Tag: 爱上海

Garda Inspector says he hopes missing man is found safe and well

first_imgA Garda Inspector has said he hopes a missing Letterkenny man is found safe and well.Inspector Seamus McGonigle made his comments at Falcarragh District Court during the case of Matthew Lafferty.The 27-year-old has been missing since last Sunday when he was last seen on CCTV outside a hotel in Sligo. He has since made contact with his family but they are still unsure of his whereabouts.Mr Lafferty was due to be in court facing alleged in insurance charges.His solicitor Patsy Gallagher said “Matthew has been in the local media in recent days because we are not sure of his whereabouts and his family are very worried.”Judge Paul Kelly said that in the circumstances he would not issue a bench warrant. Garda Inspector says he hopes missing man is found safe and well was last modified: September 19th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:courtdonegalMatthew Laffertymissinglast_img read more

Read more…

PBS Airs Another Evolution Series: Origins

first_imgNotably absent from the promotional ads was any mention of the “E” word, evolution.  Nevertheless, the concept saturated the series like sauce to pasta.Maybe PBS learned its lesson from October 2001 that the E word is a lightning rod.  Concepts are not mitigated by avoidance of loaded words and euphemisms.  Maybe Origins is gentler word, but this was nothing less than “PBS Evolution 2004” (See 09/28/2001 headline), and evolution was the last word Tyson uttered, with feeling.    The series so far exhibits the perpetual sins of the Darwin Party: (1) just-so storytelling, (2) glittering generalities, (3) selective evidence, (4) bluffing (e.g., “How life began” when they haven’t a clue), and (5) empty promises (futureware).  The hype keeps Charlie’s disciples hoping for success in the snipe hunt for a naturalistic explanation for a universe that appears designed for a purpose.    One aspect about Origins was predictable: the series only vaguely, when at all, hinted that the majority of the earth’s population believes, and always has believed, that the universe was designed for a purpose by an intelligent Creator.  Instead, it presented as fact the naturalistic philosophy believed by only 10-15% of the population that everything came from nothing.  Moreover, glossed over many serious flaws in the naturalistic scenario, and failed to give a fair hearing to competent scientists who could present valid alternatives.  We commented on this series in some depth, but it is really no different from the standard Darwinian propaganda pouring forth from PBS, the Science Channel and the Discovery Channel and National Geographic, week after week, year after year.  The rules are: assume evolution, ignore alternatives, prohibit rebuttals, ridicule believers in God, tell stories, worship scientism, and fill in the evidential gaps (canyons) with artwork.  Sagan taught them well.    The final lines in the final episode are the key to interpreting this series and the other Darwinian commercials.  It’s not about scientific evidence, because the closing lines are a classic case of stretching an inch of data into a light-year of interpretation.  No, it’s about religion: evolutionists are out to replace belief in intelligent design with naturalism, particularly the Biblical account of creation.  A lady astronomer makes it clear: we now have “a new version of Genesis, a new version of the great cosmic myth, only this time it is scientifically based.”  Other astronomers agree, stating that finally, within our enlightened grasp, a universe that was once seen as the domain of the gods is now explainable by an unbroken sequence of natural law acting on undirected particles, producing a great chain of being (welcome to the 18th century).  Tyson, staring into the camera, morphs into Carl Sagan claiming that this vast and wonderful universe, with all its life, is the result of “14 billion years of cosmic evolution.”  At least we’re getting younger; Sagan claimed it was 15 billion.    If this kind of religious advocacy in the guise of science bothers you, why not do something about it?  Write letters and call your local PBS station.  Tell them you want to see a fair and balanced presentation of the evidence.  Be constructive; ask them to air The Privileged Planet and Unlocking the Mystery of Life alongside the Darwin Party’s propaganda.  We don’t want to muzzle the opposition like the Darwinists do, we want people to hear both sides, like Charlie advised, and think about the evidence.  