Month: August 2019

The next interface Electrical fields MGC3130 and your hand w Video

first_img Citation: The next interface: Electrical fields, MGC3130, and your hand (w/ Video) (2012, November 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-interface-electrical-fields-mgc3130-video.html According to the company, the MGC3130 can enable 3-D gesture recognition with power consumption as low as 150 microwatts in its active sensing state. More information: www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/ … px?dDocName=en560048 © 2012 Phys.org (Phys.org)—Microchip Technology has been working in the “non-contact user interface” space, which is translating into gesture control over your next computing device. The company is using electrical fields to sense hand movements. They have announced a controller that transmits an electrical signal and calculates the three-coordinate position of a hand based on the disturbances to the field the hand creates. Chandler, Arizona, based Microchip Technology, in looking at electrical fields to sense hand movements, issued this week’s announcement of “the world’s first electrical field based 3-D gesture controller, the MGC3130.” The new controller offers low-power, hand position tracking with gesture recognition. Its two promoted advantages are low cost and low power. The company is offering a development kit. A gesture library was constructed using algorithms that learned from how different people make the same movements, to be applied toward device functions such as .point, click, zoom, or scroll. Ten gestures were programmed into the device with recognition based on Markov models. According to the company, “the chip provides developers the flexibility to utilize pre-filtered electrode signals for additional functionality in their applications.”Gesture-recognition technology is familiar to those using game consoles, but the concept of gesture recognition could now become more mainstream with users of desktops, laptops, or smartphones, making use of gesture-control hovering motions. Microchip Technology said that it is already working with product manufacturers to implement user-input controls.The MGC3130 will cost $2.26 each in high volumes and volume production is expected in April 2013.center_img MGC3130’s design and configurable power modes represent the lowest power consumption of any 3-D sensing technology, says Microchip’s creators, and up to 90 percent lower than camera-based gesture systems.Microchip Technology is aiming its technology toward a range of devices; an easy vision of how it would translate into end use would be hand gesture recognition for smartphones and notebooks. The company said its chip will offer interaction with both mobile devices and consumer electronics. Its list of potential devices, for example, includes electronic readers, remote controls and game controllers. NEC unveils gesture controlling device This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Duo create GravityLight Lamp that runs off of gravity w video

first_img © 2012 Phys.org The dark side of kerosene lamps: High black-carbon emissions Citation: Duo create GravityLight: Lamp that runs off of gravity (w/ video) (2012, December 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-12-duo-gravitylight-lamp-gravity-video.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: www.indiegogo.com/projects/282006center_img Explore further (Phys.org)—London based designers Martin Riddiford and Jim Reeves have created what they are calling the GravityLight, an LED lamp that runs off of nothing but gravity. The purpose of the lamp is to provide people in third world countries with an alternative to kerosene lamps which cause burns and lung ailments to millions of people too poor to afford any other source of light. The lamp is as simple as it is inexpensive. A cable hangs from a gear mechanism holding onto a plastic bag filled with dirt or rocks. The energy created by gravity pulling the bag downwards is enough to power an LED bulb for up to half an hour. Riddiford and Reeves have posted their creation on the fund sourcing site indiegogo and thus far pledges have doubled the $55,000 goal.The two note on their page that over a billion and a half people in the world today have no access to a reliable electricity source. When it gets dark, their only light source comes through burning wood, peat, or other biomass materials – the most popular by far, is kerosene. They also note that the World Bank has recently estimated that up to three quarters of a billion women and children regularly inhale smoke from kerosene lanterns, which is they say, equivalent to smoking two packs of cigarettes a day – a situation that leads quite naturally to very high lung cancer rates. Also, millions of people are burned each year when kerosene lamps are accidently upended. There’s also the problem of carbon dioxide being added to the atmosphere – collectively about 244 million tonnes a year. All in all they paint a very dire picture. To help fix the problem, the two have spent the past four years looking for and building various lighting options and have now settled on their GravityLight.Their lamp has no batteries and is made in a way the two say will last for a very long time. The weight that drives the lamp is free and collectable virtually anywhere and providing a lamp that doesn’t have any recurring costs will allow, the two say, those that have relied on kerosene lamps to use the money they have been spending on fuel, for other essentials. The overall goal is an improved quality of life.The two expect the GravityLight to originally sell for just $10. After ramping up, they expect that cost to drop to just $5.last_img read more

