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Kansas State University will save $200,000 annually with new wind power deal

first_imgKansas State University will save $200,000 annually with new wind power deal FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享KSAL.com:Kansas State University is saving energy costs and becoming greener by using one of Kansas’ most abundant resources: wind. A new university agreement with Westar Energy will provide approximately 50 percent of the energy needs for the university’s main Manhattan campus from a wind farm in Nemaha County and save the university nearly $200,000 annually.The agreement is part of Westar Energy’s new Renewables Direct program, which provides large customers access to renewable energy at set long-term prices. The program involves the 300-megawatt Soldier Creek Wind Energy Center, which is a wind farm that will be built in Nemaha County and is estimated to be on line in 2020. Kansas State University is one of 14 Kansas organizations that will receive electricity from the wind farm.As part of a 20-year agreement, the wind farm will provide Kansas State University with 14 megawatts of power, which is approximately 50 percent of the current load of the university’s Manhattan campus, said Gary Weishaar, university manager of energy and controls. The anticipated savings for the university will be approximately $180,000 to $200,000 annually.The savings will come from a reduction in the retail energy cost adjustment, also known as fuel factor costs, Weishaar said. Under the Renewables Direct program, the price of electricity provided from Soldier Creek Wind Energy Center will be fixed for 20 years at 1.8 cents per kilowatt-hour and replaces the fuel factor cost, which is currently 2.3 cents per kilowatt-hour. The university’s average annual consumption for the Manhattan campus for the last five years has been 113 million kilowatt-hours per year. The university also will receive renewable energy credits associated with the agreement.Westar Energy’s Renewables Direct program is designed to provide large customers a path toward their sustainability goals with Kansas’ abundant, affordable renewable energy. Participating customers are able to claim a portion of the energy generated by the wind farm as their own, retain all of the renewable attributes and lock in a portion of their electricity prices for 20 years. The program is structured to add projects in the future to keep up with the demand for renewable sources.More: Green energy: Wind will generate big savings at KSUlast_img read more

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Where Do We Go from Here?