Ask PBS to stage a debate; suggest that Tyson’s team face a matching team of qualified spokespersons for the intelligent design position.  Let them ask the right questions and put all the evidence on the table fairly, without stacking the deck.  Tell them the magic words that make any station manager light up: it will help ratings.(Visited 40 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 PBS NOVA aired its latest installment on evolution, a 4-hour miniseries entitled Origins, on September 28 and 29.  The website hype describes it as follows:Has the universe always existed?  How did it become a place that could harbor life?  What was the birth of our planet like?  Are we alone, or are there alien worlds waiting to be discovered?  NOVA presents some startling new answers in “Origins,” a groundbreaking four-part NOVA miniseries hosted by dynamic astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History.  Tyson leads viewers on a cosmic journey to the beginning of time and into the distant reaches of the universe, searching for life’s first stirrings and its traces on other worlds.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)The series has four parts.  Our reaction is added in green after each synopsis.Earth Is Born.  This episode describes the assumed first billion years of our planet.  “Bombarded by meteors and comets, rocked by massive volcanic eruptions, and scoured by hot acid rain, the early Earth seems a highly improbable place for life to have taken root.  Despite such violent beginnings, scientists have found new clues that life-giving water and oxygen appeared on our planet much earlier than previously thought.”What this series lacks in evidence it makes up for in animation.  The visuals of the first two episodes consisted primarily of computer animations and interviews with Darwinian storytelling scientists, interspersed with irrelevant shots of them appearing to do some real lab work.  Episode One is just a higher-tech version of Disney’s old Fantasia myth (not the dancing hippos, but the early earth).  Notable in “Earth Is Born” was a repeating theme that new discoveries have recently overturned long-held ideas, especially uniformitarianism.  That’s a good lesson, if they would just apply it to the current tale-telling and plan ahead.How Life Began.  This episode describes organisms living currently in extreme environments, and claims “The survival of these tough microorganisms suggests they may be related to the planet’s first primitive life forms.”As expected, this episode was an illustrated liturgy of the usual astrobiological mystery religion, carefully shielded from critical scrutiny.  The novitiates are instructed in the tenets of the faith: comets brought our oceans and the building blocks of life, the first life “emerged” in extreme environments, bacteria invented photosynthesis, the “great liberator,” which gave us our oxygen atmosphere and made complex life possible, leading to “immense colonies of green slime which would take over the world.”  They even gave prominent press to the old Miller experiment, the “useful lie” that gave naturalistic abiogenesis a shot in the arm (see 05/02/2003 headline).  This is so retro.  The dramatic footage of sparks and bubbling chemicals was no match for the quick disclaimer that scientists debate the “recipe” for life and when it occurred.  Big Lie of the Episode: “When you get the recipe right, it goes, and it goes quickly.”  (How quickly?  Read our book).  Over and over, the Darwinists repeated their surprise at how quickly life “emerged” and evolved on the early earth despite all the meteor bombs, and the “hellish” conditions under which it arrived and thrived.    The pretentious air of this series borders on goofy, with its 1960-era sci-fi sound effects, hushed undertones and gimmicky cartoons.  Tyson’s phony dramatic delivery gets tedious real fast, especially with lines like “the building blocks of life arrived special delivery – from outer space!” and “photosynthesis: a clever invention; once it started, it was a runaway success.”  One can only hope this childishness will backfire on today’s precocious youngsters (especially home schoolers).  Maybe this series will be useful some day, to demonstrate what certain mad scientists believed in the early 21st century.  Young minds who don’t know better (especially some public schoolers) should be inoculated against raw propaganda and non-sequiturs like since life is found today in extreme environments, it must have evolved there.  