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Genome study reveals history of European potato

first_img Explore further © 2019 Science X Network Journal information: Nature Ecology & Evolution Credit: CC0 Public Domain A team of researchers from Germany, Peru, the U.K. and Spain has sequenced a large number of potato varieties to learn more about the history of the modern European potato. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the group describes their study of the history of the potato and what they found. More information: Rafal M. Gutaker et al. The origins and adaptation of European potatoes reconstructed from historical genomes, Nature Ecology & Evolution (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41559-019-0921-3center_img Citation: Genome study reveals history of European potato (2019, June 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-genome-reveals-history-european-potato.html Discovery of genetic mechanism allowing potato cultivation in northern latitudes This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Prior research has shown that the potato was introduced to Europe in the 1600s—the first-known plantings were in Spain. The history of the potato in Europe after introduction has not been well studied, however, until now. In this new effort, the researchers sequenced several varieties of potato to learn more about how the modern European potato came to exist.Prior study had shown that the potatoes that first made their way to Europe came from somewhere in the Andes mountains, near the equator. Because of the difference in day length, this suggests that some adaptation must have occurred to allow the potato to survive in Europe. Also, potato plants that grow in the Andes are able to produce potatoes all year long, whereas in Europe, potatoes grow in the spring, summer and fall, and are harvested before winter. To learn more about the genetic adaptions the plants underwent, the researchers obtained 88 samples of modern potatoes and specimens saved during the years 1660 to 1896. All of the samples were then sequenced.The researchers found that the potatoes in Europe were originally nearly identical to those in the Andes. But over time, genetic changes crept in—a variant of the gene CDF1 appeared, for example, a change that allowed the potato to adapt to the European summer. Potatoes native to Chile have a similar adaptation, which quite naturally led to questions about whether potatoes from that region might have been imported. Further testing showed differences in the variants indicating that they developed independently.The researchers also found evidence of other changes that occurred to European potatoes in the mid-1800s. They suspect this occurred as farmers began breeding them with South American varieties to combat the blight that led to the potato famine. They also found signs of interbreeding during the 20th century as farmers once again tried to make their crops more resistant to diseases.last_img read more

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What Dropping 17000 Wallets Around The Globe Can Teach Us About Honesty

first_imgThe experiment started small, with a research assistant in Finland turning in a few wallets with different amounts of money. He would walk up to the counter of a big public place, like a bank or a post office. And would that answer be different if it was empty or full of cash? Those are questions researchers have been exploring; Thursday, they published their findings in the journal Science. So picture this: You’re a receptionist at, say, a hotel. Someone walks in and says they found a lost wallet but they’re in a hurry. They hand it to you. What would you do?center_img “Acting as a tourist, he mentioned that he found the wallet outside around the corner, and then he asked the employees to take care of it,” says Alain Cohn from the University of Michigan, the study’s lead author. The researchers assumed that putting money in the wallet would make people less likely to return it, because the payoff would be bigger. A poll of 279 “top-performing academic economists” agreed. Read the whole story: NPRlast_img read more

