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University of California decides against raising instate tuition

first_img KUSI Newsroom Posted: April 26, 2018 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — In-state University of California students got a financial reprieve Thursday, with the system opting to forego a vote on a proposed tuition hike in favor of pushing the state for more funding.“Raising tuition is always a last resort and one we take very seriously,” UC President Janet Napolitano said. “We will continue to advocate with our students, who are doing a tremendous job of educating legislators about the necessity of adequately funding the university to ensure UC remains a world-class institution and engine of economic growth for our state.”The Board of Regents had been expected to consider a 2.7 percent boost in base tuition. While that vote will no longer happen, the regents could revisit the issue “depending on the outcome of budget negotiations in Sacramento.”UC officials said they will look to secure an additional $140 million in state funding above what was already proposed for the coming year in the governor’s budget proposal.The announcement echoed a decision announced last week by California State University Chancellor Timothy White, who said the CSU would also focus on lobbying the state for additional funds rather than pursuing a tuition hike.“In light of California’s strong economy, California’s students and their families should not be saddled with additional financial burden to attain public higher education,” White said. “We will continue to make the case to lawmakers, who represent all Californians, that an educated citizenry should be at the top of the state’s highest priorities.”In January, the UC Board of Regents approved a 3.5 percent increase in non-resident supplemental tuition, taking it from $28,014 in 2017-18 to $28,992 for 2018-19, a $978 increase. Board members said at the time that the increase could be eliminated if adequate state funding is secured. KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter April 26, 2018 University of California decides against raising in-state tuitionlast_img read more

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The rise and fall of Anil Ambani Heres how things became worse

first_img Ericsson case: Anil Ambani guilty of contempt, directed to pay Rs 453 crore or face 3 months jail After the death of his father Dhirubhai Ambani, Reliance Industries was divided into two in 2005 with Mukesh Ambani, his elder brother, getting control of the flagship oil-refining and petrochemicals business. Anil got hold of newer businesses for example power generation, financial services and telecom business, having a high potential of growth back then. From this very moment, Anil Ambani-led companies started borrowing heavily to diversify and create a conglomerate that could generate as much wealth as Mukesh’s refining firm Reliance Industries created. IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:01/0:58Loaded: 0%0:01Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-0:57?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Anil Ambani is facing worst time of his business career.Credit: ReutersEleven years ago, Anil Ambani was one of the wealthiest men in the world. As per Forbes valuation, the younger son of industrialist Dhirubhai Ambani was listed as the world’s sixth richest person in 2008. Just after a decade, he is now struggling to save his reputation. On Friday, the National Company Law Appellate Tribunal (NCLAT) refused a plea seeking the tribunal to direct a group of lenders led by State Bank of India (SBI) to release Rs 260 crore of tax refunds to Reliance Communications. Notably, the amount is due to be paid to Ericsson for which the Swedish multinational networking and telecommunications company has approached the Supreme Court (SC).The judgment is a huge setback for Anil Ambani-led Reliance Communications. As per the directions of the apex court, RCom is bound to pay Ericsson its remaining dues of Rs 453 crore by Tuesday to ensure that Ambani doesn’t go to jail. RCom has cleared partial dues of Rs 118 crore of the total Rs 571 crore. How did one of the world’s wealthiest men come this to the sorry state? Let’s find out.center_img Close Anil Ambani’s RCom was doing fairly good till 2010, the year a non-compete clause between him and his elder brother was scrapped which kept Mukesh Ambani out of telecom business. In the cut-throat competition in the growing telecom market, RCom kept borrowing to remain in the fight. RCom started losing position as the No.2 carrier in the telecom market which was further accelerated when Mukesh Ambani-led Reliance Jio entered the market and completely disrupted it with free calls and data. Today, Anil Ambani is facing arrest due to non-payment to the Swedish telecom equipment maker. RCom offered to settle the case but since last year, things have not appeared to reach any conclusion. Only, time will tell Anil Ambani’s fate.last_img read more

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Headon collision kills truck driver

first_imgRoad Accident logoA truck driver was killed in a head-on collision between two trucks in Agran area of Baraigram upazila of Natore district on Tuesday night.The deceased driver is Belal Hossain, reports UNB.The accident took place around 8:00pm as two trucks had collided head-on, leaving a truck driver injured, said Baraigram police station officer-in-charge GM Shamsun Nur.The victim was taken to Rajshahi Medical College Hospital where the doctors declared him dead, he said.last_img

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PM Hasina says AL will build poverty free Sonar Bangla

first_imgPM HasinaPrime minster and Awami League (AL) president Sheikh Hasina on Saturday greeted the countrymen on the occasion of AL’s 70th founding anniversary saying the party along with the people would build a hunger-poverty free, happy and prosperous Sonar Bangla as dreamt by Bangabandhu.“On this day I recall with respect the greatest Bengali of all time, Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman. I recall Awami League’s founder president Maulana Abdul Hamid Khan Bhasani and general secretary Shamsul Haque. I recall with respect Huseyn Shaheed Suhrawardy,” she said in a message issued marking the anniversary.She recalled with respect the four national leaders, and all martyrs of struggles for freedom, Liberation War and struggles for democracy and all leaders and workers of AL who had embraced martyrdom to turn the party into the largest organization of masses.The AL president greeted the party leaders and workers and supporters on the occasion alongside the countrymen.“Awami League has a glorious role in every major achievement of the nation. People are the source of power of Awami League. In future Awami League along with the people will build a poverty-hunger free, happy, prosperous and developed Sonar Bangladesh as envisioned by the Father of the Nation,” she said.She recalled that the party was established on 23 June in 1949 at “Rose Garden” on KM Das Lane in Dhaka and said the history of the AL is closely linked with the people’s struggle for realizing their rights.“The Language Movement in 1952, the Jukta Front election in 1954, the anti-Ayub movement in 1962, the restoration of communal harmony after the 1964 riot, the six-point movement in 1966 and the mass upsurge in 1969- all took place under the leadership of the AL,” she said.In the general elections of 1970, the people of Bangladesh gave an absolute majority to the Awami League and in continuation to that, Bangabandhu on 7 March in 1971 declared that “This time the struggle is for our freedom. This time the struggle is for our independence” the prime minister mentioned.She continued that on the Black Night of 25 March in 1971, the Pakistani occupation forces swooped on the people and the history’s most brutal genocide began.Sheikh Hasina said Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman had declared the country’s independence using the then EPR wireless in the first hour of 26 March, she said.Soon after the declaration of independence by Bangabandhu, Pakistani occupation forces arrested him and sent to West Pakistan jail, she added.The premier said the country had achieved its final victory on 16 December in 1971 following the Liberation War conducted under the AL government formed at Mujibnagar in Meherpur district on 10 April.After independence when Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman was busy building the nation, the assassins killed Bangabandhu and most of his family members on the fateful night of 15 August in 1975.Subsequently on 3 November in 1975 the four national leaders were killed in prison to make Awami League leaderless.The prime minister said there were national and international conspiracies to destroy the AL, but those intrigues went in vain.She said after a long struggle to establish democracy, the AL returned to power in 1996 and then the AL ran the country successfully from 1996 to 2001.Sheikh Hasina said the AL government turned food-deficit Bangladesh into a food-surplus country, signed the Ganges water sharing treaty with India and inked the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) peace treaty.Waging a movement against the BNP-Jamaat government and facing all conspiracies of the caretaker government, the Awami League was once again voted to power in 2008, she added.In the last 10 and an half years, she said the Awami League government carried out tremendous development in all sectors, specially agriculture, education, health, communication, information technology, infrastructure, power, rural economic growth and diplomacy.“Bangladesh is now a role model of development in the world. The country’s GDP growth stood at 7.86 per cent last year and this year it will be above 8 per cent. The people’s income and purchasing capacity have increased. Our per capita income has increased to US $1,909,” she noted.The premier said the income of over five crore people enhanced to middle income level from the lower income status and the country achieved self-sufficiency in food production.“At present the country’s around one-fourth people have been brought under the social safety net while 93 per cent people are getting electricity facilities,” Sheikh Hasina said, adding different development data including the health facilities for the rural people who can get 30 types of medicines at free of cost.She said Bangladesh has launched Bangabandhu Satellite-1 into the space as the 57th country in the world.The Awami League government, she said, has been implementing massive programmes for infrastructural development including construction of roads, bridges, flyovers, alleviated expressway and railways.Construction works of metro-rail in Dhaka is underway while the Padma Multipurpose Bridge is being constructed with country’s own finance, she added.The premier said her government is pledge-bound to turn Bangladesh into a prosperous country by implementing ‘Vision 2021’ and ‘Vision 2041’.She called upon the people irrespective of party affiliations and opinions to come forward to continue this trend of development.last_img read more