Best give them a chance to learn basic logic first.    Any scientific evidence presented in this series was irrelevant to the story line; every bit of it has been contested by other evolutionary scientists, as reported right here in these pages for four years now (follow the “origin of life” chain links to get a higher education than you will get by watching Origins).  Evolutionary theory, from earth science to abiogenesis to human evolution, is a string of just-so mythoids glued together with irrelevant factoids.  Once in awhile you catch them admitting it: yes, the deuterium to hydrogen ratio in comets differs from that in the oceans, so maybe Earth’s water was not delivered by comets (sure makes a good animation, though).  Yes, the origin of life is an “astonishing mystery that we don’t understand,” and the “leap from non-living chemicals to a living cell is staggeringly complex” (but that Miller experiment looks so cool, so Frankenstein).    The myth, concocted in Fantasyland, thrives in Tomorrowland.  It’s not finding the answer, it’s wishing upon a star that matters.  Evolutionists, like Coronado on his quest for the seven gold cities, want to keep the dream alive, always out there around the next bend.  They rationalize their government-funded research as an adventurous quest to answer the great questions, to discover the secrets to our origins: which, being interpreted, means, they haven’t got a clue.  No matter; it’s not a product, it’s a process.  The goal, explaining everything without a Creator, must remain forever out of reach.  So Origins gives us process, becoming, futureware, unfulfilled promises, bluffing and dreams.  At every turn are the faith words: maybe, may have, perhaps, likely, controversial, debated, appears to, think, believe, seems like, could be, coulda, woulda, mighta…. Science?  No; mystery religion.  Its worship services are arrayed in glittering generalities, icons, reveries, and beatific visions of personified molecules lifting themselves up by their own bootstraps and wishing their way to manhood.    If you watch reputable design-centric presentations like the Illustra Media films, you will see a fair and balanced presentation of both sides.  Creationists have debated the world’s leading evolutionists toe to toe on college campuses, and even against the home field advantage have usually won because they know more about the opposing view than its advocates do themselves.  But to its gross dishonor, nowhere does Origins even hint at a suggestion that any serious scientist or philosopher ever doubted naturalism or seriously considered that the orderliness of creation pointed to a all-wise Creator.  Tyson whimsically dismisses the straw man of Van Helmont’s 17th-century “recipe for life” (spontaneous generation of mice from wheat), totally ignoring millennia of the world’s greatest thinkers and scientists who have defended the view, with detailed logic, scientific evidence and refutation of counter-arguments, that life was designed.  This omission is so glaring, it is utterly inexcusable in a supposed educational “science” program.  Van Helmont’s spontaneous generation is more akin to today’s origin-of-life theories than to any credible design position.  It was Darwin and his disciples, not the creationists, were disappointed when Pasteur disproved spontaneous generation.    Moreover, the first two episodes seemed to go out of their way to portray a world opposite the view of Bible-believing Christians and Jews, showing animation after animation of hellish lava and meteor impacts, stating emphatically, “early Earth was not a garden of Eden.”  Ignoring and dismissing any hint of a good or purposeful creation, it presented irrational beliefs dogmatically as fact: “life did arise from nonliving chemicals,” and “for over a hundred years, scientists have known that life is the result of chemistry.”  Nowhere was there any doubt about the alleged millions and billions of years, each date quoted as if they had a stopwatch running the whole time.  The whole series in fact, is built on the metaphor of a clock, on which all of earth history has been compressed into 24 hours.  Humankind, of course, appears late in the last few seconds of the day, uncaused, uncared for, a mere happenstance of a long and brutal cosmic arcade.  Science is supposed to be about observation.  