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For the love of nature

For nature lovers in and around Delhi, here’s another treat, as the second International Nursery and Landscape Expo starts here. At this four-day event, unique species of plants from all over the world will be exhibited. This event is the first of its kind to be done in the Capital.The exhibits will be displayed in the NSIC ground and will witness a participation of about 50 nursery workers from all over the country. Organised by the Nurserymen Contractors Association, State Nurserymen Welfare Association of Delhi and Redmax Media Private Limited, it is a nursery and horticulture trade show. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ ‘In a country like India where gardening has mostly been considered as a hobby for some individuals, the Nursery and Landscape Expo seeks to add a commercial dimension to it,’ said Rakesh Saini, one of the members of the organising committee.‘The expo will feature different varieties of plants from all over the world. Some of the unique plant species such as Splendid Pitcher Plant, Sundews, Makahiya or Sensitive Plant will also be put on exhibition for common visitors,’ he added. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThere will also be renowned agriculture scientists and horticulture experts who will address and inform the audience on varieties of fruits, vegetables, tuber crops, floriculture, ornamental plants, medicinal and aromatic plants, spices, food processing and bee keeping. It will also provide avenues for new trends as a viable economic activity in the country. Various workshop on Ikebana [flower arrangement] and on growing plants on rock will also be organised. ‘India has an age-old tradition of nursery and impressive landscapes but with the rapid pace of urbanisation, having a garden in big cities like Delhi has become a sort of luxury. Rising per capita income and progressive lifestyle, however, have paved the way for phenomenal increase in the nursery and landscape in the country,’ said Saini. Some of the plants you should watch out for are a 50 year-old Ficus Retusa, a Bonsai plant, which will be featured in the upcoming expo. So take a look. It might just have what you want for your garden. Here’s to a happy date with greenary.DETAILAt:  NSIC Exhibition Complex, Okhla When: 18 to 21 OctoberTimings: 11am to 7 pmPhone: 24638096 read more

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Getting stalled at fashion week

At the just concluded Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week Spring Summer 2013, it wasn’t only the ramp shows that grabbed our attention. With more than a 100 designers displaying their wares at the stalls, lovers of high fashion had a lot to feast one. Here is our pick of the stalls. While some were different, others we liked for their quirky charm. Read on to find out why.NITIN BAL CHAUHANQuirky cool is how Nitin Bal Chauhan’s collection can be best described. His stall showed off items from his new label called Bhoot Sawaar. Dresses, long T-shirts, jackets, trousers and tees had quirky graffiti and images digitally printed on them. Chauhan used handcrafted trims and rivets inspired from punk and rock. There were metallic details and even safety pins added to the ensembles to add to the quirky coolness. Prints like those of Goddess Kali, skulls and Jesus wearing a crown of guitars added to the X-factor. Music was a big influence on the collection. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’CHANDRANI SIINGH FLLORAWhen most stalls were high on bling with Indianwear, Chandrani Siingh Fllora’s stall came as a welcome relief to those who like Westernwear. Comprising mostly pret, her collection spoke of ‘peace’. The theme was replicated in the ensembles through the bird pigeon, which was the leitmotif of the collection. The colours were soft, the fabrics fluid and the silhouettes flowy. Peach, beige, white grey with bursts of blue and green made up the colour palette. Fabrics used were net, georgettes and cotton. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixASHA AND GAUTAM GUPTAThe use of bright and vibrant colours is what made Asha and Gautam Gupta’s collection stand out. Chilly Strawberry is what the collection was called and it comprised jackets, hot pants, tunics, kaftans, drape saris with ruffles, lehengas and gowns. The designer duo from Greater Kailash used Indian textiles like kalamkari, batik and blends like cotton linen, georgette and cotton satin. The ensembles were jazzed up using self-created digital prints inspired by everything from African tribal to floral to mosaic to effect-like splash and drops in bright tones of neon greens, prussian blue, electric blue, aqua, pale orange, emerald green, mango green, icy green etc. NIHARIKA PANDEYTucked away in one corner, one would have missed out Niharika Pandey’s stall but for the quirkiness of it. The young designer, who is based in Shahpur Jat, had a stall full of colourful creations. Apart from clothes, Pandey also designed bags. There were velvet trimmings and cutwork in the creations that were dominated by shades of maroon and green. The collection was about being happy and to recreate that, she used music symbols and hibiscus flowers. read more