first_imgGerry Seavo James, founder of The Waterman Series and Explore Kentucky, puts on events throughout Kentucky, including paddling races, festivals and a triathlon, that draw thousands of people from across the country. And all of it—the funding, the participation, the permits—is up in the air. “For me it’s a big hit, but also for the local community it’s a hit because we come and camp and buy food and gasoline,” James said. “They stay at the campground or a hotel, we buy shirts, there’s snacks, we eat at the barbecue restaurant where it ends. It’s part of this ecosystem of events around the state.”  At Phidippides, a running store in Georgia, the staff tried to figure out how to keep the shop open when so much of their business is done face to face. When relying on online sales wasn’t working, they started offering virtual fittings through Zoom. Store employees walked customers through the normal process, asking about their running habits and watching them run around. The customer could then get the shoe shipped to them or pick it up curbside to see if it fit. “A big concern when we rolled this out was the feel of a shoe is so important and we were afraid we were going to be taking a lot of returns through this process,” said General Manager Sloan Ware. “But it actually hasn’t been the case. Most of the time, we’re able to get down to a shoe that is going to work really well for that person. It hasn’t been as difficult with returns as we initially expected.” “It all came crashing to a halt,” James said. “For this African American-oriented project that already has less attention than legacy organizations, can we bounce back after COVID? The economy’s going to be down. Can we get the donations we need?”   When funding increases, Leavitt said brands need to take a look at how they are sponsoring athletes and influencers in the industry and with what resources. “Recognizing that being paid in income is important,” she said. “Likes aren’t going to pay the rent. There’s multiple levels of who has rank in the industry, whether it’s in the nonprofit or for-profit world, and who comes out of this situation okay. If brands want to come out of this in a better light, they have to start thinking about the bigger picture. How are they actually creating space for BlPOC people in their business in higher-level positions? How are they going to look at their ambassador and athlete team? How are they actually taking the time to listen and wanting to fix the problems versus just throwing money to try and do a quick fix.”  “Developing our recreation infrastructure is an opportunity to invest in resources like trails and river access points that will benefit the quality of life and economy of the community down the road,” he said. “We’re anticipating seeing people leaving densely populated areas and moving to less densely populated areas. So, I think those communities that get out in front of this trend, make some serious investment, and build their outdoor brand are going to win.”  For seasonal businesses like River & Trail Outfitters, the pandemic hit at a particularly difficult time—the lowest cash point of the year coming into their main season. “For a seasonal business, you really have to think about the three or four months to make hay while the sun shines,” said owner Natasha Baihly. “You just really hope you’re going to get those couple of months in order to make your business go. You don’t get the opportunity to slide it into the winter or have things pick up in the middle of the fall.”  From online sales and curbside pickups to virtual events, retailers are reimagining the way they interact with customers. For Joey Riddle, owner of Joey’s Bike Shop in West Virginia, bike sales and bike repairs are through the roof. “We have no bikes on our floor and we can’t get any,” he said. “That’s the biggest problem right now. Bike companies are sold out of bikes. Typically, this time of year, we have over 100 bikes in stock. We have 15 with nothing on the horizon probably until July.” The Road to Recovery So how can the outdoor industry be a part of our economic recovery? The Outdoor Alliance, a national coalition of 10 outdoor recreation groups, including IMBA, Access Fund, and American Whitewater, is advocating for recreation infrastructure projects at the Congressional level. Communications Director Tania Lown-Hecht said the pandemic amplified inequalities that have existed in communities for a long time. “Where are the green spaces, parks, and forests and who can get there?” she said. “Our hope is that decision makers, especially members of Congress, see how important that kind of recreation and green infrastructure is for the country and see that as a priority investment.” Jenn Chew, director of The Assaults, on supporting events in the future: “The uncertainty of when it can open back up has affected not only the people who work in the industry, whether it be event directors or producers, but even people that are stagehands, AV companies, and anything that has to do with putting on events. Without participation, they’re going to die off, just as they are right now with not being able to have them. I think it’s really important for people to participate, support, and attend events, festivals, rides, races, and concerts.” River & Trail was also in the middle of an expansion when the pandemic hit, preparing to open another location for their whitewater rafting trips. The Baihly’s decided to take a leap of faith and go ahead with the new location in hopes that families would be looking for ways to get outside together this summer. “My dad always said that boats and beer were the things that would withstand anything,” Baihly said. “And I think he might be right. We have 48 years behind us, so that’s a wonderful thing.”  An event, whether it’s a race, festival, or fundraiser, is centered around the idea of community and bringing people together. Racers huddled at the start line, volunteers working aid stations, and crowds surging towards the stage—it’s difficult to imagine what these events will look like with social distancing measures put in place.  