Where’s the instant replay of this hypothesis so we can validate it?    This one episode was so shoddy, so baloney-ridden, so unbalanced, so quirky, it should anger knowledgeable viewers enough to write PBS, NOVA, and the sponsors to complain that such mythology-as-fact was presented as if the only “scientific” approach to origins.  Let’s have a debate.  Let’s have the counter-evidence get a fair hearing.  Let’s watch The Privileged Planet and Icons of Evolution.  Let’s get some leading Design PhDs in the ring with Tyson and see who’s left standing when fair, unbiased judges call foul at cheap shots and enforce the rules of evidence.    The credits show this program was funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation – your tax dollars at work.  It can only be hoped that this series, like Evolution before it, will flop as another wimpy hurrah of a dying religion on the verge of being tossed onto the dust-bin of discredited ideas.  Evolutionary theory, like a black-light poster, only glows in a dark room shielded from all but carefully selected, artificially-generated wavelengths.  It looks very different when the windows are opened and natural sunlight shines in.Where Are the Aliens?  This episode imagines what life on other worlds might be like.Typical SETI sales pitch, with the usual suspects (Drake equation by Drake himself), and the usual mythoids spouted as fact: life is as simple as just add water, lots of planets means lots of life, asteroid destroyed the dinosaurs but gave mammals a chance, etc. – Tyson says without the asteroid extinction, a dinosaur might be hosting the show, and the animation cartoonists help our poor imaginations.  More “it’s true because I say so” posturing: “we know we got to this [scene of crowd in shopping mall with cell phones by their ears] from this [bacteria] by evolution.”    You might learn tidbits about extrasolar planets and cephalopod camouflage here and there, and hearing Peter Ward of Rare Earth fame explain why he thinks advanced life is uncommon is a partial treat.  Other than that, the entire premise of this episode is a stack of evolutionary assumptions, held together with hope, stacked on the foundational assumption of naturalism, presented dogmatically and without rebuttal, with artwork substituting for evidence.  Can’t the Darwin Party change their tactics, now that we’ve blown their cover?  The sight of a naked emperor strutting around as if nobody notices his little secret is not pretty.    More personification fallacy: “if carbon makes life happen….” [stop right there].  “If those other planets have caught the spark of life also….” [stop, I said].  The illogic gets so tiring: “Scientists haven’t figured out how that spark of life happened, but since it happened early on, maybe it’s not so hard.”  No hint that the most essential ingredient in life is information.  Watch this episode alongside The Privileged Planet and Unlocking the Mystery of Life.  No contest.  The silliness of the Origins series has one benefit: it makes a perfect foil for these two films, making their relevance and superior logic shine even more brightly.Back to the Beginning.  This episode examines current thinking about the Big Bang theory.Yes, tell us all about the 97% of invisible stuff, the force that binds the universe together.  If it only has a dark side, how do evolutionists explain the origin of good?  Will Tyson be able to solve the Great Equation of Evolution, E = Nt x Nb?  (Nothing times nobody equals everything.)    No luck.  Tyson spends most of the hour describing the historical search for the cosmic background radiation and slight irregularities within it.  As expected, the interpretations of the final data set from WMAP are hyped beyond all recognition (see 09/20/2004 headline).  A chef gives Tyson an intelligently designed stew, at which Tyson remarks that it is entirely analogous to what the stars cook up.  As Sagan 2004, Tyson really knows how to put the b in big, bang, and billion.     The episode provides some interesting historical and personal stories of scientists at work, but does little to answer the big questions the episode promised to address.  Instead, we are forced to listen to worn-out, personified cliches like “the baby picture of the universe” and “the birth pangs of the cosmos” and “we are all stardust.”  The animation team did a lot of work on this Fantasia, but we’d rather hear it put to music.  John Cage would be apropos.  How about 4’33”, repeated endlessly?last_img read more

