Tag: 南京夜生活

Commentary College football Rivalry Weekend again proves every week matters

Auburn junior quarterback Nick Marshall (14) breaks a tackle during a game against Georgia Nov. 16 at Jordan-Hare Stadium. Auburn won, 43-38.Credit: Courtesy of MCTCollege football is funny.A sport that brings joy and despair to people across the country week in and week out, the game is particularly dubious on the final weekend of the regular season.Known as “Rivalry Weekend,” the final Saturday before the 2013 postseason did not disappoint either.From an Ohio State’s fan perspective, emotional highs and lows ensued from defeating archrival Michigan in Ann Arbor in thrilling fashion — picking off redshirt-junior Wolverine quarterback Devin Gardner in the end zone to deny Michigan the necessary two points that would give them the victory.Fans, players and the like were proud because the Buckeyes had just recorded their 24th straight win under coach Urban Meyer, but also turned their attention quickly to another rivalry game — The Iron Bowl.The same could be said for both myself and my colleagues at The Lantern, who had just left Michigan Stadium with the knowledge that No. 1 Alabama held a touchdown advantage over No. 4 Auburn. Upon tuning into the game on the radio and hearing that the Tigers had tied it up with 32 seconds to go, we made the correct decision to U-turn into the closest restaurant with a TV (Red Robin) because seeing if the unthinkable could happen — The Crimson Tide no longer rolling — was something we could not miss.All year, OSU has been slotted behind the top-ranked Tide and No. 2 Florida State, who had already taken care of business against rival Florida earlier in the day to finish regular season play unbeaten. So, if the Buckeyes were to even get a chance to compete for the final BCS National Championship, ‘Bama was going to need to either fall Saturday or next week in the SEC Title game. It seems unthinkable that an undefeated OSU would be left out of the national championship game, but because of the national perspective of the Big Ten as second tier to other conferences like the SEC, the possibility was at its highest point.Then lightning struck.While we were waiting to order our food, the referees put one second back on the clock, giving Alabama a chance to save its unbeaten season in regulation. Alabama coach Nick Saban turned to redshirt-freshman kicker Adam Griffith to attempt a 57-yard field goal for the win. Griffith’s attempt was short, Auburn senior cornerback Chris Davis retrieved it, and returned it 100 yards for the game-winning touchdown.Red Robin, filled with members of Buckeye Nation, exploded — and I couldn’t help myself but join in on the excitement.With a win against Michigan State in the Big Ten Championship game, the Buckeyes — barring any sort of BCS catastrophe that will allow a one-loss Auburn team to jump them in the rankings — will be heading to Pasadena, Calif., in early 2014 in search of the program’s eighth national championship.In a mere four hours, Buckeye fans went from holding their breath when Gardner took the snap on the two-point play, to extreme jubilation when Alabama’s undefeated season was no more. Suddenly, seeing OSU back at the top of the sport is a very real possibility.As a journalist writing on deadline for the OSU-Michigan game, the last half of The Game’s fourth quarter brought stress to both my fingers and head.But as a college football fan, rivalry weekend proved once again why the sport is tough to be topped. read more

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Thad Matta Ohio State look to rebound against Indiana