To address these inequalities and contribute to economic recovery, organizations including Outdoor Alliance are pushing for national solutions like a conservation corps dedicated to rebuilding outdoor infrastructure and providing jobs. Legislation like the Great American Outdoors Act would provide permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund and money for backlogged park maintenance projects. “That would provide crucial funding that will help put people back to work, address urgent maintenance needs, and have more close to home recreation opportunities,” Lown-Hecht said.  Moving Forward — More Voices from the Outdoors Predict the Path Ahead Roan Mountain, Tenn., is one of those places that relies on outdoor recreation to bring in tourism dollars as an official Appalachian Trail Community. Mike Hill, a Carter County commissioner representing Roan Mountain, said businesses in town rely on the thru-hiker bubble that comes through each year. “When they come off trail in Roan Mountain, they’ve been in the woods since Erwin, Tenn.,” he said. “They’re hungry. They’d love to do some laundry. They need resupply items. A shower with hot water and a washcloth is a huge deal. They come off the trail with discretionary income and specific needs.” These events, no matter their size, take time and funding to succeed. Planning for Color the Crag, a climbing festival held at Horse Pens 40 to promote black, indigenous, and people of color climbers, takes organizers a full year to prepare for four days of climbing, clinics, and demos. Leaders from Brown Girls Climb and Brothers of Climbing, the partnership behind the festival, decided to cancel the festival in October to take care of themselves, their families, and their community during these difficult times. Brittany Leavitt, the festival’s director of operations, said even if the pandemic were over by the end of the summer, it wouldn’t be enough time to get everything together. “We’ve all seen the documentary of Fyre Fest,” she said. “That’s pretty much what they did. They did it in a few weeks to try and figure things out. That’s just impossible.”  With the Summer Outdoor Retailer show cancelled, opportunities to network with brands for sponsorships were cut short. “There’s been furloughs and layoffs,” Leavitt said. “A lot of brands have downsized their employees. Therefore, most of that money isn’t going to go towards events. It’s going to go towards supporting their employees. That takes a big toll on us because we aren’t able to redesign or reconfigure that support system for this event.”  James started canceling events scheduled in March, April, and May before Kentucky got its first confirmed case to keep people safe. But the uncertainty of how long the pandemic would last, and how widespread the effects would be, made it difficult when thinking about events farther down the line. For two years, James has been helping plan the Outdoor Adventure Weekend with the Friends of Cherokee State Historic Park for June 2020. The park was originally built during a time of segregation as one of the few parks in the South open to the Black community. Funds raised from a weekend of art, music, and cultural activities would go towards revitalization of the park, including new signage, a pollinator habitat, and programming. The three-day event has now been rescheduled for Summer 2021. A New Way of Doing Business While the virtual fittings have helped Phidippides stay open during this time, it hasn’t made up for people coming into the store and looking around. “Across the board, people are very concerned about where their money is going,” Ware said. “Right now, buying a $130 pair of shoes is a luxury good. With so much uncertainty in the world for people’s incomes, it’s a big ask for people to be spending a lot of their money on something outdoorsy.”  Where do we go from here? That’s the question on everyone’s mind. In a time when COVID-19 continues to affect day-to-day life and the future is filled with uncertainty, what will outdoor recreation look like when we are able to start gathering again?center_img Most bikes and bike parts are made overseas. Between factory closures, shipping delays, and restrictions, companies are struggling to keep up with high demand. Riddle is actually turning away customers, telling them he’ll call if he finds any bikes. “This is like the perfect storm,” he said. “We’re getting in whatever we can. It doesn’t seem to matter what it is. We’re selling it.”  At the same time, more bike manufacturers are shipping directly to customers—a growing trend in the last five years, with the pandemic fast tracking the way bike companies do things. But customers are still coming into the shop when something isn’t shipped right, or they can’t put something together. “The internet cannot fix your bike,” Riddle said.  Dr. Kim Walker, co-founder of Abundant Life Adventure Club, on taking a simpler approach to getting outside: “It doesn’t have to be very complicated, you don’t have to go very far, and you don’t have to spend a lot of money. I feel like a lot more people are realizing or revisiting their appreciation for the health benefits of spending time outdoors.” When the Appalachian Trail Conservancy asked thru-hikers to step off the trail in March, Roan Mountain lost out on some of that revenue generated by hikers stopping in town. The town also canceled their annual trail festival, Hikerpalooza, originally scheduled for May. Although the class of 2020 thru-hikers will have to reschedule their thru-hikes, Hill and others in the community are pushing the message that Roan Mountain is the perfect place to get outside away from other people. “We are Roan Mountain and we are the Appalachian Trail,” Hill said. “Social distancing wise, it’s a really awesome opportunity to get out away from it all. I really think that message is going to resonate more and mean more to people now than it would have six months ago. The trail is still here, our characters are still here. There’s plenty of room, and we’ll see you when you get here.”  