Read more…

Full Moon Has Magnetic Secret

first_imgPonder this under tonight’s full moon.  Scientists now say the moon once had a magnetic field stronger than Earth’s is now.It’s a big surprise.  How could the moon, much smaller than the Earth, have a strong magnetic field?  Yet it did, a new analysis of Apollo moon rocks reveals, according to Benjamin Weiss, a professor of physics at MIT.  In Science Magazine and other news outlets, he expressed his surprise that a body so small could generate this much power:Measurements of the intensity of the ancient lunar dynamo have shown that it was surprisingly intense and long-lived. (Science Magazine)It remains uncertain what might have powered this surprisingly intense lunar magnetic field. “It’s hard to understand how the moon’s magnetic field could be as strong as it seemed given how the moon has a very small core,” Weiss said. “The moon’s core is maybe one-fifth to one-seventh the radius of the moon, while Earth’s core is maybe one-half the planetary radius. This means the surface of the moon is much farther away from its core than you see with Earth. Since magnetic fields fall rapidly in strength with distance, it’s hard to understand how the moon could have had a magnetic field that was that strong all the way to its surface.” (Space.com)Q. Why is it so surprising that a lunar dynamo may have been so intense and long-lived? A. Both the strong intensity and long duration of lunar fields are surprising because of the moon’s small size. Convection, which is thought to power all known dynamos in the solar system today, is predicted to produce surface magnetic fields on the moon at least 10 times weaker than what we observe recorded in ancient lunar rocks. (PhysOrg)This unexpectedly strong field, now detectable only in remnant magnetism in lunar rocks, is challenging current theories of how magnetic fields are created by convection-driven dynamos in liquid cores.  Weiss said they are trying to think up “exotic” theories:There are other more exotic mechanisms that scientists have suggested could have powered the lunar dynamo.“One involves smacking the moon obliquely with large impacts from asteroids maybe a bunch of times,” Weiss said. “You could also use the fact that the moon’s spin wobbles over time, which is called precession, and it wobbled a lot more intensely in the past when it was closer to Earth, and that could also instill motion to power a dynamo. Both these mechanisms are not known in any planetary body today, and would represent new ways of generating magnetic fields.”In science, it’s not good to dream up special cases to save a theory.  Yet Weiss goes on: “Maybe there were multiple dynamo mechanisms operating at different times in lunar history,” he says, compounding the special pleading.  It seems that the dynamo theory has some serious reckoning to do to fit the observations:Much remains unknown about the moon’s magnetic field. “We still don’t know when the lunar dynamo turned off,” Weiss said. “There’s evidence it lasted until at least 3.3 billion years ago, and perhaps as long as 1.3 billion years ago, really pushing the limits of what we know can power the lunar dynamo.“Those dates don’t come from the magnetic field signatures in the rocks, but rather from consensus ideas about the age of the moon.  It would seem appropriate with this much surprise to consider alternative views.  At CMI, for instance, Dr. D. Russell Humphreys analyzed lunar magnetization, and found that no dynamo is necessary to explain the field.  The stronger-than-expected field is a problem for belief the moon is billions of years old, he showed.  This is also true for Mercury, he wrote at CMI in 2012 based on results from the MESSENGER orbiter.Other lunar mysteriesLava-filled craters:  Like Mercury, the moon has some craters with flat floors that appear to have been filled in with lava.  Scientists publishing a paper in Icarus studied 170 craters with “anomalously shallow fractured floors” and concluded that they formed via magmatic intrusions followed by sills, indicating volcanic activity from deep inside near the surface in the past.  This is not the same as volcanic activity caused by large impacts as hypothesized for the maria.Dikes at depth:  Geology published a paper about deep volcanic dikes, from 20 km down, evident in grabens on the lunar surface.  “Such dike geometric properties are only plausible if a mechanically weak lunar lithosphere was under extension at the time of dike emplacement.”Debris breakdown:  Ejecta debris, including large rocks, breaks down faster than expected, according to another paper in Geology.  “This result implies shorter rock survival times than predicted based on downward extrapolation of 100 m crater size-frequency distributions,” the scientists say, some from NASA and JPL.Add this observational fact to the list of evidences for a young solar system.  These observations are only a problem for the moyboys.  One would expect an original magnetic field to decay rapidly, as it continues to do so for the Earth.  Notice how the secular planetary scientists always reach for the favorite ad-hoc rescue device?  (Impacts.)  Not only are impacts unreproducible, they would have had to be finely tuned to achieve whatever effect is required to keep the moyboys from getting expelled from the science lab. (Visited 52 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Read more…