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Singing Pastors Celebrate the Legacy of Baltimore Talented Teen Electrocuted in Druid

first_imgOn May 5th 2006, 14-year-old Deanna Camille Green died from electrocution when a ball field fence she was stretching on in Baltimore’s Druid Hill Park, came in contact with an underground power line while she was playing a game with a Christian softball league. Almost 11 years to the day of that tragedy, her family intends to provide a ray of hope for worthy students who aspire to attend college to study performing arts. Former Baltimore Colt Defensive lineman Anthony “Bubba” Green and Nancy Arrington-Green, founders of Deanna’s Lyric, Foundation for the Arts, Inc., are presenting a gospel concert entitled: “Sing Pastor, Sing!Deanna Camille GreenThe event will take place Saturday May 6th, 2017 from 4pm to 6pm at Milford Mill United Methodist Church 915 Milford Mill Rd, Pikesville, MD  21208 and will be hosted by Fox 45 news anchor Kia Jackson and Ernestine Jones of WEAA radio. “Deanna’s Lyric, Foundation for the Arts, a 501 C (3) organization was founded to commemorate Deanna’s life. Prior to her untimely death the talented “lyric soprano” was looking forward to attending the Carver Center for Arts and Technology, a Baltimore County magnate school, in fall of 2006.      The event will feature several local church pastors and other guest performers in a gospel concert. Among the Pastors scheduled to participate are Dr. Robert J. Anderson, Jr., of Colonial Baptist Church, Tamba Giles and the Williams Brothers, Rev. Dr. Alvin Gwynn, Sr., Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Baltimore, Bishop R. Alonzo Jones and Rev. Terry D. Streeter, Mount Pleasant Baptist Church, Washington D.C. There also will be a performance by the Milford Mill Academy Choir.      According to Anthony Green, “Each academic year, our goal is to award four $2500 scholarships to four college bound students majoring in the Performance Arts.” Nancy Green said of Deanna, “it was her passion and desire to share her God given talent!  The mission of the foundation is to ensure that Deanna’s angelic, lyrical voice will continue to be heard through the lives, voices and talents of other young performing artists.”  State regulations passed by the Maryland Legislature in her name deemed the “Deanna Camille Green law,” require utility businesses to conduct scans each year in Maryland’s major cities to mitigate the kind of stray contact voltage that caused Deanna’s death. Kristen A. Anderson, a graduate of Salisbury University and a former Afro- American Newspaper Internlast_img read more

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The next interface Electrical fields MGC3130 and your hand w Video

first_img Citation: The next interface: Electrical fields, MGC3130, and your hand (w/ Video) (2012, November 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-interface-electrical-fields-mgc3130-video.html According to the company, the MGC3130 can enable 3-D gesture recognition with power consumption as low as 150 microwatts in its active sensing state. More information: www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/ … px?dDocName=en560048 © 2012 Phys.org (Phys.org)—Microchip Technology has been working in the “non-contact user interface” space, which is translating into gesture control over your next computing device. The company is using electrical fields to sense hand movements. They have announced a controller that transmits an electrical signal and calculates the three-coordinate position of a hand based on the disturbances to the field the hand creates. Chandler, Arizona, based Microchip Technology, in looking at electrical fields to sense hand movements, issued this week’s announcement of “the world’s first electrical field based 3-D gesture controller, the MGC3130.” The new controller offers low-power, hand position tracking with gesture recognition. Its two promoted advantages are low cost and low power. The company is offering a development kit. A gesture library was constructed using algorithms that learned from how different people make the same movements, to be applied toward device functions such as .point, click, zoom, or scroll. Ten gestures were programmed into the device with recognition based on Markov models. According to the company, “the chip provides developers the flexibility to utilize pre-filtered electrode signals for additional functionality in their applications.”Gesture-recognition technology is familiar to those using game consoles, but the concept of gesture recognition could now become more mainstream with users of desktops, laptops, or smartphones, making use of gesture-control hovering motions. Microchip Technology said that it is already working with product manufacturers to implement user-input controls.The MGC3130 will cost $2.26 each in high volumes and volume production is expected in April 2013.center_img MGC3130’s design and configurable power modes represent the lowest power consumption of any 3-D sensing technology, says Microchip’s creators, and up to 90 percent lower than camera-based gesture systems.Microchip Technology is aiming its technology toward a range of devices; an easy vision of how it would translate into end use would be hand gesture recognition for smartphones and notebooks. The company said its chip will offer interaction with both mobile devices and consumer electronics. Its list of potential devices, for example, includes electronic readers, remote controls and game controllers. NEC unveils gesture controlling device This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Kolkatas centuryold club gutted in early morning fire

first_imgKolkata: A century-old athletic club in central Kolkata’s maidan area was reduced to ashes after a fire broke out on Monday morning, police said. The cause of the blaze, which erupted at Wari Athletic Club around 5.40 am, is yet to be ascertained, a senior officer of Kolkata Police said, adding, four fire tenders were pressed into service. The fire was brought under control by 6.10 am, he said. “It can be a result of a short circuit. We are trying to find out the actual reason,” the officer said. An attendant of the club suffered minor injuries due to the blaze and has been taken to hospital, police said. “The fire damaged the entire club tent. The trophies, kits of players, documents, television sets… everything was gutted,” Wari Athletic Club’s general secretary Prabir Chakraborty told PTI.last_img read more

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Rep Lower announces July office hours

first_img Categories: Lower News State Rep. Jim Lower of Cedar Lake today announced his July in-district office hours schedule.Rep. Lower will be available at the following times and locations:Thursday, July 27 from 6 to 7 p.m. at Margo’s Family Restaurant, 215 S. Lafayette St. in Greenville; andSaturday, July 29 from 10 to 11 a.m. at Wendy’s, 1495 Wright Ave. in Alma.“Being accessible and listening to the concerns of residents is the most rewarding aspect of my job as a legislator,” Rep. Lower said. “I encourage anyone with ideas, issues, or questions pertaining to state government to join me.”No appointments are necessary. Those unable to meet during the scheduled times may contact Rep. Lower’s office at (517) 373-0834 or via email at JamesLower@house.mi.gov. 05Jul Rep. Lower announces July office hourslast_img read more