Thad Matta stands on the sidelines during a game against Minnesota. OSU won, 64-46.Credit: Ritika Shah / Asst. photo editorWhen a college basketball game is closing on the the final minutes of play, most coaches would say each possession becomes increasingly more important.The value of making the correct read, protecting the ball, making free throws and getting good shots goes up in such a way that if a team fails to do those things, they are likely to end up on the wrong side of the scoreboard when the buzzer sounds.Ohio State coach Thad Matta said Saturday doing the little things — like converting free throws, keeping proper spacing on offense and defending to his team’s capability — is what ultimately led to its 65-63 loss Thursday night against Penn State.Even junior guard Shannon Scott knew something was off that night in State College, Pa., mentioning that at times when the Buckeyes (22-7, 9-7, fourth in the Big Ten) were trying to decipher the Nittany Lions’ zone defense, not everyone was on the same page.“We’re not seeing it all the way the whole time. There’s been possessions where three players are running one play, and two players are running a different play,” Scott said Saturday. “We’ve gotta have a better focus on our offense, especially against the zone.”When Matta was told that Scott said the team sometimes has trouble getting into the right sets offensively — even though the team is 29 games into the season — he said it shows how OSU’s mind wasn’t in the right place against Penn State.“That just tells you the concentration wasn’t there. And a lot of that is on Shannon and (senior guard) Aaron (Craft). We were going way too quick the other night,” Matta said. “We had a guy stop and tie his shoe twice during the game, and we didn’t start our offense until there was 22 seconds on the clock. We had wasted possessions on those two possessions.”The No. 22 Buckeyes are likely going to need to have those little things corrected when they are set to travel to Bloomington, Ind., to take on Indiana (16-12, 6-9, eighth in the Big Ten). The Hoosiers won the Big Ten regular season title last year, beating the Buckeyes by a game in the standings.OSU’s second loss this season to Penn State this year was not exactly what the Buckeyes had planned, Scott said, but there’s no time to worry about that with a quick turnaround to take on Indiana.“It cuts us deep, losing another game. But we can’t really dwell on it. It’s too late in the season to start dwelling on our mistakes,” Scott said. “It’s not time for that right now. We gotta all be men and move on from that and make the most of our next games.”Despite falling to Penn State Thursday, OSU would still be the fourth seed in the Big Ten Tournament — and get a first-round bye — if the season ended today, because Iowa also lost Thursday, on the road at Indiana.The Hoosiers are led by sophomore guard Kevin “Yogi” Ferrell, who is currently fourth in the Big Ten in scoring, averaging 17.6 points per game.“Ferrell is obviously one of the top point guards in the country and (freshman forward Noah) Vonleh is a monster,” Matta said of the Hoosiers two leading scorers. “Just a well-coached basketball team, very good basketball team and it’s another Big Ten war for us.”Despite their record, Indiana isn’t going to be an easy opponent, Scott said.“We know none of our games are going to get easier. Indiana’s a great team,” Scott said. “Their record doesn’t show how good they really are, so we all know that coming into the game. We’re going to be prepared for them and hopefully be ready to play.”The loss to Penn State came on the heels of six wins in seven games for OSU, but Matta said he’s not concerned about his team’s confidence level.“It’s funny because with this quick turnaround, I’m not even worried about confidence,” Matta said. “Our focus is quite honestly, ‘Hey that’s behind us. We can’t change that. Here’s what we gotta do to try to win the basketball game’ … In terms of being 25 games or whatever we are into the season, come on — you gotta man up. You gotta carry your weight around here and get the job done.”Tipoff is set for 4 p.m. Sunday at Assembly Hall. read more

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NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Full-Time Administrative Assistant at Heilind ElectronicsFull-Time Customer Service Representative at Heilind ElectronicsPart-Time Cashier at Panera BreadPart-Time Food Production Associate at Panera BreadFull-Time Cell Leader at KochFull-Time Molecular Biologist at ChemGenesFull-Time Shipper & Receiver at Parts 4 HeatingFull-Time Sales Support at ComcastFull-Time Office Manager at Super Service TodayFull-Time Class A Driver at PODS(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 10 Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

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Blame Mark Hamill for the Jar Jar Binks Twitter trend