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Weaving stories into art

first_imgIf you ask them, people will give you varied definitions of what feminism means to them. For some it is raising their voice for equality for women, for some it is a fight for removal of patriarchy and for some it is resistance to any sort of inequality.  Baaraan Ijlal, a visual artist, sees feminism as a part of people’s struggle, for her feminism takes a form of visual expression on her canvas. Weaving stories of people that affect her and intricately painting them on her canvas is Ijlal’s form of expression against all strands of inequality she sees around irrespective of people’s sex or sexuality. This is what she explained to us at a discussion on canvas writing at the Oxford Bookstore. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The discussion was organised in association with Apne Aap Women Wordwide in continuation of their series of Feminism Beyond Boundaries. Art for Ijlal is very personal, she tries to bring out people’s pain through her paintings. She says that her pieces are a reaction to the ongoing struggle of people she sees around her. Describing a painting of hers where a red-haired passenger is sitting on the backseat of a bicycle, she says that the met the owner of that bicycle in a ghetto. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix She says that the boy-faced man with long hair which slightly curled at the end was sitting sipping his tea and staring intently at his bicycle which had a tightly screwed red tin box tied to the rear end. When Ijlal asked him about his story, he said that the bicycle was given to him by his lover as a parting gift. The emotions attached to that object and the inner struggle of the cyclist struck her where he symbolically reserved a seat for his lover at the end with the red tin box and she  drew out that emotion her canvas and filled in the colours. Ijlal says her canvas is an instrument to fight for justice. When asked more she explained, ‘I try to fight for justice because I have seen fairness. I have seen my parents always stand up for justice no matter what.’ And the lessons she has grown up with find expression in the works she creates on canvas. Ijlal owes the narrative style of her work to the early influences of writers such as Manto, Albert Camus, Garcia Marquez and Faiz Ahmad Faiz. These and many other early influences have inspired this artist to create a space where she can tell her stories, and stories of others, on canvas, where language is not a barrier, where possibilities are endless and where cultural and social taboos are challenged constantly.last_img read more

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The éclair affair

first_imgLe Meridien Hotels and Resorts hosted the world renowned pastry chef and LM100 member Johnny Iuzzini in New Delhi to reinvent the signature Le Meridien Éclair. To commemorate the India chapter of the Le Meridien’s Éclair Diaries, Chef Johnny showcased modern takes on the brand’s signature éclairs through a charismatic and engaging master class for the Indian audience. Through this culinary collaboration, Chef Iuzzini will create eight seasonal éclair recipes exclusively for the brand, inspired by his travels across various Le Méridien destinations across the world. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Le Meridien is committed to unlocking the destination through locally-inspired cuisine and the exclusive Masterclass saw Chef Johnny reinventing the brand’s signature éclair with the help of the hotels’s talented chefs. Leading food and beverage personalities were intrigued to be part of this creative yet delicious session.As part of the brand’s new culinary program, Le Méridien hotels and resorts worldwide offers guests, the opportunity to indulge in a variety of modern twists on the chic Parisian treat, including both classic flavours as well as unique creations inspired by the destination. The Éclair Diaries kicked off in San Francisco on July 10 where Chef Iuzzini started travelling around the globe, discovering local regions on a motorcycle to uncover local flavours for his inspiration to curate éclair recipes. Johnny’s Éclair Diaries will continue throughout 2014 and 2015 with additional stops being announced from time to time. As part of his India travel he showcased Éclairs inspired by San Fransisco at Le Meridien, Delhi during his visit. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixLe Méridien hotels around the world will continue to feature a variety of destination-inspired éclairs by their own chefs, offering guests an authentic taste of the local culture. Le Méridien New Delhi will feature the Jaggery Ginger Éclair, Rose Cardamom Éclair and Clotted Cream Kalakand Éclair to unlock the flavours of Delhi and Hazelnut Tamarind Éclair from Le Royal Meridien Chennai and Coconut Jaggery Cardamom from Le Meridien Kochi.last_img read more