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Dean Stoneback The US Society of Cable Telecommuni

first_imgDean StonebackThe US Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers (SCTE) has named Dean Stoneback as senior director of engineering.Stoneback previously served as senior technical marketing manager with Arris and as senior manager, systems engineering, access networks for Motorola. At the SCTE he will be responsible for the development of standards, recommended practices and training material, reporting to Daniel Howard, senior vice-president and chief technology officer.“Throughout his career, Dean Stoneback’s innovative approach, his commitment to technical excellence and his collaborative spirit have contributed to the growth of our industry,” said Howard.  “We anticipate that those same characteristics will be invaluable in creating the resources needed to pave the way for the services of tomorrow.”“As cable continues to evolve, standards and professional development opportunities that align with new technologies are essential to the industry’s growth,” said Stoneback.  “I look forward to working with SCTE and its members to help the industry capitalize on technological advances and shape new service opportunities.”last_img read more

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Timothy Hoettges Deutsche Telekom wants to be a c

first_imgTimothy HoettgesDeutsche Telekom wants to be a “content aggregator” rather than an exclusive media rights-holder and will use its forthcoming launch of a new TV platform to support its aggregator strategy, according to CEO Timothy Hoettges, speaking to analysts after the company reported quarterly earnings at the end of last week.Hoettges said that Telekom’s main aim was to make life simpler for consumers by acting as an aggregator for the proliferating online video services and TV channels available, making as much as possible available via a single platform.He said that Telekom had a “partner strategy” for video, and that “our new TV platform, which is coming out soon, supports this idea”, without giving further details.Hoettges said that Deutsche Telekom would “have a look” at the forthcoming auction of Bundesliga rights and that the company had “not taken any final decision” on whether to bid. However, he said, a strategy of spending big on exclusive rights in a market with numerous free-to-air services, on the model of what BT has done in the UK, would “not be the appropriate answer” in Germany.Deutsche Telekom posted strong domestic TV numbers at the end of last week, growing its IPTV and satellite TV base in Germany by 2.5% quarter-on-quarter, taking its total to 3.768 million, an additional 27,000 over the three months since March. Year-on-year growth was 11.2%. Germany also saw strong retail broadband growth in the period.last_img read more

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Telekom Austria Group has struck a deal to acquire

first_imgTelekom Austria Group has struck a deal to acquire a controlling stake in Croatian fixed-line operator Metronet.The telco is acquiring the stake through its existing local operator Vipnet from a range of Croatian corporations, financial institutions and individuals, including Quaestus Private Equity Fund.Metronet primarily serves the business segment with data, voice, managed IT and cloud services and approximately 4,300 corporate customers, who generated approximately 90% of total revenues in 2015.The company is present in 66 cities, reaching approximately 85% of all corporate customers in Croatia via its fibre network. In 2015, the company generated revenues of approximately €28 million and EBITDA of approximately €12 million.Telekom Austria Group will finance the transaction via its existing cash flow. It did not disclose the price. Closing is expected for Q1 2017. The transaction is subject to merger control clearance.“The acquisition of Metronet strengthens the Group’s Croatian business, where it has been offering convergent services since 2011,” said Alejandro Plater, CEO and COO, Telekom Austria Group.last_img read more

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Todays article comes to us from world traveler a