Altogether, Riddle sees the increased interest as a good thing for the bike industry. “Hopefully we can retain 10 to 15 percent of these new customers,” he said. “When people start going to sporting events again and living their lives as they did before, I’m hoping a lot of these folks don’t forget how much fun they had riding bikes with their family or going out in the woods and getting away from screens. I hope they continue to do that.”  Outdoor recreation advocates, event producers, and retailers discuss how the pandemic is affecting outdoor recreation in our region and where the industry is headed.  Rethinking Events Having been a part of the Atlanta running community since 1974, Ware said now the shop needs the running community’s support more than ever. “You’re seeing that across the board,” he said. “Shop local, drink local, eat local. I think that message is getting through to people and I hope they remember it after we get through the pandemic.” While in-person fittings will always be Phidippides’ bread and butter, Ware does think that the ways in which the pandemic forced them to get creative will help them serve customers unable to get into the store down the line.   When putting in a request for a permit, event producers have to demonstrate safety, security, and recycling plans. Marshall thinks they will have to demonstrate a plan for preventing the spread of diseases in the future. “I think it’s going to be very similar to how things changed after 9/11 with security and safety protocols,” she said. “I think it will change and eventually it will feel like the new normal. That’s my opinion. We were always conscious of health and cleanliness when it came to events, but I think there’s going to need to be a more outward show.” Pete Eshelman, director of the Roanoke Outside Foundation, said parks in the Roanoke, Va., area have seen anywhere from a 50-to-200-percent increase in visitation since March. At a time like this, with localities looking to cut their budgets due to a decrease in revenue, parks and rec budgets are typically the first thing on the chopping block, but Eshelman argues that now is really the time for cities and states to fund those opportunities more than ever.  This article includes the most up to date information since this issue went to press on June 18. Since that time, certain details affected by the pandemic may have changed. Please check with local regulations and organizations before making plans to get outside.  The outfitter offers a variety of activities and camping options near Harpers Ferry, W.Va., including whitewater rafting, kayak, tube, and bike rentals, and food tours. River & Trail opened up in May with new guidelines in place. For rafting trips, they’re keeping it to one group per boat. Shuttles are running at 30 percent capacity with the windows down and are sanitized after every trip. Common spaces at the campgrounds are closed and porta potties were added to each cabin. “There is just a whole lot of uncertainty,” Baihly said. “Everyone was not sure what to plan for, not sure if they should hire for all of their programs. With an outdoor business, you kind of recreate the wheel every year. You have at least a chunk of staff that’s new. So, there’s a whole lot of effort that goes into preparing for a short amount of time. The big question is what do we invest in and prepare for not knowing what kind of a season we’re going to have.” Throughout the ongoing pandemic, cities and states have experienced an increase in the number of people getting outside. With outdoor recreation considered appropriate and essential for maintaining health in almost every state, people are turning to the outdoors for physical exertion and mental wellbeing.  Amy Allison, director of North Carolina’s Outdoor Recreation Industry Office, on tourism post-pandemic: “When the restrictions start to loosen, we are going to see visitors flooding our public lands, making it more imperative than ever for us to do our part to mitigate that impact and take care of our gateway communities, our wild places, and those who work and volunteer in those areas.” Jenny Baker, host of The Georgia Jewel, on balancing work and parenthood: “As parents, we need to be present for our children. At the same time, our livelihoods are in jeopardy. How do you manage that, emotionally? Your mind is constantly on that hamster wheel of what bills can I put off, what things do I need. And then your children are home and they don’t understand things either.” When deciding to cancel or reschedule, Tes Sobomehin Marshall, race director and founder of runningnerds, looked at each of her events individually. “If it’s a fundraising event that was meant to raise money for a charity, and that’s one of their main sources of income, I think it’s important to try to figure out a way to keep people engaged,” Marshall said. “I’m not trying to force virtual events down the running community’s throat. I want to do stuff that people want.” While many of her races were canceled or turned into virtual events, Marshall is still considering what to do about her largest event. The Race, scheduled for the first weekend of October, brings in runners from across the country. Even if she can get a permit, Marshall wonders if people will show up. “We could be allowed to have an event, but are people going to sign up for it?” she said. “Are they going to feel comfortable coming out?” Andrea Hassler, executive director of Southeastern Climbers Coalition, on nonprofits: “We have seen a dip in nonprofit contributions as a result of a decrease in the economy and the instability and uncertainty of the future. Members are still willing to contribute, and they have. But without the ability to offer events in person, our fundraising is limited. I’ve also seen a decrease in the availability of grant funding for projects. A lot of corporations that typically sponsor or provide grants have diverted that funding elsewhere or do not have that funding available because of the current economy.” Cover illustration by Kevin Howdeshelllast_img read more

