Tag: 杭州桑拿

Raiders CB Gareon Conley taken off field, Gruden says he should be OK

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile device Raiders cornerback Gareon Conley was carted off the field during the third quarter of Monday night’s game against the Broncos after accidentally getting hit by a teammate.Raiders coach Jon Gruden said after a 24-16 win over the Denver Broncos he believed Doss wasn’t seriously injured.“I got good word on him that he’s going to be OK. I don’t know his status for the next game, but most importantly the kid is …last_img

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Muslims in India are the happiest, says RSS chief Mohan Bhagwat

first_imgThe happiest Muslims in the world are found in India, thanks to the Hindu culture, Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh chief Mohan Bhagwat said here on Saturday.“Hindu” is not a religion or a language, he said, addressing a gathering of intellectuals. Neither is it the name of a country. “Hindu” is the culture of all those who live in India… one that accepts and respects diverse cultures. When any nation has deviated from the right path, it has come to us in search of truth, he said.“When Jews were wandering, India was the only nation where they got shelter. The Parsis practise their religion freely only in India. The happiest Muslims are found in India. Why is it so? Because we are Hindus,” he said.“It is our Hindu Rashtra. Many in India are ashamed of proclaiming their Hindu identity. There are some who will say they are proud of being Hindu. There are others who will say they are Hindu, but show their annoyance at the continuous utterance of the word. There are some who are cautious about their Hindu identity. When you ask them behind closed doors, then they will admit that they are Hindus. Because their interest are affected,” said the RSS chief.last_img read more

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Here come the Lions

first_imgThe Lions stormed out of the gates hard as Bolick fired nine of his 21 points and Tankoua scored seven of his 13 points in the opening period, where San Beda raced to a15-point advantage.Although the Stags came within four points in the fourth period thanks to Michael Calisaan and Jayson David, the Lions kept their poise with Mocon’s baskets finishing off San Sebastian, which only shot six free throws, 30 less than the total of San Beda.“I just wanted to win and play against Lyceum again,” said Mocon.Bolick also had a lot of motivation playing against San Sebastian, which has earned a reputation as a tough and physical team.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Azkals off to Kathmandu CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games The magnitude of the occasion was more than enough to draw out a career game from San Beda star Javee Mocon.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohortcenter_img Read Next Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 With his team’s run of finals appearances on the line, Mocon pumped in 23 points and grabbed 22 rebounds as the Red Lions turned back the San Sebastian Stags, 76-71, Tuesday night at Mall of Asia Arena to forge a championship duel with Lyceum in NCAA Season 93 basketball tournament.The Lions came out strong even after a 19-day break as Robert Bolick and Donald Tankoua also dished out solid games to keep San Beda’s bid alive for a 10th title in 12 seasons.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut it was Mocon’s workmanlike performance in the physical and bruising duel with the Stags that stood out in a game where the Lions led by as many as 18 points before holding off San Sebastian’s late surge.“It’s a do-or-die game,” said Mocon, who had 14 points in the second half. “That was enough motivation for me.” LATEST STORIES For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. “I am inspired when I play against San Sebastian,” said Bolick. “They give everything. They don’t give up and that’s the beauty of San Sebastian. That’s how they play, and I love how they play. Who doesn’t get motivated when you play against a team like that? We have to appreciate that kind of team.”For San Beda coach Boyet Fernandez, it was all about trusting his team again after the setback to Lyceum.“I gave them my trust, and they gave me this day,” said Fernandez. “Again, 19 days off, it’s really tough. But I give credit to Baste (San Sebastian), I will give full credit to my players. They sacrificed a lot in preparation for this game. We lost against Lyceum and I know people have been doubting us. But the players believe in themselves.”A date with the unbeaten Pirates awaits the Lions in Game 1 of the best-of-three finals this Friday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.San Beda lost both games against Lyceum in the elimination round including a 105-102 overtime loss on Oct. 19.“We came out with a win today, and yes we’re happy, but we still have a job to do on Friday, which is against Lyceum,” said Fernandez.“I know we were beaten by Lyceum fair and square, we lost those two games but I still trust my players and I know they’ll come up big for Friday’s game.”Despite its championship tradition, the multititled Fernandez admitted his team will be going into the finals as the underdog.“Lyceum is the best teamright now because they beat us twice. So we’re underdogs, but again, we’ll find a way to win. Allow us to enjoy tonight, and let’s see each other on Friday.”Earlier, pint-sized guard Joel Cagulangan shot 29 points in 52 minutes on the floor as La Salle Green Hills outlasted San Beda, 110-108, in triple overtime to set up a championship tiff with Mapua in the juniors division. Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa View commentslast_img read more