first_img[Today’s article comes to us from world traveler and quintessential “international man” Dr. Jack Wheeler.] Jamestown, St. Helena, South Atlantic Ocean. If you have ever heard of this little 47 square mile island lost in a vast sea, 1,200 miles west of Africa and 1,800 miles east of Brazil, it’s because here is where the British exiled Napoleon after Waterloo, and here is where he died. The 5.5 years of Napoleon’s exile – October 15, 1815 to his death on May 5, 1821 – dominate the island’s 500-year history. For the last 354 years, since 1659, it has been a British possession. Yet such is the grip of Napoleon that the Brits ceded the home and property of where he lived in exile on St. Helena – called Longwood House – to the government of France. It is French territory, as is his original burial place nearby. Moreover, there is a Consul appointed by the French government, who lives in a diplomat’s mansion on the island. Personally, I have no regard for a megalomaniac responsible for the deaths of millions of people. The Brits should have treated him as a war criminal, executed him by firing squad aboard a ship far out to sea, and dumped his body in the ocean. But no. Instead the Brits treated this mass murderer, because he called himself “Emperor” and dressed himself in ermine robes, with the same honor and respect as if he were royalty. This has tainted St. Helena and its people ever since. You have to wonder though, after learning the island’s history, whether it has been tainted from the beginning. This place is a paradise – or rather, it’s a place that always could have been but never was. The people of St. Helena like to call themselves “Saints.” In a number of odd and interesting ways, they are the saints who lost paradise. And it turns out those ways are very relevant and instructive for us today. The folks who originally made it a paradise were the Portuguese. A captain named João da Nova returning from India was blown off course in 1502, and discovered an uninhabited island which he named St. Helena (the mother of Roman Emperor Constantine who converted him to Christianity) as it was her Saint’s Day (May 21). He had meant to keep a course up Africa’s west coast, but realized the prevailing winds (the southeast trades) made it quicker and easier to sail via this island that was lush and verdant, with a perfect climate for growing anything, and that no one knew about. The Portuguese converted it into a replenishment station to resupply ships on the way back home from India, planting fruit trees (fig, lemon, orange, pomegranate), plus vegetables and herbs, and left pigs and goats to breed – all for food for ships’ crews. They never colonized it nor built a settlement, and kept it a secret for 86 years. Then a British captain, Thomas Cavendish, found it in 1588, and soon British pirates used it to waylay Portuguese ships heavily laden with riches from the East. When the Dutch learned of St. Helena, they began fighting the Brits over it, and the Portuguese left in disgust that their peaceful paradise was spoiled. Even though the Brits and Dutch fought over it, strangely enough neither settled there, until 1659 when the British East India Company landed the first people to ever live on St. Helena. The fruit trees were flourishing, plenty of pigs and goats to eat (not to mention swarms of fish in the sea), plenty of water, forests, fertile land – and somehow these folks, even with African slaves, managed to go hungry. In 1672, the first of many mutinies and rebellions occurred, when the settlers seized the East India Company’s Governor of the island and shipped him back to England. Settlers and soldiers stationed by the Company mutinied and forcibly removed subsequent Governors in 1674, 1684, and 1693. The Company insisted a large contingent of soldiers was necessary to guard the island, among whom drunkenness was a constant problem. Whenever there wasn’t enough booze (rum shipped from the Caribbean or an island-made tequila distilled from fermented prickly pear juice), they would threaten to mutiny. The biggest was the Christmas Mutiny of 1783, after which ten soldiers were hung. All through this, the settlers and their slaves couldn’t manage to adequately feed and work for themselves. So in 1810, the Company imported hundreds of Chinese laborers. When Napoleon arrived in 1815, they built Longwood House and cultivated its gardens. The British spent a fortune guarding Napoleon to prevent his escaping as he had previously at Elba (an island just off the west coast of Italy, easy to escape from). 2,000 more soldiers were stationed on the island, and Royal Navy ships constantly patrolled the coastline. Napoleon and his entourage dined with fine cuisine and wines every night. He had his personal library of 1,847 books, he dictated his memoirs, his entourage doted on him, he had a life of peace and leisure. Yet he deteriorated rapidly. There are many contemporary drawings of him at Longwood, showing him getting fatter, older, and more depressed with each year. By 1820, he looked like an aged old man. When he died of stomach cancer the next year, he was 51 years old. The Brits withdrew their guarding soldiers and patrolling ships, and the islanders slid back into their usual poverty. In 1832, the East India Company turned control of the island to the Crown. St. Helena became a British Crown Colony and slavery was abolished, with 2,200 African slaves (one third of the population) liberated. The Colony was instructed to become self-sufficient – which, after an almost unbroken string of failed attempts, it has proved unable to do so to this day. From the 1840s through the 1870s, every attempt to establish the island as a whaling center failed. In 1869, the Suez Canal opened, so ships had no need to go around Africa (and stop at the island) to get to and from the Orient. More isolated than ever, the islanders turned to flax. Seedlings were imported from New Zealand, and grew like weeds. Flax mills were built to convert flax into fiber for rope and twine. Flax, however, is a plantation plant harvested with mechanization. On the mountainous slopes of the island, it could only be harvested by hand. Excepting a few rare interludes over the next 90 years, the flax industry could only be supported by government subsidy, and collapsed immediately after the subsidy was finally withdrawn in 1966. An attempt at establishing a lace-making industry failed in 1907, followed by the failure of a fish-canning factory in 1909. The islanders, it seems, just weren’t very good at catching fish. They never have been, accounting for the failure of another fish cannery in 1957. Another thing Saints have never been any good at is growing food. Valleys once full of groves of fruit trees left by the Portuguese became dead and stony due to neglect. Land cleared for pasture was allowed to erode away. The islanders were as bad at farming and husbandry as they were at fishing. They’ve been like that since the 1660s and are now. Most fruit, such as lemons and oranges, are imported today. It’s the same with most meat and vegetables, imported from South Africa. Tristan’s 262 people can feed themselves in a far harsher environment, but St. Helena, with some 3,000 people and thousands of acres of far more fertile land, cannot. What could account for centuries of incompetence and failure on this lush, beautiful island? What happened last week, before we got here, might help explain. A large cruise ship arrived, enroute to Cape Town, carrying 900 passengers. Not one of them was able to step ashore. Jamestown, the only place to make a landing, has no harbor – not even an itsy-bitsy one like Tristan with an itsy-bitsy breakwater. The Jamestown Wharf has no dock, no breakwater, nothing’s enclosed, the swell just slams into these concrete steps straight on. Last week, the swell was so large that it wasn’t safe for the ship’s tenders to offload passengers – so the ship finally sailed away, with 900 very angry and frustrated people aboard. Tristan can’t expand its micro-harbor as the water’s so deep. But Jamestown’s anchorage is shallow, making it far easier to construct a safe harbor – yet the Saints never bothered. Last week, they just shrugged their shoulders at the loss of business from 900 customers. I’m on a small expedition ship. There’s only 54 of us, and we use Zodiac inflatables to make landings. The swell is down a bit this week, so we all got ashore. We found most stores closed. It’s a Saint tradition that everything shuts down on Wednesday afternoons – and it just doesn’t matter if there are visitors in town willing to spend money. So I went off to climb Jacob’s Ladder. Jamestown is in a narrow valley open to the sea, two blocks wide and a mile long. In 1829, the Brits built what is still the world’s longest continuous stairway, 699 10-inch steps, at a gradient of 39° to 44°, to a fort at the top of the hill above the town. Going up Jacob’s Ladder wasn’t so bad – it was coming down fast that blew out my quadriceps. So I retired to the locals’ main watering hole, the bar at the Consulate Hotel, for a cold beer. There, old-timer Saints like Trevor and Geoff were happy to tell me how St. Helena was Paradise Lost. “I’d say the Saints’ problem has always been lack of enterprise,” Trevor let me know. “You say you’ve been to Tristan, right? They really know how to fish there, how to work hard, how to raise their sheep and grow potatoes. Here, folks don’t know and don’t want to know, they don’t care. They’d rather be poor and hungry than work hard. Been that way for centuries, why everything here always fails.” Geoff stepped in. “That may all be true – the government is always complaining about the Saints’ ‘lack of motivated labor,’ as they put it. But the government has always been the problem here, all the rules and very little private property, first of the Company and then the Crown ever since. All these ‘civil servants’ sent from London to run our lives – we call them ‘inky fingers.’ Their fingers used to be stained from handling the carbon copies of their forms in triplicate.” We all laughed hard and ordered another beer. I told them, “I have a news flash for you guys. In America, it’s just as bad now. Our lives are controlled by Obama’s inky-finger bureaucrats.” Geoff asked, “Are people in America leaving or staying? It won’t be as bad as here until lots of people leave and won’t stay. Then it keeps getting bad. For three centuries here, people with gumption left the island to work elsewheres like South Africa or England. Those with no gumption stayed. You say you’ve been to the Falklands – bet you met a lot of Saints working hard there, right?” I nodded. I thought of Carl, who managed the Malvina House Hotel in Stanley so well, and other smart, capable Saints I knew there. A fellow named Bob joined us. With a smile, he said, “Well, you might use these two as examples. Both are from old Saint families, born and raised on the island, then Geoff here joined the British Merchant Marine and sailed the world, while Trevor went to the UK and became a London cabbie. Do you know how smart you have to be with an encyclopedia in your head to be one of them?” I certainly did and said so. Trevor acknowledged the compliment. “Yes, for 37 years I was, and now we’re retired – Bob here was with the RAF (British Royal Air Force) – so we’ve come back home to live, where our pensions can easily carry us. Look around town, you’ll see many of us, and youngsters, but fewer of working age. They’ve left, and the remits (remittances) they send back to their families are what keep this economy afloat.” Bob added, “That and all the government paychecks everyone gets, for unemployment or a make-work government job.” I asked them, with almost no crime at all on the island, why did I see uniformed police walking in ones and twos all over town? “More make-work with government money,” came the answer. “Most of them are nice, but it’s still more government control, and more rules to enforce that are made up by the inky fingers.” Government control really is the universal social poison. Combine it with a flawed culture, and you get failure every time. The Saints were given a paradise, but they were never given freedom, not by the East India Company nor the British Crown. They never developed a work ethic, a determination to thrive, as did the people of Tristan. Those that did have it expressed it by leaving. The future of St. Helena may not be good, at least for the Saints. An international airport is being built on the island, by a South African company at British government expense. A “tourist boom” is expected, but just how and for whom is not clear. St. Helena is a beautiful place, but there are no beaches, there’s little wildlife, its history can be experienced in a morning’s tour of Longwood House and an afternoon walk in Jamestown. The airport should be completed by 2016 and the island is utterly unready. Not a single airline has committed to flying here. There’s no tourist infrastructure nor people trained in the tourist industry, and given the Saints’ work ethic, it’s unlikely there will be. Which means there’s going to be a huge influx of foreign labor to build the hotels and staff them and various tourist services. If the tourists come, on airlines willing to bring them. The whole thing may be the biggest St. Helena Failure of all. It may succeed, but those succeeding will be the foreign workers, managers, and business owners. Most Saints will remain on government paychecks, while Trevor, Geoff, and Bob will be at the Consulate Bar gently laughing about it all over a cold beer. The first Americans – settlers from England in the 1600s like the Saints – were given a paradise. And they were given their freedom. They put them together to develop a determination to thrive like no other people on earth. Yet freedom-destroying government control and subsidies can sap that determination out of any culture, and can cause the loss of any paradise. Ronald Reagan called America “the last, best hope of mankind.” The loss of a paradise on a volcanic speck in the South Atlantic Ocean means nothing, save to the tiny number of people who live there. The loss of the American Paradise of Freedom and Prosperity would be an incalculable loss for all of humanity. We haven’t lost it yet, but we’re losing more of it day by day, inch by inch. We’re losing what the Saints never had, a culture of freedom, self-sufficiency, personal responsibility, the determination to thrive, a culture not controlled by inky fingers. The Saints never had this, so it’s hard for them to acquire it. But we did have it, and we still have enough of a residue to get it back. We’re not Saints, we’re Americans. It’s time to shake off control of Zero’s inky fingers. [Editor’s Note: Once called “Indiana Jones of the Right” by The Washington Post, Dr. Jack Wheeler is the founder of To The Point, a website that serves as “The Oasis for Rational Conservatives”. Learn more at www.tothepointnews.com.]last_img read more