first_imgJar Jar Binks in The Phantom Menace. Video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET The most-derided character in the Star Wars universe isn’t villainous Darth Vader. It’s awkward Jar Jar Binks. Many people were mystified to see the character’s name trending Monday on Twitter. Thanks a lot, Mark Hamill.All of our traumatic Jar Jar Binks Star Wars prequel memories are suddenly back due to a tweet Hamill sent early Monday. It features a game that generates your Star Wars fate when you choose a phrase connected to your birth month and combine it with a Star Wars character connected to the first letter of your name.  0 TV and Movies 27 Photos Not everyone welcomed the alien. “As if Monday wasn’t annoying enough, then you see that Jar Jar Binks is trending,” tweeted another.  Perhaps Jar Jar Binks trending on a Twitter is a sign from the universe that it’s time for us to make peace with the character. Jar Jar Binks, those scripts weren’t your fault. I forgive you. But I’m also glad I wasn’t born in May and that my name doesn’t start with “J.” As if Monday wasn’t annoying enough, then you see that Jar Jar Binks is trending.— Dashley Driveby 👣 (@DashleyDriveby) July 8, 2019 I have no idea why it’s trending, but Jar Jar Binks is the hero we need— Matthew Pate (@MatthewCP8) July 8, 2019 Hamill’s Star Wars fate image seems to have originated with an entertainment site called The Dad, which focuses on jokes, memes and stories for and about fathers. A lot of people are now discovering their Star Wars fates aren’t what they imagined. Actor and comedian Jon Cryer isn’t taking the news of his parentage well. He’s apparently the son the Jar Jar Binks. “Noooooooooooooooo,” he responded. Post a comment For example, my Star Wars fate is “Trained in the force by Han Solo.” Interesting, but not bad. But somebody born in August with a first name of “James” would end up with “Married to Jar Jar Binks.””I refuse to be distracted by such meaningless, moronic time-wasters (especially since my home planet was blown up by an unnamed stormtrooper),” Hamill wrote, setting off a cascade of distraction among his Twitter followers.Jar Jar Binks’ reappearance has left some a bit puzzled. “I have no idea why it’s trending, but Jar Jar Binks is the hero we need,” tweeted one fan. Share your voice Tags I refuse to be distracted by such meaningless, moronic time-wasters (especially since my home planet was blown up by an unnamed stormtrooper).#FickleFingerOfFate 🖕 pic.twitter.com/JnlevrCNpo— Mark Hamill (@HamillHimself) July 8, 2019 My father turns out to be Jar Jar Binks?!?Noooooooooooooooo https://t.co/gmrFrQyAC7— Jon Cryer (@MrJonCryer) July 8, 2019 Cosmic dead ringers: 27 super strange-looking space objects Mark Hamill Star Wars Twitterlast_img read more

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Amid Gathering Of World Leaders Trumps Meeting With Putin Stands Out

first_imgMandel Ngan/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Trump boards Air Force One before departing from Morristown Municipal Airport in New Jersey over the weekend. Trump is meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, among other heads of state, at the G-20 summit.President Trump arrives in Poland on Wednesday afternoon. Over the next few days, he’ll be attending a Group of 20 summit and meeting with a wide array of world leaders.It’s likely none of those meetings will be more closely scrutinized than Trump’s first face-to-face sit-down with Russian President Vladimir Putin.Trump has often said he would like to see closer ties between the U.S. and Russia. But that has been complicated by Russia’s meddling in the 2016 presidential election.Throughout the campaign, Trump routinely praised Putin as a strong leader, often contrasting him with then-President Barack Obama.“I think in terms of leadership, he’s getting an A, and our president is not doing so well,” Trump told Bill O’Reilly of Fox News in 2015.Now that Trump is in office, national security adviser H.R. McMaster says, he has pursued a two-track approach with Russia: looking for areas in which the two countries can cooperate, while confronting the Russians for their bad behavior around the world.It’s a mixed message, and Trump himself has tended to highlight the cooperative part.“They’re a very powerful nuclear country and so are we,” Trump told reporters at a news conference in February. “If we have a good relationship with Russia, believe me, that’s a good thing, not a bad thing.”Meanwhile, confronting the Russians has largely been left to others in the administration. After a chemical weapons strike in April by Russian ally Syria, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson complained that U.S.-Russia relations had hit a low point. Trump retaliated for the attack by launching a volley of cruise missiles at a Syrian air base. And Tillerson accused Russia of failing to enforce Syria’s chemical weapons agreement.“It is unclear whether Russia failed to take this obligation seriously or if Russia has been incompetent,” Tillerson told Group of Seven foreign ministers. “But this distinction doesn’t much matter to the dead.”Russia also continues to draw international criticism for its occupation of Crimea, its ongoing interference in Ukraine and its political meddling in the U.S. and elsewhere.“You have seen me bash Russia on Ukraine,” U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told the House Foreign Affairs Committee on June 28. “You’ve seen me bash Russia on Syria. You’ve seen me call out Russia if we see any sort of wrongdoings by Russia. And, yes, I do think Russia meddled in our elections. And, yes, I’ve said that to the president.”It’s that last charge that makes Trump’s meeting with Putin especially fraught. The president continues to challenge the conclusion of U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia interfered in the U.S. election to boost his chances of winning. And he fired the FBI director who was investigating possible ties between Russia and the Trump campaign.A day after that firing, Russian agencies shared photos of an apparently chummy meeting Trump held in the Oval Office with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak. That makes the optics of this Putin meeting especially important.“It’s not going to be good for the president’s standing back at home if the pictures that come out of that meeting have a smiling, jovial President Trump yukking it up with President Putin the same way that you had the pictures come out of the Oval Office with President Trump and Foreign Minister Lavrov,” said Steven Pifer, a retired foreign service officer who oversaw Russian affairs for the National Security Council during the Clinton administration.Many members of Congress want the Trump White House to adopt a tougher stance on Russia. Last month, the Senate voted overwhelmingly to impose new sanctions on Moscow and make it harder for the White House to relax existing penalties.Michael O’Hanlon of the Brookings Institution says that even if Trump wants to forge a more cooperative relationship with Putin, political pressures in the U.S. leave him little room to maneuver.“Trump can’t afford to put out any new ideas that he and Putin could engage on, because it’s going to seem like he’s just beholden to Putin or he’s still in Putin’s pocket,” O’Hanlon said. “So he’s got to make a pretty firm statement in this meeting of being frustrated and angered by Russia’s behavior.”In his February news conference, Trump acknowledged it might not be possible to build a better relationship with Russia, but he blamed that not on Russia’s conduct, but on the news media’s.“The false, horrible, fake reporting makes it much harder to make a deal with Russia,” the president said.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more