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This Might Be A Perfect Description Of What Jim Harbaugh Looks Like

first_imgHead coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines gathers his team before the start of the game.ARLINGTON, TX – SEPTEMBER 02: Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines watches his team warm up before the game against the Florida Gators at AT&T Stadium on September 2, 2017 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)The best bit in sports radio is The Dan Le Batard Show With Stugotz‘s “What He Looks Like Game.” Le Batard, Stugotz and Co., with the help of their listeners, try to come up with perfect descriptions of what people in sports look like. Some examples:Paxton Lynch looks like the old school Tampa Bay Buccaneers logo.Vin Scully looks like the one real human in a Disney movie filled with animated talking animals.Dan Gilbert looks like the guy who shaves in the locker room mirror at the gym while totally nude.They’ve come up with one for Jim Harbaugh and, Ohio State fans, it’s pretty perfect, right?Jim Harbaugh looks like the guy who yells at his wife in front of everyone when they lose at Pictionary on gamenight pic.twitter.com/Whz6ERQVAI— What He Looks Like (@WhatHeLooksLike) May 8, 2016He totally does.last_img read more

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Timeline for Boeing and Bombardier dispute over the CSeries

first_imgMONTREAL – The timeline of the commercial dispute between Boeing and Bombardier:– April 27: The Chicago giant asks the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) to take action against Bombardier’s business practices.– May 18: The Department of Commerce confirms the beginning of an investigation. Ottawa replies by questioning a military order from Boeing for new Super Hornet jet fighters.– June 9: ITC gives the go-ahead for Washington to continue its investigation into CSeries sales south of the border.– 28 June: At the request of Boeing, the Department of Commerce agrees to delay the disclosure of its preliminary decision on possible punitive duties by two months, until Sept. 25.– Sept. 4: Boeing International Division President Marc Allen says the U.S. giant has no intention to back down and withdraw its complaint against Bombardier.– Sept. 5: British Prime Minister Theresa May, in a telephone conversation with U.S. President Donald Trump, pleads in favour of the Quebec manufacturer, which has more than 4,000 employees in Belfast, Northern Ireland.– Sept. 13: Demonstration in downtown Montreal of hundreds of union members in the aeronautics sector to denounce the Boeing approach.– Sept. 20: Bombardier workers in Toronto walk off the job to support company’s battle against Boeing.– Sept. 24: JetBlue becomes latest U.S. airline to write to the ITC urging it to deny Boeing’s petition, saying tariffs on the aircraft would harm competition and result in higher airfares.– Sept. 26: Department of Commerce announces a hefty 219 per cent preliminary countervailing duty on CSeries exports to the U.S., pending a final determination in February.– Oct. 4: Department of Commerce is expected to announce preliminary anti-dumping duties, but that could be extended.– December: Department of Commerce will release its final determinations.– February: ITC will make its final ruling, imposes any final duties.last_img read more

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MLAs daughter delivers Mothers Day gifts to local seniors

first_img“I was riding by the hospital recently and saw a bunch of seniors out front of the care centre, they were so nice and friendly, I just felt I wanted to do something nice for them,” said Davies. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The ladies residing at Peace Villa and Abbeyfield House each received a carnation, chocolate and a card on Mother’s Day after the daughter of Peace River North MLA Dan Davies came up with the idea of doing something nice for local seniors.Bert Bowes Grade 7 student Hana Davies said she thought of the idea of giving the gifts last week. Dan Davies said his daughter got permission from the two care centres, did a budget, and got Inland Concrete to sponsor the gifts. Davies hand-delivered the surprise gifts to the residents of the two facilities at lunch time on Mother’s Day.Hana Davies handing a flower and card to Peace Villa resident Debbie Simons. Supplied photo.last_img read more