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Goldsmith Why I Work For Doug Casey Now—EyeOpeni

first_img Goldsmith: Why I Work For Doug Casey Now—Eye-Opening Report from Former Stansberry Director Sean Goldsmith recently left Stansberry to work alongside one of the most influential economists in the world today, Doug Casey. Goldsmith explains the full details here. Recommended Links The deals keep getting bigger…and one of the gravest financial warnings of 2015 keeps growing in relevance. Last month, legendary investor Carl Icahn publically warned that cheap money is fueling a bubble in dealmaking. Icahn said: …[W]hat [companies] do with the money is almost perverse. They just go in and buy another company to show analysts on Wall Street that earnings are going up, so their stock will go up and it’s financial engineering at its height. Icahn is known for buying huge stakes in “broken” companies…taking a seat on the board…and trying to turn the companies around. He knows more than almost anyone about buying companies. •  Last week, we were reminded of Icahn’s warning… On Thursday, pharmaceutical giant Pfizer (PFE) revealed plans to buy drugmaker Allergan PLC (AGN). Pfizer is the 12th-largest publicly-traded U.S. company. It’s worth $213 billion. Allergan is another huge drug company. It’s worth $123 billion. If the deal goes through, it would create the sixth-largest publicly-traded company in the U.S. The new company would dethrone Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) as the world’s largest healthcare company. Pfizer-Allergan would be biggest deal in a monster year for mergers and acquisitions. On Sunday, Financial Times said 2015 is shaping up to be the biggest year ever for global dealmaking: With close to $4tn worth of deals already announced this year, 2015 is on track to beat the all-time record of 2007, when the credit bubble helped generate $4.3tn worth of transactions. •  Pfizer has already made a big acquisition this year… In September, Pfizer completed its $15 billion purchase of pharmaceutical company Hospira. Pfizer’s management hopes these deals will help the company start growing again. Pfizer’s annual sales have declined, for the last four years, by an average of 6.5% per year. – The Fed’s Crazy Plan Zero percent interest rates have led to the largest amount of malinvestment in human history. How will the Fed’s historic monetary experiment end? And how will it affect you? To get Marc Faber’s insight into these questions and more, click here.center_img Regards, Justin Spittler Delray Beach, Florida November 2, 2015 We want to hear from you. If you have a question or comment, please send it to feedback@caseyresearch.com. We read every email that comes in, and we’ll publish comments, questions, and answers that we think other readers will find useful. If management’s track record is any indication, the acquisition of Allergan won’t create value for Pfizer’s shareholders. Since 2000, Pfizer has spent more than $235 billion buying other companies. However, Pfizer is only worth $213 billion today. Pfizer isn’t the only company in the healthcare sector making big deals. Last week, Financial Times reported global healthcare companies have announced $850 billion worth of deals this year. In July, health insurance company Anthem (ANTM) agreed to buy rival Cigna (CI) for $48.3 billion. The deal will create the nation’s largest health insurer. And last Tuesday, pharmacy chain Walgreens (WBA) bought rival Rite Aid (RAD) for $17 billion. It was a pricey acquisition…Walgreens paid more than a 50% premium to Rite Aid’s share price, and 21 times Rite Aid’s book value. •  Record low interest rates are driving the massive increase in dealmaking… During the 2008 financial crisis, the Federal Reserve dropped its key interest rate to effectively zero. The Fed has held rates near zero ever since. Seven years of zero percent rates have made it ridiculously cheap to borrow money. Many companies have used this as an opportunity to buy out competitors with borrowed money. According to the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, U.S. corporations borrowed a record of $1.2 trillion in the bond market through the first nine months of 2015. •  Buying a competitor can boost sales and profits… But Carl Icahn notes the “high” usually wears off quick. Last month, Icahn said buying a company with borrowed money was like “taking a drug.” It can cause sales and profits to jump, but the benefit usually only lasts a year or two. Icahn says U.S. companies are buying up rivals to goose their earnings numbers. He says this is masking major problems in corporate America. And the facts back up his claim… Last week, The Wall Street Journal explained how U.S. business investment has stalled since the financial crisis: Business investment in the real economy is weak. While U.S. gross domestic product rose 8.7% from late 2007 through 2014, gross private investment was a mere 4.3% higher. Growth in nonresidential fixed investment remains substantially lower than the last six post-recession expansions. Instead of investing to build their businesses, companies are taking a shortcut to growth by buying other companies. In July, Forbes reported that 54% of CEOs in the U.S. plan to complete an acquisition by the end of the year. •  Earnings growth has been sluggish… Earnings for companies in the S&P 500 have only grown 6.9% annually since 2011. That’s far less than during past economic expansions, according to The Wall Street Journal. Earnings grew 12.9% per year between 2003 and 2007. They grew at 11% per year between 1995 and 1999… As of Friday, 340 companies in the S&P 500 reported third-quarter results. So far, earnings have declined 2.2% from last year. We can’t know for sure until all the results are in, but it appears that earnings will decline overall this quarter. If that happens, research firm FactSet says it will be the first time since 2009 that earnings have declined two quarters in a row. If you’ve been listening to Icahn’s warnings, this bad earnings news shouldn’t be a surprise. Instead of investing in their businesses, companies are using cheap money and financial engineering to boost profits. That can work for a while. But once the “high” wears off, you’re left within shrinking profits and no growth. Chart of the Day Don’t buy into the “recovery” hype… Today’s chart shows the number of people enrolled in the U.S. federal food stamp program. As you might expect, the number of people on food stamps surged during the financial crisis. However, food stamp usage kept rising through 2013. More than forty million Americans are still on food stamps today, nearly double the pre-crisis number. This isn’t what a healthy, growing economy looks like. —last_img read more