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Ushering in Poila Baisakh TMC organises peace rally

first_imgKolkata: A colourful procession was organised in north Kolkata to welcome Bengali New Year and to create social awareness and communal harmony among the people on Sunday.The rally was organised by Mohan Gupta, Trinamool Congress councillor of ward 17. It was attended by more than 1,000 local people. Sudip Bandyopadhyay, local MP and Shashi Panja local MLA took part in the procession.The participants wore colouful dresses and many of them sang Rabindra Sangeet. Tribal dance added colour to the rally. Like every year the Charak festival was held at Chatubabu and latubabur bazar. Those who took part in Charak showed some rare physical fits. The Charak festival on Beadon Street is over 100 years old. The leaders urged the people to live peacefully and spread the message of communal peace and harmony.last_img read more

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Awareness campaign on animal welfare for students

first_imgKolkata: The students going to the residential schools under Sarba Siksha Mission will be made aware of animal welfare.There are 25 residential schools under the mission. The decision was taken following a meeting between Kartick Manna, president of Sarba Siksha Mission and representatives of Love and care for Animals, an NGO working in the field of animal welfare. The duration of the awareness course will be for two years.The students will be made aware about the animal welfare laws and there will be interactive sessions and Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedslide shows.Quiz competitions will be held on the matter that will be shown.Awareness classes have already been held in some state-run schools in South and North 24-Parganas and Kolkata.People working on animal welfare said because of sustained programmes, attacks on stray dogs in Kolkata have gone down.Earlier, many people used to sprinkle boiled water on them and used to tie crackers to their tails and set them on fire. Frightened stray dogs used to run away and many of them got killed.Susmita Roy a spokesman for Love and Care for Animals said the students show great interest in the awareness classes. “If they are trained in school days they will develop love for the pets and stray animals,” she said adding “this is very important at a time when deserting pets, particularly when they grow old, has reached an alarming level in the country and alsoin Kolkata.”last_img read more

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December 18 2002 East Crescent has been a focal

first_imgDecember 18, 2002 East Crescent has been a focal point of Arcosanti construction for many years. Construction of the second half has picked up momentum. [Photo: David Tollas & text:T] Soleri discusses the strategy with the Sicilian construction impresario Salvatore. [Photo: David Tollas & text:T] “All quiet on the construction front” in anticipation of the 60-yard pour with imminent arrival of the casting arsenals. [Photo: David Tollas & text:T]last_img