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Thailand junta poised to retain power

first_imgBangkok: Thailand’s election results were due Monday, with the junta appearing poised to hold on to power in a vote that saw its main rival diminished but vaulted a new pro-democracy force into the kingdom’s politics. Sunday’s poll — seen as a referendum on the military — was the first since a 2014 coup, and was held under new rules written by the junta to ease its transformation into a civilian government. Despite that, analysts had not expected the army-linked Phalang Pracharat party to win the popular vote, given mounting anger at junta rule and the enduring popularity of Pheu Thai — the party of ex-premier Thaksin Shinawatra. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USBut Thai politics is unpredictable, and as preliminary results trickled in Sunday, Phalang Pracharat — with coup leader Prayut Chan-O-Cha as its candidate for prime minister — clung to the lead, racking up more than 7.6 million votes with 93 percent of ballots tallied. “This will give them… popular legitimacy and more credibility,” Thitinan Pongsudhirak, a political scientist at Bangkok’s Chulalongkorn University, said. Phalang Pracharat had nearly half a million more votes than Pheu Thai, despite the track record of Thaksin whose parties have won every vote since 2001, drawing on loyalty from the rural and urban poor. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsPrayut’s party is on track to cobble together the 126 votes in the lower house it needs for a parliamentary majority, in combination with a 250-seat upper house Senate that is appointed by the junta. The Bangkok Post, Thailand’s main English-language newspaper, splashed “Prayut return ‘likely'” across its front page on Monday. The poll pitted a royalist junta and its allies against the election-winning machine of billionaire-turned-politician Thaksin and featured an unpredictable wave of millions of first-time voters. As the results came in, dismay rippled out across the pro-democracy camp, with prospects diminishing of an anti-junta coalition squeezing into power. The Election Commission unexpectedly postponed the release of fuller results until Monday afternoon, including the number of lower house seats won by each party. The Election Commission has said it will finalise the results by May 9. But questions quickly began to percolate on social media over an election that saw a massive 1.9 million ballots invalidated, setting the stage for disputes. Turnout was a tepid 64 percent, much lower than forecasts. Election night was full of surprises, with the new, youth-focused Future Forward party led by telegenic billionaire Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit taking more than five million votes, which could make it Thailand’s third-biggest party. And on the eve of the poll, Thailand’s King Maha Vajiralongkorn issued a cryptic statement urging people to support “good” leaders against those who create “chaos.” Another royal command in February torpedoed the candidacy of the king’s elder sister Princess Ubolratana for prime minister via a party linked to Thaksin. Thaksin was ousted in a 2006 coup, and has lived in self-exile since 2008. The administration of his sister Yingluck was also the victim of a 2014 power grab by the military. The Shinawatra-aligned Pheu Thai party has vowed to accept the results but said it needed more “clarity” on the outcome before it took a stance.last_img read more

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Flavours of South America on show

first_imgRoadshow inspires destination awareness. The Flavours of South America Roadshow Sydney showcased exciting destinations, providing an insight into the unique tours and opportunities available throughout the continent.Adventure World hosted the event, bringing together destination specialists from Peru, Brazil, Patagonia, Argentina, Bolivia, Condor Travel, LATAM Airlines, Exodus and Metropolitan Touring and Cruceros.Adventure World reminded delegates of their ongoing partnership with National Geographic and the magazines involvement with features for the Adventure World 2012/2013 series brochures.LATAM Airlines advised attendees of the opportunities associated with their South American Airpass, which has been available for purchase since June 2013.“The South American Airpass provides travellers the choice to fly to preferred destinations on multiple routes, with the ability to create tailor-made itineraries,” LATAM Airlines business development manager Aaron Lovelock said.Destination specialists gave brief presentations and were available throughout the evening to answer any questions and provide information in the form of brochures and fact sheets.The colourful event was held at The Cuban Place in Sydney, with traditional South American cuisine and entertainment, including latin dance, on display.The Flavours of South America Roadshow has already visited New Zealand and is currently touring Australia. Source = e-Travel Blackboard: P.T.last_img read more

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Technicolor and Philips have merged their High Dyn

first_imgTechnicolor and Philips have merged their High Dynamic Range (HDR) development efforts in a bid to accelerate deployment of the technology.The agreement will see the companies merge their delivery roadmaps for HDR solutions – including content creation tools, encoding and decoding software and implementation support.Technicolor and Philips said they will offer HDR delivery with “full backwards compatibility” to Standard Dynamic Range displays – meaning distributors who will be able to send one signal to all of their customers, regardless of which TV they have.“This move is a reflection of how fast the market for HDR is developing, and how important it is to partner and scale up to effectively serve industry demand for high-quality video delivery,” said Jako Eleveld, head of IP licensing for Philips.Manuele Wahl, senior vice president of technology and trademark licensing at Technicolor added: “Combining the HDR research from two of the most prominent and trusted names in imaging is a significant step in the maturity of HDR technologies.”“Philips is bringing years of experience in consumer electronics and silicon partnerships. This combined with Technicolor’s heritage in content creation and technology licensing will provide a compelling backwards compatible solution which will accelerate HDR adoption.”Technicolor and Philips said they will continue to support their respective HDR products and solutions, which are already deployed in the market, and will merge “the best part of these” into the combined solution.Early results of the firms’ combined HDR offering are due to be shown at NAB 2016 in April, followed by commercial deployments on silicon in late 2016. Both companies will continue to work independently on other solutions for enhancing video and audio technologies.last_img read more