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What are the rules of warIts a timely question i

first_imgWhat are the rules of war?It’s a timely question in the wake of attacks on civilians, aid workers and hospitals in conflict zones around the world. Just this week, three hospitals in southern Syria were bombed by pro-government forces, according to The Washington Post.After such incidents, there are many references to the “rules of war.”In January, a British MP wrote an op-ed in The Guardian calling for the prosecution of the forces in Yemen led by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates “for any violations against civilians and breaches of the rules of war.” This month the coalition’s forces have been attacking the port city of Hodeida, Yemen’s lifeline to critical aid, food and fuel.Doctors Without Borders has this month declared “that the conduct of hostilities in Syria may violate the basic rules of war.”The president of UNICEF in Canada has declared, “Around the world, the rules of war are under attack — and so are millions of children.”The rules of war are part of the Geneva Convention and they first were established in the 19th century.They dictate what can and cannot be done during armed conflict. They aim to protect people who are not fighting in the conflict and curb the brutality of war by setting limits on the weapons and tactics that can be employed.Representatives of aid groups say there is a growing disregard for these rules in conflict zones around the world. “It has become glaringly obvious that respect for international humanitarian law is in decline,” says Scott Paul, the humanitarian policy lead of Oxfam America, a global aid agency.History of the rules of warAlthough our modern rules of war can be traced back to ancient civilizations and religions, it was Henri Dunant, the founder of the Red Cross, who began the process of codifying these customs into international humanitarian law. In 1864, he helped establish the first Geneva Convention, an international treaty that required armies to care for the sick and wounded on the battlefield. It was adopted by 12 European countries.Over the next 85 years, diplomats debated and adopted additional amendments and treaties to address the treatment of combatants at sea and prisoners of war — not just combatants on battlefields. In 1949, after the horrors of World War II, diplomats gathered again in Geneva to adopt four treaties that reaffirmed and updated the previous treaties and expanded the rules to protect civilians. They’re now collectively known as the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and contain the most important rules of war.Upholding the rulesSince then, the rules of war have been ratified by 196 states. They protect people who are not fighting in the conflict and curb the brutality of war by setting limits on the weapons and tactics that can be employed. In 2014, for example, the rules helped guarantee safe passage for civilians in South Sudan to flee violence.They’re also used in domestic and international courts to determine if a government or non-governmental militant group is guilty of a war crime. If a warring party is accused of violating international humanitarian law — whether by an individual, group, country or observer — countries are obligated to investigate. The U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, for example, helped punish war criminals who committed mass atrocities during the Bosnian war in the 1990s.The U.N. Security Council, a group of 15 countries at the U.N. charged to maintain international peace and security, may also impose sanctions — like a travel ban or an arms embargo — as an incentive for warring parties to comply with the rules of war.Enforcing the rules can be difficult. For example, the five veto-holding permanent members of the Security Council — the U.S., China, Russia, the U.K. and France — must vote unanimously to pursue a resolution that might call for an investigation, refer a case to a court for trial, threaten sanctions or propose another motion. But often one or several of these countries has a vested interest in the conflict in question.As mandated by the Conventions, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has a special role to play as a guardian of these laws. The ICRC tracks the evolution of warfare and makes recommendations for updates to the rules accordingly. It also participates in U.N. discussions on crises and potential violations to ensure the rules are being upheld.In addition, the ICRC helps inform the public of the rules of war through videos and social media messaging. This 2-minute film, titled “Why we can’t save her life,” won a Grand Prix award at the Cannes Lions festival in France this month. The film reminds people that hospitals are not a target.The rules of warAlthough there are many rules contained in the Conventions, here are six crucial principles that are relevant to ongoing conflicts. Because the rules themselves often use legal terms, we have paraphrased the language. To read the original language, click here:1. No targeting civiliansIntentionally targeting civilians, buildings such as schools or houses and infrastructure like water sources or sanitation facilities is a war crime. Killing or injuring a person who has surrendered or is no longer able to fight is also prohibited, as is punishing someone for an act that another person, even a family member, has committed.Attacks should only be directed at military objectives, and military targets such as bases and stockpiles should not be placed in or near populated areas.If the expected “incidental civilian damage” of an attack is “excessive and disproportionate” to the anticipated military gain, then the attack legally cannot be carried out.There is one caveat: a civilian structures, for example a school, may become a legitimate target if it is being used for specific military operations — as a base to launch attacks, for example, or a weapons storehouse.2. No torture or inhumane treatment of detaineesTorture and other forms of cruel, degrading or ill treatment are expressly prohibited. The lives, rights and dignity of detainees should be preserved. They must be given food and water, protected from violence and allowed to communicate with their families.There are no exceptions to this rule, even when torture might elicit lifesaving information.3. No attacking hospitals and aid workersThe wounded and sick always have a right to be cared for, regardless of which side of the conflict they’re on. Medical and aid workers who are on duty in these areas make an effort to be neutral and serve both sides of the conflict. They must, therefore, be protected by all warring parties and allowed access to collect and care for the wounded and sick.If combatants see a red cross or red crescent, symbols of the national Red Cross and Red Crescent societies, they should know that person or place should not be attackedBut the rules of law do grant an exception for hospitals as well as other civilian structures. If a hospital is being used for specific military operations, it may become a legitimate target.4. Provide safe passage for civilians to fleeParties to a conflict must take all reasonable steps to evacuate civilians from areas where there is fighting. In the heat of conflict, such steps can take the form of advanced warnings or the creation of “safe corridors” for civilians to leave a besieged city and for humanitarian workers to deliver aid and services. Civilians must never be blocked from fleeing.5. Provide access to humanitarian organizationsCivilians and militants who are no longer fighting in the conflict have a right to receive the help they need, whether it’s medical care, food, water or shelter. This means that restricting the delivery of humanitarian aid — through naval and air blockades, closing ports or confiscating supplies — is prohibited. In fact, deliberately causing starvation and hunger is a war crime.6. No unnecessary or excessive loss and sufferingThe tactics and weapons used in war must be proportionate and necessary to achieve a definitive military objective. The use of weapons that are “by nature indiscriminate,” according to the Geneva Conventions, is prohibited. For example, the use of land mines, while not banned, is limited because they can indiscriminately kill and maim both combatants and civilians.Joanne Lu is a freelance journalist who covers global poverty and inequity. Her work has appeared in Humanosphere, The Guardian, Global Washington and War is Boring. Follow her on Twitter @joannelu. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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US Supreme Court Allows Part of Trumps Travel Ban to Take Effect