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Todays article comes to us from world traveler a

first_img[Today’s article comes to us from world traveler and quintessential “international man” Dr. Jack Wheeler.] Jamestown, St. Helena, South Atlantic Ocean. If you have ever heard of this little 47 square mile island lost in a vast sea, 1,200 miles west of Africa and 1,800 miles east of Brazil, it’s because here is where the British exiled Napoleon after Waterloo, and here is where he died. The 5.5 years of Napoleon’s exile – October 15, 1815 to his death on May 5, 1821 – dominate the island’s 500-year history. For the last 354 years, since 1659, it has been a British possession. Yet such is the grip of Napoleon that the Brits ceded the home and property of where he lived in exile on St. Helena – called Longwood House – to the government of France. It is French territory, as is his original burial place nearby. Moreover, there is a Consul appointed by the French government, who lives in a diplomat’s mansion on the island. Personally, I have no regard for a megalomaniac responsible for the deaths of millions of people. The Brits should have treated him as a war criminal, executed him by firing squad aboard a ship far out to sea, and dumped his body in the ocean. But no. Instead the Brits treated this mass murderer, because he called himself “Emperor” and dressed himself in ermine robes, with the same honor and respect as if he were royalty. This has tainted St. Helena and its people ever since. You have to wonder though, after learning the island’s history, whether it has been tainted from the beginning. This place is a paradise – or rather, it’s a place that always could have been but never was. The people of St. Helena like to call themselves “Saints.” In a number of odd and interesting ways, they are the saints who lost paradise. And it turns out those ways are very relevant and instructive for us today. The folks who originally made it a paradise were the Portuguese. A captain named João da Nova returning from India was blown off course in 1502, and discovered an uninhabited island which he named St. Helena (the mother of Roman Emperor Constantine who converted him to Christianity) as it was her Saint’s Day (May 21). He had meant to keep a course up Africa’s west coast, but realized the prevailing winds (the southeast trades) made it quicker and easier to sail via this island that was lush and verdant, with a perfect climate for growing anything, and that no one knew about. The Portuguese converted it into a replenishment station to resupply ships on the way back home from India, planting fruit trees (fig, lemon, orange, pomegranate), plus vegetables and herbs, and left pigs and goats to breed – all for food for ships’ crews. They never colonized it nor built a settlement, and kept it a secret for 86 years. Then a British captain, Thomas Cavendish, found it in 1588, and soon British pirates used it to waylay Portuguese ships heavily laden with riches from the East. When the Dutch learned of St. Helena, they began fighting the Brits over it, and the Portuguese left in disgust that their peaceful paradise was spoiled. Even though the Brits and Dutch fought over it, strangely enough neither settled there, until 1659 when the British East India Company landed the first people to ever live on St. Helena. The fruit trees were flourishing, plenty of pigs and goats to eat (not to mention swarms of fish in the sea), plenty of water, forests, fertile land – and somehow these folks, even with African slaves, managed to go hungry. In 1672, the first of many mutinies and rebellions occurred, when the settlers seized the East India Company’s Governor of the island and shipped him back to England. Settlers and soldiers stationed by the Company mutinied and forcibly removed subsequent Governors in 1674, 1684, and 1693. The Company insisted a large contingent of soldiers was necessary to guard the island, among whom drunkenness was a constant problem. Whenever there wasn’t enough booze (rum shipped from the Caribbean or an island-made tequila distilled from fermented prickly pear juice), they would threaten to mutiny. The biggest was the Christmas Mutiny of 1783, after which ten soldiers were hung. All through this, the settlers and their slaves couldn’t manage to adequately feed and work for themselves. So in 1810, the Company imported hundreds of Chinese laborers. When Napoleon arrived in 1815, they built Longwood House and cultivated its gardens. The British spent a fortune guarding Napoleon to prevent his escaping as he had previously at Elba (an island just off the west coast of Italy, easy to escape from). 