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Todays article comes to us from world traveler a

first_img[Today’s article comes to us from world traveler and quintessential “international man” Dr. Jack Wheeler.] Jamestown, St. Helena, South Atlantic Ocean. If you have ever heard of this little 47 square mile island lost in a vast sea, 1,200 miles west of Africa and 1,800 miles east of Brazil, it’s because here is where the British exiled Napoleon after Waterloo, and here is where he died. The 5.5 years of Napoleon’s exile – October 15, 1815 to his death on May 5, 1821 – dominate the island’s 500-year history. For the last 354 years, since 1659, it has been a British possession. Yet such is the grip of Napoleon that the Brits ceded the home and property of where he lived in exile on St. Helena – called Longwood House – to the government of France. It is French territory, as is his original burial place nearby. Moreover, there is a Consul appointed by the French government, who lives in a diplomat’s mansion on the island. Personally, I have no regard for a megalomaniac responsible for the deaths of millions of people. The Brits should have treated him as a war criminal, executed him by firing squad aboard a ship far out to sea, and dumped his body in the ocean. But no. Instead the Brits treated this mass murderer, because he called himself “Emperor” and dressed himself in ermine robes, with the same honor and respect as if he were royalty. This has tainted St. Helena and its people ever since. You have to wonder though, after learning the island’s history, whether it has been tainted from the beginning. This place is a paradise – or rather, it’s a place that always could have been but never was. The people of St. Helena like to call themselves “Saints.” In a number of odd and interesting ways, they are the saints who lost paradise. And it turns out those ways are very relevant and instructive for us today. The folks who originally made it a paradise were the Portuguese. A captain named João da Nova returning from India was blown off course in 1502, and discovered an uninhabited island which he named St. Helena (the mother of Roman Emperor Constantine who converted him to Christianity) as it was her Saint’s Day (May 21). He had meant to keep a course up Africa’s west coast, but realized the prevailing winds (the southeast trades) made it quicker and easier to sail via this island that was lush and verdant, with a perfect climate for growing anything, and that no one knew about. The Portuguese converted it into a replenishment station to resupply ships on the way back home from India, planting fruit trees (fig, lemon, orange, pomegranate), plus vegetables and herbs, and left pigs and goats to breed – all for food for ships’ crews. They never colonized it nor built a settlement, and kept it a secret for 86 years. Then a British captain, Thomas Cavendish, found it in 1588, and soon British pirates used it to waylay Portuguese ships heavily laden with riches from the East. When the Dutch learned of St. Helena, they began fighting the Brits over it, and the Portuguese left in disgust that their peaceful paradise was spoiled. Even though the Brits and Dutch fought over it, strangely enough neither settled there, until 1659 when the British East India Company landed the first people to ever live on St. Helena. The fruit trees were flourishing, plenty of pigs and goats to eat (not to mention swarms of fish in the sea), plenty of water, forests, fertile land – and somehow these folks, even with African slaves, managed to go hungry. In 1672, the first of many mutinies and rebellions occurred, when the settlers seized the East India Company’s Governor of the island and shipped him back to England. Settlers and soldiers stationed by the Company mutinied and forcibly removed subsequent Governors in 1674, 1684, and 1693. The Company insisted a large contingent of soldiers was necessary to guard the island, among whom drunkenness was a constant problem. Whenever there wasn’t enough booze (rum shipped from the Caribbean or an island-made tequila distilled from fermented prickly pear juice), they would threaten to mutiny. The biggest was the Christmas Mutiny of 1783, after which ten soldiers were hung. All through this, the settlers and their slaves couldn’t manage to adequately feed and work for themselves. So in 1810, the Company imported hundreds of Chinese laborers. When Napoleon arrived in 1815, they built Longwood House and cultivated its gardens. The British spent a fortune guarding Napoleon to prevent his escaping as he had previously at Elba (an island just off the west coast of Italy, easy to escape from). 