first_img Enroll Now for $5 Trump & Business Lydia Belanger The ban ‘may not be enforced against foreign nationals who have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.’ Image credit: Eric Thayer / Stringer | Getty Images U.S. Supreme Court Allows Part of Trump’s Travel Ban to Take Effect Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful.center_img Add to Queue Next Article 4 min read –shares The Supreme Court ruled Monday to reinstate a limited version of President Donald Trump’s executive order, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States,” better known as the travel ban.It will go into effect on June 29 (72 hours after the Supreme Court’s ruling was issued), with the following exception: The ban “may not be enforced against foreign nationals who have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States,” according to the Supreme Court ruling. This ruling applies to tourists as well as students accepted into U.S. higher education institutions or employees of companies in the U.S. seeking new visas.The ban, which restricts foreign nationals from six Muslim-majority countries — Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — from entering the United States for a period of 90 days, as well as refugees from any country from entering the U.S. for 120 days, was blocked by federal circuit courts earlier this year prior to being implemented, on March 15. The block has been upheld by appeals courts. Judges in these courts cited insufficient evidence of national security risk, as well as discrimination against Muslims, in their rulings of the travel ban’s unconstitutionality.Today is the last day before the Supreme Court goes on summer break; the justices will reconvene on Oct. 2 and will hear full oral arguments for the case sometime after that. The Trump administration originally issued the 90-day ban on national security grounds and has stated it will perform an internal review of vetting procedures for visa applicants from the six countries specified during the 90-day period. The justices said they “fully expect” this review should be complete prior to Oct. 2, so the case may no longer be relevant by then.Some have expressed concern that the “credible claim of a bona fide relationship” language in the Supreme Court’s June 26 ruling leaves too much room for individual interpretation and discretion — including Justice Clarence Thomas. He wrote in his opinion that it will “burden executive officials with the task of deciding — on peril of contempt — whether individuals from the six affected nations who wish to enter the United States have a sufficient connection to a person or entity in this country.” He wrote that this will “invite a flood of litigation until this case is finally resolved.”It is yet to be seen how this will be uniformly enforced. The ruling states that, “as for entities, the relationship must be formal, documented, and formed in the ordinary course, rather than for the purpose of evading EO–2. … A worker who accepted an offer of employment from an American company or a lecturer invited to address an American audience [would have such a relationship with an American entity]. … A nonprofit group devoted to immigration issues may not contact foreign nationals from the designated countries, add them to client lists, and then secure their entry by claiming injury from their exclusion.”The executive order in question is the second of two executive order travel bans. The first, signed by President Trump on Jan. 27, included Iraq, specified preferential treatment for Christians and banned Syrian refugees indefinitely. It was stopped by a federal court on Feb. 3.Related: Trump’s Travel Ban: What Has Happened So FarIn March, Entrepreneur explored implications of the travel ban for business travelers and entrepreneurs. It caused uncertainty and inconvenience for individuals — even those who were permanent U.S. residents — during the period in which it was blocked by lower courts, as individuals and organizations were aware that the ban or another iteration of it might be instated at any time.Read: Trump Travel Ban, Even While Blocked, Casts Long Shadow Over Immigrant EntrepreneursRead: What Business Travelers Need to Know About Trump’s Travel Ba June 26, 2017last_img read more

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Yahoo Expected to Outline CostCutting Efforts

first_img Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business 2 min read Reuters Next Article October 20, 2014 Yahoo Inc is expected on Tuesday to outline cost-cutting efforts and give details of how it is evaluating possible acquisitions as it faces pressure from an activist investor, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing a person who was briefed on the plan.Yahoo is considering acquiring one or more large technology startups with some of the $5.8 billion it made from the initial public offering of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd, the newspaper said.Representatives at Yahoo did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment outside regular U.S. business hours.Last month, activist investor Starboard Value LP publicly pressured Yahoo to cut what it referred to as a “bloated” cost structure.Starboard, the second activist investor to target Yahoo in the last three years, also said the company should quickly “monetize” its Asian assets, which exceed the enterprise value of its actual business.Earlier this month, Yahoo said it is reducing the size of its operations in Bangalore, India, the Internet company’s largest engineering facility outside its California headquarters. It is also closing its office in Jordan.Yahoo is “streamlining” its operations in foreign offices, which might involve a combination of closing offices, cutting jobs and moving workers to its Sunnyvale, California, headquarters, the Journal said.(Reporting by Supriya Kurane in Bangalore; Editing by Gopakumar Warrier) Register Now » Add to Queue This story originally appeared on Reuters –shares Cost Cutting Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Yahoo Expected to Outline Cost-Cutting Effortslast_img read more

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Cloudinary Brings Adobe Creative Cloud Connector for Dynamic Digital Experiences

first_img Adobe Creative CloudCLoudinarydigital asset managementDynamic Digital ExperiencesMarketing TechnologyNews Previous ArticleOracle Ushers in New Era of AnalyticsNext ArticleNeongecko Inc. Launches “Neon AI Nano HTML” to Add Conversational AI to Websites Integration Enables Cloudinary DAM and Adobe Creative Cloud Users to More Easily Deliver Engaging Campaigns and Dynamic Digital ExperiencesCloudinary announced that it is adding the Adobe Creative Cloud Connector to its suite of end-to-end media management integrations. The new connector enables Cloudinary Digital Asset Management (DAM) and Creative Cloud customers to streamline media workflows, allowing creative, marketing and development stakeholders to work seamlessly and more effectively across solutions, and more easily create and deliver dynamic media experiences. The Connector is currently in beta with customers and will be generally available this summer.“Our integration with Creative Cloud makes the entire media management process even more seamless, facilitating deep productivity improvements and improved workflows across teams.”Adobe Creative Cloud compromises Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and more, enabling users to manage everything from image compositing and photo editing to website design. The Cloudinary Creative Cloud Connector enables users to move media assets freely between both Cloudinary and Adobe platforms, and quickly and easily manipulate and transform those assets within a single source of truth for optimal delivery across browsers and mobile devices, no matter where customers are engaging.Marketing Technology News: Leading Associations Turn to ON24 for Member Engagement and Revenue Growth“The Cloudinary DAM solution enables brands to craft dynamic media experiences that support greater user engagement and improved bottom-line impact,” said Ariel Shiran, Senior Director of Product, Cloudinary. “Our integration with Creative Cloud makes the entire media management process even more seamless, facilitating deep productivity improvements and improved workflows across teams.”Marketing Technology News: Zeno Media and ADORA Cooperate on Strategic Marketing and Mobile App Content for Diaspora ListenersLater this week, Cloudinary will be at the Henry Stewart DAM Europe 2019 conference in London, June 27-28, demoing its recently enhanced DAM, which helps dozens of leading brands manage their media assets and workflows, including Apartment Therapy, Gymshark, Nintendo of Europe, StubHub and trivago.Marketing Technology News: Insite Software Announces Major New Enhancements for InsiteCommerce Cloudinary Brings Adobe Creative Cloud Connector for Dynamic Digital Experiences Business WireJune 26, 2019, 2:48 pmJune 26, 2019 last_img read more

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Air pollution on the rise outside GP offices and hospitals finds study