2,000 more soldiers were stationed on the island, and Royal Navy ships constantly patrolled the coastline. Napoleon and his entourage dined with fine cuisine and wines every night. He had his personal library of 1,847 books, he dictated his memoirs, his entourage doted on him, he had a life of peace and leisure. Yet he deteriorated rapidly. There are many contemporary drawings of him at Longwood, showing him getting fatter, older, and more depressed with each year. By 1820, he looked like an aged old man. When he died of stomach cancer the next year, he was 51 years old. The Brits withdrew their guarding soldiers and patrolling ships, and the islanders slid back into their usual poverty. In 1832, the East India Company turned control of the island to the Crown. St. Helena became a British Crown Colony and slavery was abolished, with 2,200 African slaves (one third of the population) liberated. The Colony was instructed to become self-sufficient – which, after an almost unbroken string of failed attempts, it has proved unable to do so to this day. From the 1840s through the 1870s, every attempt to establish the island as a whaling center failed. In 1869, the Suez Canal opened, so ships had no need to go around Africa (and stop at the island) to get to and from the Orient. More isolated than ever, the islanders turned to flax. Seedlings were imported from New Zealand, and grew like weeds. Flax mills were built to convert flax into fiber for rope and twine. Flax, however, is a plantation plant harvested with mechanization. On the mountainous slopes of the island, it could only be harvested by hand. Excepting a few rare interludes over the next 90 years, the flax industry could only be supported by government subsidy, and collapsed immediately after the subsidy was finally withdrawn in 1966. An attempt at establishing a lace-making industry failed in 1907, followed by the failure of a fish-canning factory in 1909. The islanders, it seems, just weren’t very good at catching fish. They never have been, accounting for the failure of another fish cannery in 1957. Another thing Saints have never been any good at is growing food. Valleys once full of groves of fruit trees left by the Portuguese became dead and stony due to neglect. Land cleared for pasture was allowed to erode away. The islanders were as bad at farming and husbandry as they were at fishing. They’ve been like that since the 1660s and are now. Most fruit, such as lemons and oranges, are imported today. It’s the same with most meat and vegetables, imported from South Africa. Tristan’s 262 people can feed themselves in a far harsher environment, but St. Helena, with some 3,000 people and thousands of acres of far more fertile land, cannot. What could account for centuries of incompetence and failure on this lush, beautiful island? What happened last week, before we got here, might help explain. A large cruise ship arrived, enroute to Cape Town, carrying 900 passengers. Not one of them was able to step ashore. Jamestown, the only place to make a landing, has no harbor – not even an itsy-bitsy one like Tristan with an itsy-bitsy breakwater. The Jamestown Wharf has no dock, no breakwater, nothing’s enclosed, the swell just slams into these concrete steps straight on. Last week, the swell was so large that it wasn’t safe for the ship’s tenders to offload passengers – so the ship finally sailed away, with 900 very angry and frustrated people aboard. Tristan can’t expand its micro-harbor as the water’s so deep. But Jamestown’s anchorage is shallow, making it far easier to construct a safe harbor – yet the Saints never bothered. Last week, they just shrugged their shoulders at the loss of business from 900 customers. I’m on a small expedition ship. There’s only 54 of us, and we use Zodiac inflatables to make landings. The swell is down a bit this week, so we all got ashore. We found most stores closed. It’s a Saint tradition that everything shuts down on Wednesday afternoons – and it just doesn’t matter if there are visitors in town willing to spend money. So I went off to climb Jacob’s Ladder. Jamestown is in a narrow valley open to the sea, two blocks wide and a mile long. In 1829, the Brits built what is still the world’s longest continuous stairway, 699 10-inch steps, at a gradient of 39° to 44°, to a fort at the top of the hill above the town. Going up Jacob’s Ladder wasn’t so bad – it was coming down fast that blew out my quadriceps. So I retired to the locals’ main watering hole, the bar at the Consulate Hotel, for a cold beer. There, old-timer Saints like Trevor and Geoff were happy to tell me how St. Helena was Paradise Lost. “I’d say the Saints’ problem has always been lack of enterprise,” Trevor let me know. “You say you’ve been to Tristan, right? They really know how to fish there, how to work hard, how to raise their sheep and grow potatoes. Here, folks don’t know and don’t want to know, they don’t care. They’d rather be poor and hungry than work hard. Been that way for centuries, why everything here always fails.” Geoff stepped in. “That may all be true – the government is always complaining about the Saints’ ‘lack of motivated labor,’ as they put it. But the government has always been the problem here, all the rules and very little private property, first of the Company and then the Crown ever since. All these ‘civil servants’ sent from London to run our lives – we call them ‘inky fingers.’ Their fingers used to be stained from handling the carbon copies of their forms in triplicate.” We all laughed hard and ordered another beer. I told them, “I have a news flash for you guys. In America, it’s just as bad now. Our lives are controlled by Obama’s inky-finger bureaucrats.” Geoff asked, “Are people in America leaving or staying? It won’t be as bad as here until lots of people leave and won’t stay. Then it keeps getting bad. For three centuries here, people with gumption left the island to work elsewheres like South Africa or England. Those with no gumption stayed. You say you’ve been to the Falklands – bet you met a lot of Saints working hard there, right?” I nodded. I thought of Carl, who managed the Malvina House Hotel in Stanley so well, and other smart, capable Saints I knew there. A fellow named Bob joined us. With a smile, he said, “Well, you might use these two as examples. Both are from old Saint families, born and raised on the island, then Geoff here joined the British Merchant Marine and sailed the world, while Trevor went to the UK and became a London cabbie. Do you know how smart you have to be with an encyclopedia in your head to be one of them?” I certainly did and said so. Trevor acknowledged the compliment. “Yes, for 37 years I was, and now we’re retired – Bob here was with the RAF (British Royal Air Force) – so we’ve come back home to live, where our pensions can easily carry us. Look around town, you’ll see many of us, and youngsters, but fewer of working age. They’ve left, and the remits (remittances) they send back to their families are what keep this economy afloat.” Bob added, “That and all the government paychecks everyone gets, for unemployment or a make-work government job.” I asked them, with almost no crime at all on the island, why did I see uniformed police walking in ones and twos all over town? “More make-work with government money,” came the answer. “Most of them are nice, but it’s still more government control, and more rules to enforce that are made up by the inky fingers.” Government control really is the universal social poison. Combine it with a flawed culture, and you get failure every time. The Saints were given a paradise, but they were never given freedom, not by the East India Company nor the British Crown. They never developed a work ethic, a determination to thrive, as did the people of Tristan. Those that did have it expressed it by leaving. The future of St. Helena may not be good, at least for the Saints. An international airport is being built on the island, by a South African company at British government expense. A “tourist boom” is expected, but just how and for whom is not clear. St. Helena is a beautiful place, but there are no beaches, there’s little wildlife, its history can be experienced in a morning’s tour of Longwood House and an afternoon walk in Jamestown. The airport should be completed by 2016 and the island is utterly unready. Not a single airline has committed to flying here. There’s no tourist infrastructure nor people trained in the tourist industry, and given the Saints’ work ethic, it’s unlikely there will be. Which means there’s going to be a huge influx of foreign labor to build the hotels and staff them and various tourist services. If the tourists come, on airlines willing to bring them. The whole thing may be the biggest St. Helena Failure of all. It may succeed, but those succeeding will be the foreign workers, managers, and business owners. Most Saints will remain on government paychecks, while Trevor, Geoff, and Bob will be at the Consulate Bar gently laughing about it all over a cold beer. The first Americans – settlers from England in the 1600s like the Saints – were given a paradise. And they were given their freedom. They put them together to develop a determination to thrive like no other people on earth. Yet freedom-destroying government control and subsidies can sap that determination out of any culture, and can cause the loss of any paradise. Ronald Reagan called America “the last, best hope of mankind.” The loss of a paradise on a volcanic speck in the South Atlantic Ocean means nothing, save to the tiny number of people who live there. The loss of the American Paradise of Freedom and Prosperity would be an incalculable loss for all of humanity. We haven’t lost it yet, but we’re losing more of it day by day, inch by inch. We’re losing what the Saints never had, a culture of freedom, self-sufficiency, personal responsibility, the determination to thrive, a culture not controlled by inky fingers. The Saints never had this, so it’s hard for them to acquire it. But we did have it, and we still have enough of a residue to get it back. We’re not Saints, we’re Americans. It’s time to shake off control of Zero’s inky fingers. [Editor’s Note: Once called “Indiana Jones of the Right” by The Washington Post, Dr. Jack Wheeler is the founder of To The Point, a website that serves as “The Oasis for Rational Conservatives”. Learn more at www.tothepointnews.com.]last_img read more