2,000 more soldiers were stationed on the island, and Royal Navy ships constantly patrolled the coastline. Napoleon and his entourage dined with fine cuisine and wines every night. He had his personal library of 1,847 books, he dictated his memoirs, his entourage doted on him, he had a life of peace and leisure. Yet he deteriorated rapidly. There are many contemporary drawings of him at Longwood, showing him getting fatter, older, and more depressed with each year. By 1820, he looked like an aged old man. When he died of stomach cancer the next year, he was 51 years old. The Brits withdrew their guarding soldiers and patrolling ships, and the islanders slid back into their usual poverty. In 1832, the East India Company turned control of the island to the Crown. St. Helena became a British Crown Colony and slavery was abolished, with 2,200 African slaves (one third of the population) liberated. The Colony was instructed to become self-sufficient – which, after an almost unbroken string of failed attempts, it has proved unable to do so to this day. From the 1840s through the 1870s, every attempt to establish the island as a whaling center failed. In 1869, the Suez Canal opened, so ships had no need to go around Africa (and stop at the island) to get to and from the Orient. More isolated than ever, the islanders turned to flax. Seedlings were imported from New Zealand, and grew like weeds. Flax mills were built to convert flax into fiber for rope and twine. Flax, however, is a plantation plant harvested with mechanization. On the mountainous slopes of the island, it could only be harvested by hand. Excepting a few rare interludes over the next 90 years, the flax industry could only be supported by government subsidy, and collapsed immediately after the subsidy was finally withdrawn in 1966. An attempt at establishing a lace-making industry failed in 1907, followed by the failure of a fish-canning factory in 1909. The islanders, it seems, just weren’t very good at catching fish. They never have been, accounting for the failure of another fish cannery in 1957. Another thing Saints have never been any good at is growing food. Valleys once full of groves of fruit trees left by the Portuguese became dead and stony due to neglect. Land cleared for pasture was allowed to erode away. The islanders were as bad at farming and husbandry as they were at fishing. They’ve been like that since the 1660s and are now. Most fruit, such as lemons and oranges, are imported today. It’s the same with most meat and vegetables, imported from South Africa. Tristan’s 262 people can feed themselves in a far harsher environment, but St. Helena, with some 3,000 people and thousands of acres of far more fertile land, cannot. What could account for centuries of incompetence and failure on this lush, beautiful island? What happened last week, before we got here, might help explain. A large cruise ship arrived, enroute to Cape Town, carrying 900 passengers. Not one of them was able to step ashore. Jamestown, the only place to make a landing, has no harbor – not even an itsy-bitsy one like Tristan with an itsy-bitsy breakwater. The Jamestown Wharf has no dock, no breakwater, nothing’s enclosed, the swell just slams into these concrete steps straight on. Last week, the swell was so large that it wasn’t safe for the ship’s tenders to offload passengers – so the ship finally sailed away, with 900 very angry and frustrated people aboard. Tristan can’t expand its micro-harbor as the water’s so deep. But Jamestown’s anchorage is shallow, making it far easier to construct a safe harbor – yet the Saints never bothered. Last week, they just shrugged their shoulders at the loss of business from 900 customers. I’m on a small expedition ship. There’s only 54 of us, and we use Zodiac inflatables to make landings. The swell is down a bit this week, so we all got ashore. We found most stores closed. It’s a Saint tradition that everything shuts down on Wednesday afternoons – and it just doesn’t matter if there are visitors in town willing to spend money. So I went off to climb Jacob’s Ladder. Jamestown is in a narrow valley open to the sea, two blocks wide and a mile long. In 1829, the Brits built what is still the world’s longest continuous stairway, 699 10-inch steps, at a gradient of 39° to 44°, to a fort at the top of the hill above the town. Going up Jacob’s Ladder wasn’t so bad – it was coming down fast that blew out my quadriceps. So I retired to the locals’ main watering hole, the bar at the Consulate Hotel, for a cold beer. There, old-timer Saints like Trevor and Geoff were happy to tell me how St. Helena was Paradise Lost. “I’d say the Saints’ problem has always been lack of enterprise,” Trevor let me know. “You say you’ve been to Tristan, right? They really know how to fish there, how to work hard, how to raise their sheep and grow potatoes. Here, folks don’t know and don’t want to know, they don’t care. They’d rather be poor and hungry than work hard. Been that way for centuries, why everything here always fails.” Geoff stepped in. “That may all be true – the government is always complaining about the Saints’ ‘lack of motivated labor,’ as they put it. But the government has always been the problem here, all the rules and very little private property, first of the Company and then the Crown ever since. All these ‘civil servants’ sent from London to run our lives – we call them ‘inky fingers.’ Their fingers used to be stained from handling the carbon copies of their forms in triplicate.” We all laughed hard and ordered another beer. I told them, “I have a news flash for you guys. In America, it’s just as bad now. Our lives are controlled by Obama’s inky-finger bureaucrats.” Geoff asked, “Are people in America leaving or staying? It won’t be as bad as here until lots of people leave and won’t stay. Then it keeps getting bad. For three centuries here, people with gumption left the island to work elsewheres like South Africa or England. Those with no gumption stayed. You say you’ve been to the Falklands – bet you met a lot of Saints working hard there, right?” I nodded. I thought of Carl, who managed the Malvina House Hotel in Stanley so well, and other smart, capable Saints I knew there. A fellow named Bob joined us. With a smile, he said, “Well, you might use these two as examples. Both are from old Saint families, born and raised on the island, then Geoff here joined the British Merchant Marine and sailed the world, while Trevor went to the UK and became a London cabbie. Do you know how smart you have to be with an encyclopedia in your head to be one of them?” I certainly did and said so. Trevor acknowledged the compliment. “Yes, for 37 years I was, and now we’re retired – Bob here was with the RAF (British Royal Air Force) – so we’ve come back home to live, where our pensions can easily carry us. Look around town, you’ll see many of us, and youngsters, but fewer of working age. They’ve left, and the remits (remittances) they send back to their families are what keep this economy afloat.” Bob added, “That and all the government paychecks everyone gets, for unemployment or a make-work government job.” I asked them, with almost no crime at all on the island, why did I see uniformed police walking in ones and twos all over town? “More make-work with government money,” came the answer. “Most of them are nice, but it’s still more government control, and more rules to enforce that are made up by the inky fingers.” Government control really is the universal social poison. Combine it with a flawed culture, and you get failure every time. The Saints were given a paradise, but they were never given freedom, not by the East India Company nor the British Crown. They never developed a work ethic, a determination to thrive, as did the people of Tristan. Those that did have it expressed it by leaving. The future of St. Helena may not be good, at least for the Saints. An international airport is being built on the island, by a South African company at British government expense. A “tourist boom” is expected, but just how and for whom is not clear. St. Helena is a beautiful place, but there are no beaches, there’s little wildlife, its history can be experienced in a morning’s tour of Longwood House and an afternoon walk in Jamestown. The airport should be completed by 2016 and the island is utterly unready. Not a single airline has committed to flying here. There’s no tourist infrastructure nor people trained in the tourist industry, and given the Saints’ work ethic, it’s unlikely there will be. Which means there’s going to be a huge influx of foreign labor to build the hotels and staff them and various tourist services. If the tourists come, on airlines willing to bring them. The whole thing may be the biggest St. Helena Failure of all. It may succeed, but those succeeding will be the foreign workers, managers, and business owners. Most Saints will remain on government paychecks, while Trevor, Geoff, and Bob will be at the Consulate Bar gently laughing about it all over a cold beer. The first Americans – settlers from England in the 1600s like the Saints – were given a paradise. And they were given their freedom. They put them together to develop a determination to thrive like no other people on earth. Yet freedom-destroying government control and subsidies can sap that determination out of any culture, and can cause the loss of any paradise. Ronald Reagan called America “the last, best hope of mankind.” The loss of a paradise on a volcanic speck in the South Atlantic Ocean means nothing, save to the tiny number of people who live there. The loss of the American Paradise of Freedom and Prosperity would be an incalculable loss for all of humanity. We haven’t lost it yet, but we’re losing more of it day by day, inch by inch. We’re losing what the Saints never had, a culture of freedom, self-sufficiency, personal responsibility, the determination to thrive, a culture not controlled by inky fingers. The Saints never had this, so it’s hard for them to acquire it. But we did have it, and we still have enough of a residue to get it back. We’re not Saints, we’re Americans. It’s time to shake off control of Zero’s inky fingers. [Editor’s Note: Once called “Indiana Jones of the Right” by The Washington Post, Dr. Jack Wheeler is the founder of To The Point, a website that serves as “The Oasis for Rational Conservatives”. Learn more at www.tothepointnews.com.]last_img read more

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