first_img Source:https://www.blf.org.uk/take-action/campaign/nhs-toxic-air-report By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDOct 26 2018A new report has shown that the air outside the offices of General Practitioners and outside hospitals are high in pollutants. This can aggravate the lung problems in patients of asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) says the report.The report looks at the air quality of 2,200 GP surgeries and 248 hospitals and has shown that the air particles called particulate matter or PM2.5, around them exceed the recommended levels from the World Health Organisation (WHO). When patients with pre-existing lung conditions visit these places, they are put at a great risk the report states.The tiny particles of air pollutants are capable of passing via nose into the lungs and blood stream of the patients visiting these offices and hospitals. These can lead to asthma exacerbations as well says the report. The study was backed by the British Lung Foundation and was conducted by the Cambridge Environmental Research Consultants.The researchers have said that this level of air pollution is “unacceptable”. Alison Cook, director of policy at Cambridge Environmental Research Consultants in a statement said, “It can’t be right that hospital staff and GPs must care for people in environments that could worsen their symptoms and could be putting them at risk of a whole range of health problems.”A total of around 10,000 NHS health centres and areas around them were looked at in this study. It was noted that one third of GP practices and one fourth of hospitals are located in regions where air pollution is beyond recommended safe levels. Not surprisingly, the levels of pollution are greatest in major and moderately large cities such as London and Birmingham as well as Cardiff, Leeds, Leicester, Nottingham and Southampton. Great Ormond Street Hospital in London and Birmingham’s ChildrenRelated StoriesResearch opens possibility of developing single-dose gene therapy for inherited arrhythmiasImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesHospital were particularly vulnerable to pollution, the report said. Smaller towns too were not free from pollution says the report and cites examples of Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, Cornwall, Ipswich, Westcliff-on-Sea, Gillingham, Worthing, Kettering, Basingstoke, Colchester, Hull and Chelmsford. Wales came up with 54 GP surgeries that were located in air polluted areas while Scotland had three in Aberdeen, Falkirk and Berwickshire which were in polluted regions.Dr Maria Neira, from the WHO said that these hospitals and the GP surgeries were the “heart and lungs” of the healthcare system and no one who was visiting these places should be at risk of being exposed to air pollution. The British Lung Foundation also added that at least 12 million people are at risk of air pollution and its harmful effects. Improving the air quality can reduce the exacerbation and aggravation of thousands of cases of asthma, COPD, heart disease, stroke and lung cancers, the BLF says.Air pollution is responsible for around 40,000 prematrue deaths in the UK annually say the statistics. According to a statement from a Defra spokesman, the Government would adhere to its Clean Air Strategy and said, “The forthcoming Environment Bill will include provisions to improve air quality.”UK currently meets its own maximum legally recommended pollutant PM2.5 levels but this is twice as high as the WHO recommendation. This report comes right before the next week’s WHO global pollution conference.last_img read more

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Antirejection medications for kidney transplants linked to increased skin cancer risk

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 27 2019A study led by researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) has analyzed the pattern of skin cancer rates in kidney transplant patients, which suggests the increased risk is related to the anti-rejection medications.The research is published in JAMA Dermatology and was a collaboration between the National Cancer Registry Ireland and the National Kidney Transplant Service in Beaumont Hospital.Patients who receive a kidney transplant are at increased risk of cancer, in particular skin cancer. The study found that this skin cancer risk falls when the transplant fails and the patients return to dialysis but rises again when they receive another transplant. However, the rate of skin cancer is still higher in patients with failed transplants than pre-transplant patients on dialysis.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryDue to this pattern of skin cancer rates, the data suggests that the cancer risk is related to the stopping and starting of anti-rejection medications.”In recipients of multiple kidney transplants, the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer fell during periods defined by transplant failure, but there was still an elevated risk. The incidence of cancer overall highlights the need for continued cancer surveillance during graft failure,” said the study’s lead author Dr Donal Sexton, Department of Nephrology and Kidney Transplantation, Beaumont Hospital, RCSI.The study analyzed the rates of cancer in 3,821 individual deceased and living kidney transplant recipients. Of the patients analyzed, 3,215 recipients had one transplant, 522 recipients a second; and 84 recipients had three kidney transplants.During the patient’s first kidney transplant, the rate of skin cancer rose 15 times higher than before the procedure. That skin cancer rate fell by half when the transplant failed and the patient returned to dialysis; however, the rate was still seven times higher than the pre-transplant patient’s rate. When they received a second transplant, the rate of skin cancer rose again to 12.8 times more than pre-transplant rate.”Our study has provided a comprehensive analysis of cancer risk over multiple kidney transplants in the same individuals. However, the retrospective nature of the analysis makes it difficult to capture the effect of the lag between exposure, cancer development, presentation, and diagnosis, and which may vary by treatment period,” said Professor Peter Conlon, Associate Professor of Medicine at RCSI.RCSI is ranked among the top 250 (top 2%) of universities worldwide in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings (2019) and its research is ranked first in Ireland for citations. It is an international not-for-profit health sciences institution, with its headquarters in Dublin, focused on education and research to drive improvements in human health worldwide. RCSI has been awarded Athena Swan Bronze accreditation for positive gender practice in higher education. Source:https://www.rcsi.com/dublin/news-and-events/news/news-article/2019/02/rcsi-research-suggests-that-anti-rejection-medications-for-multiple-kidney-transplantslast_img read more

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Study Early screening of autism may not be as beneficial as previously

first_imgPål Suren explains: “We generally want both sensitivity and specificity to be as high as possible. There isa trade-off between the two. If the threshold for testing positive is lowered, sensitivity increases but usually at the price of decreasing specificity – and vice versa”.Related StoriesTransgenerational BPA exposure may contribute to autism, study findsBullying in children with ASD gets worse with ageHigh levels of acid in processed foods could affect fetus’ developing brainLanguage delay is a common symptom of autism. However, most of the children (76 per cent) with autism had developed phrase speech at 36 months and did not have significant cognitive delays. For these children, screening scores largely overlap scores in those without autism, meaning it is hard to distinguish these children from children with normal development.The results and methods are presented in more detail in BJPsych Open.BackgroundAutism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterised by persistent impairment in reciprocal social communication and interaction, and restricted, repetitive behavioural patterns. Symptoms usually appear by the second year of life. ASD is often referred to as just “autism”.Current guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics state that ASD screening should be included in general developmental check-ups at ages 18 and 24 months. British guidelines, however, do not recommend universal autism screening. The benefits and disadvantages of such screening have never been assessed in population-based studies.Sensitivity and specificitySensitivity is the proportion of individuals with a condition who test positive. This is a measure of the test’s ability to detect those who have the condition.Specificity is the proportion of individuals without a condition who test negative. This is a measure of the precision of the test, i.e. the test’s ability to distinguish between those with and without the condition.Source:Norwegian Institute of Public HealthJournal reference:Surén, P. et al. (2019) Sensitivity and specificity of early screening for autism. BJPsych Open. doi.org/10.1192/bjo.2019.34 Current available evidence does not support universal early screening for autism.”Dr Pål Surén, lead author of the study Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 17 2019Screening for autism at three years of age only identifies those with significant developmental delay, and not those with less severe autism. Early screening may therefore not be as beneficial as previously thought, according to data from the Norwegian Mother, Father and Child Cohort Study.This study measured the extent with which a commonly used screening tool could identify children with autism at 36 months. It found that the tool identified only one in five children who had autism.The screening identified individuals with autism spectrum disorders with significant development delay well but captured very few children with autism who have cognitive skills in the normal range.The authors of this study therefore question whether the benefits of nationwide screening outweigh the costs. Of the 385 children with autism, only one out of five children with autism tested positive at age three. In other words, screening sensitivity was 20 per cent. Screening captured only a minority of the children with autism and mainly those with significant developmental delay. Overall, screening specificity was 99 per cent. This means that the instrument has high precision because there were relatively few “false positives” (only 1 % children without autism tested positive). By lowering the cut-off score in the screening tool, sensitivity improved but led to a considerable increase in the number of false positives. About this studyThis study investigated the “sensitivity” and “specificity” of population-based autism screening at three years of age (see background). A total of 58 520 mothers from the Norwegian Mother, Father and Child Cohort Study participated. They answered the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ), a 40-item screening instrument for autism spectrum disorders. The children were followed up until the end of 2015, when they were aged from six to 14-years-old. By the end of the follow-up, 385 children (0.7 per cent) were identified as autistic.Findingslast_img read more

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