Citizens of Toledo approve the Lake Erie Bill of Rights

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Kolt Buchenroth and Matt ReeseThe Lake Erie Bill of Rights was passed by the citizens of Toledo in a special election held on Tuesday, Feb. 26. According to the results from the Lucas County Board of elections, the measure was passed by a vote of 61.4% to 38.6% with only 8.9% of voters turning out to the polls.There was a failed attempt to get this on the 2018 November ballot in Toledo. The effort to get LEBOR on the ballot was supported by out-of-state interests but it could have a very real in-state impact for a wide range of businesses. LEBOR opens up the possibility of thousands of lawsuits against any entity that could be doing harm to Lake Erie. This includes agricultural operations.“Farm Bureau members are disappointed with the results of the LEBOR vote. Our concern remains that its passage means Ohio farmers, taxpayers and businesses now face the prospect of costly legal bills fighting over a measure that likely will be found unconstitutional and unenforceable,” said Adam Sharp, executive vice president, Ohio Farm Bureau Federation. “Nevertheless, Farm Bureau members remain committed to finding and implementing real solutions to the lake’s challenges.”LEBOR grants rights to Lake Erie and empowers any Toledo citizen to file lawsuits on behalf of the lake. It gives Toledoans authority over nearly 5 million Ohioans, thousands of farms, more than 400,000 businesses and every level of government in 35 northern Ohio counties plus parts of Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New York and Canada. LEBOR was passed despite the prevailing legal opinion that many of its provisions are unconstitutional.“It says the lake should be free of pollution and things that could harm the lake. It makes the lake act as a person almost who can bring charges against people for harming it,” said Leah Curtis, director of agricultural law for Ohio Farm Bureau. “There is a concern that agriculture would be one of those industries that would be charged or sued with these lawsuits that could potentially come out of this charter amendment. It could really apply to anyone —not just agriculture — anyone who does something that might end up harming the lake. It could be a leaky septic system or other industries that may have permits that put limitations on what they can and cannot do. The Lake Erie Bill of Rights also invalidates those permits if those permits allow for any harm to Lake Erie. It has wide reaching effects. It has issues for lots of areas.”The day after LEBOR was approved by Toledo voters, Wood County farmer Mark Drewes filed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality and legal status of the Lake Erie Bill of Rights. Drewes’ suit was filed in the Federal District Court for Northern Ohio.Drewes Farm Partnership is a family crop operation in Custar with a significant history of being dedicated to improving water quality. Drewes is on the board of directors for The Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association and a long-time member of Ohio Farm Bureau.“Mark’s farm is an example of the right way of doing things,” Sharp said. “He’s employing a variety of conservation practices, water monitoring systems, water control structures and uses variable rate enabled equipment and yet he’s vulnerable to frivolous lawsuits. We are proud that our member has stood up against this overreach, and his efforts will benefit all Farm Bureau members, farmers and protect jobs in Ohio.”OFBF has historically engaged in precedent setting court cases that potentially affect its members. Farm Bureau will actively assist Drewes and his legal team throughout this litigation to ensure members’ concerns are heard. OFBF’s legal staff will monitor developments, lend agricultural expertise and provide supporting information about agriculture’s efforts to protect water quality.Drewes is represented by the law firm Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP, which has extensive experience fighting against onerous government action.“The Charter Amendment is an unconstitutional and unlawful assault on the fundamental rights of family farms in the Lake Erie Watershed — like the Drewes’ fifth generation family farm,” said Thomas Fusonie, a partner at Vorys and one of the counsel for Drewes. “The lawsuit seeks to protect the Drewes’ family farm from this unconstitutional assault.”The suit argues LEBOR violates federal constitutional rights, including equal protection, freedom of speech and is unenforceable for its vagueness. A request for preliminary and permanent injunction was also filed seeking to prevent enforcement of the law.“Farmers want and are working toward improving water quality, but this new Toledo law hurts those efforts. Mark Drewes understands this, and it’s Farm Bureau’s job to back his important actions on behalf of Ohio farmers,” Sharp said.last_img read more

Read more…

TBIoptions: Promoting Knowledge Webinar

first_imgMake plans to attend the TBIoptions: Promoting Knowledge web conference at 10:00 a.m. CST on Wednesday, April 17, presented by Debra Sellers, Ph.D.The conference is a 75-minute webinar that will provide a general understanding of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and available resources for survivors and their families. Promoting KnowledgeA person with TBI (a survivor) may experience physical effects, changes in thinking and communication, and alterations in emotional well-being and behavior. The program will include a series of topics including the “basics” of traumatic brain injury; the impact of TBI on survivors physically, cognitively, emotionally, and behaviorally; the consequences of TBI for survivors in relationships, activities of daily living, and work; and how individuals and communities can support survivors and their families.PresenterDebra M. Sellers, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor and Extension Specialist in Adult Development & Aging, School of Family Studies and Human Services, Kansas State University. Her primary area of interest is adaptive living for people with aging-related limitations or disabilities and their families and caregivers, with an emphasis on supporting functional abilities through access to services and technology. Debra has more than 15 years of experience serving adults with disabilities, older adults, and families in a variety of settings, including long-term care facilities, retirement communities and government agencies. She is a former member of the Kansas Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Board, was voted as one of her city’s most admired people (Manhattan, KS), and is a volunteer puppy raiser for Canine Companions for Independence®.No registration is required to join the web conference, simply go to TBIoptions: Promoting Knowledge to attend. The site will provide handouts associated with the presentation and a direct link to join the event.This post was written by Rachel Brauner of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service-Wounded Warrior Program and is part of a series of Military Caregiving posts published on the Military Families Learning Network blog.last_img read more