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CalDigit TS3 Plus Thunderbolt 3 Dock provides up to 87 watts of power delivery » Gadget Flow

first_imgThe CalDigit TS3 Plus Thunderbolt 3 Dock is designed for both Mac and PC users and provides up to 87 watts of power for your devices. Therefore, you can charge laptops in no time. In fact, this gadget extends to up to 15 ports, so you can charge numerous devices at the same time. The CalDigit TS3 Plus packs everything you need for work or leisure activities into a compact unit. In particular, it features a combination of USB-A ports and USB-C ports, allowing you to connect a variety of devices. The rear port features USB 3.1 to charge your devices quickly. You can even set this dock horizontally or vertically on your desk for convenience. Overall, this gadget makes charging your devices simpler without needing multiple adapters and plugs nearby. – Advertisement –last_img

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Steel Pan Celebration returns to Bayfront

first_imgPresident of the Steel Pan Association and Miss Plus Size and Elegant contestant Miss Claudine CharlesThe annual Steel Pan Celebration will return to its original venue when the show gets underway next week.Last year, the Steel Pan Association in collaboration with the Dominica Festivals Committee hosted a Pan Savanne Competition at the Carnival City in Pottersville which was won by the Genesis Steel Orchestra.Newly elected President of the Steel Pan Association and Miss Plus Size and Elegant contestant Claudine Charles announced earlier this week that the Association could not host the Pan Savanne Competition due to constraints and therefore have to revert to the Pan Celebration on the Dame Mary Eugenia Charles Boulevard in Roseau.Charles explained that several groups did not have sufficient time to practice and therefore had to drop out of the competition.“One of our main reasons is that one of our pan icons Mr. Andre who has been working with the Pan groups he is ill right now and that has caused a few groups to drop out like Pioneer; the kids were really looking forward to doing a presentation this year but last minute they had to drop out as well as the Brizee Steel Orchestra who had to drop out at the last minute because they are not prepared sufficiently for that.”Charles also stated that the Pan Celebration will feature the Mahaut Primary School Pan group as well as the Mahaut Senior group which are under her coordination.She says by teaching the primary school students this will assist in keeping steel pan music alive on the island. According to Charles working with these two groups has been a success as they have excelled and have made her proud.Genesis Steel Orchestra who won last year’s Pan Savanne Competition will also be featured at the Pan celebration including the Portsmouth group; two pioneering pan groups in Dominica.Charles said further that the Association has also organized a Steel Pan Float which several of the pan groups have joined.They are the Mahaut Steel Pan, Genesis and the Real Steel under the coordination of Mr. Martin. The Real Steel will be the Carnival float for jouvert as well as Carnival Monday’s parade on Monday as well as Tuesday. Charles noted that the Association is making every effort to ensure that steel pan music is forms part of the Carnival culture in Dominica. The Steel Pan Celebration is slated for February 7th on the Dame Mary Eugenia Charles Boulevard.Dominica Vibes News Share 15 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Tweetcenter_img Share Share LocalNews Steel Pan Celebration returns to Bayfront by: – February 2, 2012last_img read more

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Carib Sand and Stone Ltd undertakes tree planting exercise

first_imgLocalNews Carib Sand and Stone Ltd undertakes tree planting exercise by: – June 5, 2012 Tweet Sharing is caring! Share Carib Stand & Stone staff planting trees with students of the World Environmental UnitCarib Sand and Stone Ltd have joined forces in observing World Environment Day today, June 5th, 2012.Staff of that organization teamed up with members of the Forestry, Wildlife and Parks Division to embark upon a tree and flower planting exercise along the Pointe Michel to Loubiere road from 8 o’clock this morning.General Manager Jean-Yves Bonnaire says while quarry operations have a negative impact on the environment because vegetation has to be removed to get the raw materials, “they are not the anti-environment monsters that many think they are”.He says there are developing consciences among professionals to mitigate the impact and better prepare restoration of sites.Dr. Darroux addressing St. Luke’s Primary School students“Developing awareness among employees and associating future generations is one of the objectives of this symbolic operation, Bonnaire says.The management of Carib Sand and Stone is also calling on the road uses to assist in keeping the area free or garbage.Most of the trees planted have been tagged with the names of the individual who planted them.Carib Sand & Stone (Dominica) Ltd, was officially incorporated on December 7th, 2005 to handle the development of quarrying activities on the island of Dominica.Press Releasecenter_img Share 127 Views   no discussions Sharelast_img read more

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Police, ‘NPA’ clash in San Carlos

first_imgThe police did not receive any casualties in the gunfight. They also weren’t able to confirm if they killed or wounded any NPA rebels. Both the police and Philippine Army conducted “hot-pursuit” operations against the rebels./PN BY DOMINIQUE GABRIEL BAÑAGA BACOLOD City – Troops of Regional Mobile Force Battalion of the Police Regional Office (PRO) 6 clashed with suspected insurgents of the New People’s Army (NPA) at Sitio Masapod in Barangay Nataban, San Carlos City, Negros Occidental. In a statement, the Negros Occidental Police Provincial Office said the cops were conducting a routine patrol in the area when they encountered seven fully-armed NPA rebels early yesterday morning.center_img However, the insurgents left behind several ammunitions belonging to an M16 assault rifle; an M1 Garand; and three 40mm grenades belonging to M203 grenade launcher. Police also recovered two detonating cords, an NPA flag, an NPA cap, subversive materials, and the rebels’ personal belongings. A seven-minute gun battle ensued until the rebels retreated to the southeast direction.last_img read more