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Cornered India seek revival of fortunes in Boxing Day Test

first_imgIndia have an unenviable task of avoiding the prospect of relinquishing their grip on the Border-Gavaskar Trophy when they square off against Australia in the third Test of the four-match series at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) on Friday.Having lost the first two Tests, India would be aware that another loss would help Australia reclaim the coveted trophy they are competing for.But despite the ominous stare at another humiliation and the lopsidedness of the contest that the 2-0 scoreline suggests, it hasn’t been all too easy for the hosts. On the contrary, the series has seen an intriguing contest. The Adelaide Test produced a compelling battle on the backdrop of utmost grief and sadness following the untimely death of Phillip Hughes. Brisbane was an extension of that competitiveness. Also Read – Khel Ratna for Deepa and Bajrang, Arjuna for JadejaFor Australia, it’s simply a matter of producing more of the same at Melbourne despite having to rejig the winning combination due to the absence of the injured Mitchell Marsh. The 25-year-old Joe Burns will take his place, as is fit-again pacer Ryan Harris instead of Michell Starc.Australian skipper Steven Smith on Thursday cleverly intensified the mind games, saying that India are “whingeing and complaining among themselves”, turning the focus towards the visitors’ on the question of sledging. Also Read – Endeavour is to facilitate smooth transition: Shastri“At the moment, the Indians are doing that themselves. They’re doing a lot of whingeing and complaining among themselves. They’re doing it all for us. Hopefully that can hinder them this week,” he said.India though have more pressing issues to address, beginning with the form of opener Shikhar Dhawan and middle-order batsman Rohit Sharma, whose only ‘contribution’ so far has been to fire up opponent pacer Mitchell Johnson with some unsolicitated sledging. He seemed clueless in the middle, a far cry from his record-breaking One-Day International (ODI) knock of 264 at the flat track of Eden Gardens. DhawanÂ’s tour has taken a similar route, with no worthwhile contribution with the bat. But more alarming is the shambolic way in which his arm injury of a spurred up Johnson delivery was handled, giving birth to a petty controversy that threatens to unsettle the team, as a fallout of the usually astute skipper’s surprising ‘unrest’ comment.Dhoni was quick to downplay the effects of his revealing comment, saying reports of a dressing room disquiet were “made up stories”, also defending his team’s ploy of sustained chattering on the field.“There haven’t been any formal complaints from our side so far. If I respond to that, it won’t be an adequate response. I feel a bit of chirping is good on the field. That’s what makes cricket interesting. If the guidelines are followed, I’m not really bothered. The chirping has nothing to do with our performance.”India failed to grab the initiative at the Gabba when Australia were 247 for six, and allowed the tail to wag doggedly, missing a wonderful opportunity to set Australia a more imposing fourth innings target. That should be more painful than the defeat, as they did all the hard work diligently to show that Australia are vulnerable if subjected to pressure.last_img read more

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Ushering in Poila Baisakh TMC organises peace rally

first_imgKolkata: A colourful procession was organised in north Kolkata to welcome Bengali New Year and to create social awareness and communal harmony among the people on Sunday.The rally was organised by Mohan Gupta, Trinamool Congress councillor of ward 17. It was attended by more than 1,000 local people. Sudip Bandyopadhyay, local MP and Shashi Panja local MLA took part in the procession.The participants wore colouful dresses and many of them sang Rabindra Sangeet. Tribal dance added colour to the rally. Like every year the Charak festival was held at Chatubabu and latubabur bazar. Those who took part in Charak showed some rare physical fits. The Charak festival on Beadon Street is over 100 years old. The leaders urged the people to live peacefully and spread the message of communal peace and harmony.last_img read more

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