Read more…

Warners Bay and Chancellor taste Schools Cup glory

first_imgEden RichardsThe girls of Chancellor State College and the boys of Warners Bay High School have taken out their respective divisions of the Harvey Norman National Schools Cup.Chancellor were near unstoppable against Helensvale in the Girls Grand Final, running out 8-3 winners in a one-sided affair.The girls from Sippy Downs scored the first four touchdowns of the match to lead 4-0 at half-time, before continuing to pile on the pressure in the second stanza.The score blew out to 6-0 early in the second half before Helensvale hit back to add some respectability to the scoreboard, but the damage had been done to give Chancellor a well-deserved victory.Courtney Fietz scored a double for the victors, while Nikiah Campbell crossed twice for Helensvale in what was a good performance in a losing side.After watching the girls leave it all on the field, it was time for the boys to show the onlookers on the Sunshine Coast what they were capable of.In what was an exciting contest, Warners Bay and St Edward’s College traded touchdowns early on in their grand final, with neither side able to form any sort of a lead.It hit 3-all halfway through the first half before Warners Bay began to run over the top of their opponents late in the first stanza.Warners Bay used their superior field position and strong possession to jump to a 6-4 lead at half-time, and St Edward’s were going to need a huge effort in the second 20 to mount a comeback.St Edward’s had to be the first to score in the second half and they did just that, crossing the line after a 12-minute stalemate in which both teams continued to turn the ball over.At 6-5 with five minutes to play it was anyone’s match to win, but Warners Bay simply wanted it more, crossing twice in a row to lead 8-5 with four minutes to go.St Edward’s scored a consolation touchdown in the dying minutes, but it was Warners Bay who secured a hard-fought victory.Joshua Fredrickson and Kobe Mcwilliams scored doubles for Warners Bay, while Sandon Smith crossed twice for St Edward’s.last_img read more

Read more…

FortisBC says customers can resume normal gas use following pipeline fire

first_imgThe Canadian Press Companies mentioned in this story: (TSX:FTS) (TSX:ENB) SURREY, B.C. — The company that supplies natural gas to homes and businesses around British Columbia says customers can go back to normal use after an explosion and fire in a pipeline that forced a plea for conservation.FortisBC had asked consumers to turn down the thermostat as supplies were limited to 50 to 80 per cent of normal levels during some of the coldest months of the year.A blast in early October shut down the Enbridge natural gas pipeline about 15 kilometres northeast of Prince George.A news release from the utility says the increased pipeline capacity, warmer weather and conservation efforts have allowed the supply to reach normal levels. Fortis says in a statement that people should still continue be mindful of their energy use until the Enbridge pipeline is back to 100 per cent capacity.There were no injuries when the pipeline exploded and the RCMP says it does not suspect criminal activity, but the cause of the blast has yet to be determined.last_img read more

Read more…

Kejriwal endorses sacked BSF jawan pitted against Modi

first_imgNew Delhi: Lauding former BSF constable Tej Bahadur Yadav for “challenging” Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Varanasi, Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal Tuesday said there is “something in the soil of Haryana”, the state from where the sacked jawan hails. In a tweet, the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) convener said that in the 2014 general elections too, someone from Haryana– referring to himself– had taken on Modi in Varanasi. Yadav, the former Border Security Force (BSF) jawan, who was was dismissed in 2017 after complaining about the quality of food, was Monday declared as the candidate of the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP), Samajwadi Party (SP) and Rashtriya Lok Dal (RLD) alliance in Uttar Pradesh. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss account details under automatic exchange framework “There is something in the soil of Haryana. Last time too, someone (himself) from Haryana had challenged Modi ji in Varanasi, this time too Haryana’s jawan has locked horns with Modi ji. Best wishes to the SP-BSP alliance candidate from the entire nation,” Kejriwal tweeted. Born and brought up in Haryana, Kejriwal had contested against Modi in the 2014 general elections but lost to him by over 3 lakh votes. Varanasi goes to polls in the last phase of the ongoing elections on May 19.last_img read more

