit filed earlier this month in the Superior Court of Quebec alleges the company misused a franchisee-funded advertising reserve and forced franchisees to acquire debt to fund equipment that failed to boost sales — among other things.None of the claims have been proven in court.The suit stems from an original claim by one Second Cup franchisee against the company that eight other franchisees later asked to join.Second Cup filed a document last week arguing the additional plaintiffs should be treated separately from the first claim as “each claim is extremely fact-specific.”The coffee chain and its lawyer declined to comment.A company spokesperson said the company does not comment on active court matters, particularly if they are at a very early stage of the proceedings. Companies in this story: (TSX:SCU)The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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