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Renault and Fiat Chrysler stuck over merger terms report

first_img Citation: Renault and Fiat Chrysler stuck over merger terms: report (2019, May 30) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-renault-fiat-chrysler-stuck-merger.html Renault’s share price has been punished since the November 2018 arrest of its former chief executive Carlos Ghosn (pictured May 23, 2019) An AFP source close to FCA said “the offer is balanced in terms of valuation, governance and industrial strength.”A deal would hold advantages for both carmakers as FCA is widely seen as a latecomer to the electric vehicle market, where Renault is strong. But the French firm doesn’t have a presence in North America, where Chrysler is strong in the SUV and pick-up sectors.Taking into account Renault’s alliance with Nissan and Mitsubishi, the enlarged group would be the world’s largest carmaking group by a wide margin. Talks between Fiat Chrysler and Renault have hit a roadblock over the financial terms of the proposed merger between the Italian-US and French carmakers, the French business daily Les Echos reported online Thursday, citing sources close to Fiat Chrysler. Renault said earlier this week it is studying “with interest” a 50-50 merger proposal from Fiat Chrysler (FCA), a deal that would forge the world’s third-largest automaker.The newspaper reported on its website that a source close to FCA said several Renault board members believe the terms of the offer need to be sweetened.But that is not how FCA sees things, said the source.”The offer seems fair, it was approved by the board. It is take it or leave it, and fast!” said the source.Meanwhile, the daily said Renault is unhappy as the offer is based on its share price on May 24, the day before the offer was announced, or 51.70 euros.Renault’s share price has been punished since the arrest last November of its former chief executive Carlos Ghosn. Before then it rarely fell below 70 euros per share.An AFP source close to the negotiations said such merger offers are rarely take it or leave it.”These type of offers are certainly negotiable,” said that source.A source close to Renault told AFP that without the carmaker’s board having adopted a position it was difficult to comment on rumours. Renault said it is studying “with interest” a 50-50 merger proposal from Fiat Chrysler, which would forge the world’s third-largest automakercenter_img Renault tries to reassure partner Nissan on Fiat plans © 2019 AFP Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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France to ban destroying unsold goods targeting Amazon luxury brands

first_imgFrance Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said that a ban on the destruction of unsold goods, which will affect online retailers like Amazon, would go into effect within four years France’s prime minister on Tuesday announced a crackdown on the destruction of unsold or returned consumer products, a move that will affect online retailers such as Amazon and luxury goods brands. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: France to ban destroying unsold goods, targeting Amazon, luxury brands (2019, June 4) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-france-unsold-goods-amazon-luxury.html Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said that a ban on destroying non-food goods—such as clothes, electrical items, hygiene products and cosmetics—would come into force within the next four years.The announcement came after Green parties surged across Europe in last month’s European elections, not least in France where the EELV party came third with 13.5 percent of the vote.According to the French premier’s office, over 650 million euros ($730 million) worth of new consumer products are thrown away or destroyed in France every year, five times more than donations of the same products.The measure would make it compulsory to hand in such products for re-use or recycling.”It is a waste that shocks, that is shocking to common sense. It’s a scandal,” said Philippe, as he launched the measure at a discount store in Paris.The measure is part of a draft bill on the economy which is due to be discussed by the cabinet in July. It would apply by between 2021-2023.France’s junior environment minister Brune Poirson promised a law to tackle waste in January after a television documentary showed Amazon destroying millions of products that had been returned by consumers.Based on hidden camera footage, the documentary on the M6 channel showed containers of unsold or returned products at an Amazon warehouse being sent for destruction under agreements signed between the online giant and third-party retailers.British fashion firm Burberry also caused a furore last year by acknowledging that it had burned unsold clothes, accessories and perfume worth £28.6 million ($35.5 million) annually to prevent them being sold off cheaply.The aim was to maintain the exclusivity and luxury mystique of the brand and it later became clear that the practice was relatively commonplace in the industry.The French PM’s office said special arrangements are anticipated for the luxury sector which would be encouraged to recycle the goods.This would avoid the risk of the copyright problems the luxury brands fear were the goods to be simply given away to third parties, an official at the French premier’s office said.Products which are not usable after a certain date would have exceptions.President Emmanuel Macron has sought to portray himself as a friend of the Green movement, especially in the fight against climate change.But his image was tarnished when prominent campaigner Nicolas Hulot, who Macron had named as environment minister, spectacularly quit the government last August, saying that his cabinet colleagues were doing too little to tackle climate change.center_img Self-destructive behaviour: Burberry not alone Explore further © 2019 AFPlast_img read more

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