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Solskjaer compares Jordan to Sir Alex’s Man Utd

first_img The Reds boss has been inspired by the access-all-areas footage of Jordan in his prime during the 1990s, when he became an iconic figure by using his unrivalled ability to lead the Bulls to glory. In a fascinating comparison, Solskjaer admits he sees similarities between the basketball legend and his former United captain Roy Keane, who, alongside Sir Alex Ferguson, drove our great club to unprecedented success around the same time as that celebrated Chicago Bulls team. When asked on the BBC’s Football Focus programme if he has put his football duties to one side during the ongoing lockdown, Solskjaer pointed out he will always be obsessed with the beautiful game and continues to work hard. However, in his free time, he admits the Jordan miniseries has caught his attention. “No you don’t put that on hold,” Ole explained to Dan Walker. “It never stops. If you are in a job, or not in a job, but have been bitten by the football bug then you always spend time on it. “I don’t think I’ve been different to anyone else. You watch TV, you watch series, you’ve got to switch off from football then, but then you find Netflix and you find The Last Dance about Michael Jordan. It takes me back to when I was a player and the great team of Sir Alex’s. Loading… “Michael Jordan, as a leader, you think of Roy Keane straightaway. There are so many similarities to my team, seeing that [Chicago Bulls] team, so it has been inspiring and a great watch.“ Solskjaer is not the only person at United who has been inspired by The Last Dance documentary, with assistant manager Mike Phelan among those who have been tuning in and taking notes. “This is some serious TV,” he tweeted via his official account earlier this week. “The very nature of elite sport as it was intended. Get your pen and paper out and watch. More in here for any player or coach than on an y webinar or course if you can decipher it. There’s the challenge!” “You see this absolute legend of basketball, how he started, what he went through, what he had to do to get to the top of his sport, and you can’t help but be motivated.”Aaron Wan-Bissaka on watching ‘The Last Dance’Meanwhile, from the squad, Aaron Wan-Bissaka revealed to us that he’s also been motivated by Jordan’s unrelenting desire to win at all costs. “I started watching The Last Dance, a big documentary about Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls,” the young defender told us in late April. “I’m one episode in and already it’s so inspirational. read also:Sir Ferguson arrives ahead FA Derby against County “You see this absolute legend of basketball, how he started, what he went through, what he had to do to get to the top of his sport, and you can’t help but be motivated. During hard times, especially like we’re in now, it just makes you think about everything. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Like so many lovers of sport, Manchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has been binge-watching The Last Dance, a documentary series on Netflix, which chronicles the career of NBA legend Michael Jordan and has a particular focus on the Chicago Bulls’ dramatic 1997/98 season. Promoted Content10 Extremely Gorgeous Asian ActressesThe 6 Weirdest Things You Can Learn On WikiHow7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Who Earns More Than Ronaldo?Top 10 Most Romantic Nations In The World7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?8 Scenes That Prove TV Has Gone Too Far10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By OdeithAir Pollution Is Rapidly Decreasing Thanks To COVID-19last_img read more

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Mother charged after child found carrying baby through subfreezing temperatures

first_imgA mother has been charged after authorities say her children were found wondering in subfreezing temperatures after she left them alone in the home.The incident occurred on December 3rd in the Village of Venetie, Alaska.Officials say a neighbor contacted police to conduct a welfare check after a five-year-old showed up to her home carrying their 18-month-old sibling.Authorities said the older child became scared after the power went out and wearing only socks and light clothing, carried the smaller child half a mile over to the neighbor’s home.The temperature was said to be around -31 F at the time and both children suffered cold-related injuries.Officials were able to make contact with the children’s mother 37-year-old Julie Peter, who admitted to leave the children unattended. She has since been booked her in the Fairbanks Correctional Center on one charge of endangering the welfare of a child in the 1st degree.last_img read more

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Dillard High School football coach dies at age 34

first_imgMany are mourning the death of a  34-year-old high school football coach from Fort Lauderdale’s Dillard High School.Coach Eddie Frasier led the high school team to a perfect regular reason in his first year as the team’s head coach. He was named the 2019 George F. Smith High School Coach of the Year by the Miami Dolphins.The cause of death is still unknown, but NBC Miami reported it was not related to the coronavirus.We send our condolences to the Dillard High School community on the passing of Head Football Coach Eddie Frasier. pic.twitter.com/flsqu7ya8F— Miami Dolphins (@MiamiDolphins) April 13, 2020last_img

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