Read more…

How it came to be The forced resignation of Jim Tressel

For nearly three months, Jim Tressel’s punishment progressively grew more severe, despite a lack of NCAA instruction or new hard evidence further faulting the coach. What started as a slap on the wrist – a two-game suspension and $250,000 fine – ultimately became an indirect pink slip – his forced resignation. Ohio State planned to keep Tressel until the backing for such a measure eroded and external pressure heightened, said athletic director Gene Smith, who voiced his support for Tressel for most of the 12 weeks the coach was under siege. “Our intent was to retain him as our head coach,” Smith told The Lantern on Tuesday. “When you look at his body of work and what he accomplished, you look at this one action and try to take that in total perspective. I felt that (retaining him) was the best thing for the kids who he had recruited to his program and who were here.” The two-game ban didn’t last long. Nine days after a March 8 press conference in which Tressel admitted to his role in covering up OSU’s offseason scandal, Tressel asked for his suspension to be upped to five games. “I request of the university that my sanctions now include five games so that the players and I can handle this adversity together,” Tressel said in a statement on March 17. The coach and his players never got the opportunity to deal with the adversity together. On May 30, Tressel resigned, though not until OSU released its response to the NCAA’s Notice of Allegations last Friday did the university publicize that it “sought and accepted” Tressel’s resignation. “The University eventually determined that it was in the best interest of the University and Tressel for Tressel to resign, and he agreed to do so,” OSU’s response to the NCAA reads. Outside pressure forced the university’s hand, Smith said. “As we went on and had conversations about expanding it to five games and then ultimately asking him for his resignation, the support had deteriorated for Jim,” Smith said. “The brand of the institution was now at stake in a greater form. We were constantly under attack, and so when I sat down with him that Sunday night and had that conversation, there was no hesitation on his part when I asked him for his resignation. “It was a process, and we moved to a point where we just felt that the brand of the institution was at stake and we just needed to separate our employment relationship and try to restore the brand of the institution.” Through email conversations with former OSU walk-on Christopher Cicero, now an attorney, Tressel knew of Terrelle Pryor and DeVier Posey’s involvement in selling memorabilia to Eddie Rife, owner of Fine Line Ink tattoo parlor. Cicero warned Tressel that Rife dealt drugs. Heeding that warning, Tressel kept quiet. Rife pleaded guilty on June 28 to charges of selling marijuana and laundering drug money. When university officials discovered the email chain between Tressel and Cicero, OSU suspended Tressel for two games for his failure to pass along his knowledge to the appropriate university figureheads. Tressel reached out via email to Ted Sarniak, Pryor’s mentor from his hometown of Jeanette, Pa., but never contacted Smith, President E. Gordon Gee or anyone in the OSU compliance department. In Tressel’s response to the NCAA Notice of Allegations, his attorney, Gene Marsh, wrote, “He prioritized those concerns as his focus on the safety of the student-athletes, the gravity of the federal criminal investigation, and the request for confidentiality made by the individual who provided the information. At the time, those concerns trumped any thought he had relating to possible NCAA rules violations.” Smith said when he learned of Tressel’s wrongdoing, he was understanding given the coach’s precarious situation. “I kind of understood it for a while as I first looked at it,” Smith said. “I said, ‘OK, I see that.’ But obviously, the infractions are sitting right in front of you, so I couldn’t get by that. You have a responsibility as an NCAA member to ensure compliance. To make that decision on your own without at least bringing it to me or university general counsel, I have a hard time with it.” Tressel spent a decade as a luminary figure in Columbus, supported by OSU fans appreciative of the program’s winning tradition and of his influence in the community. That’s what made his actions so difficult to swallow, Smith said. “I was totally shocked and surprised and really disappointed when I first heard of his decision and saw the emails,” Smith said. “Every single level of emotion went through me. I was dumbfounded as to why he would make a decision on his own and not share that information and ask for help.” Smith touched on a number of topics during his interview Tuesday with The Lantern. On his confidence in the athletics compliance department: “I never wavered on them. There are things that we can do better and we have been creative, you saw some of those things in our response that we’re going to implement and they’re focused on particular issues, not broad-based compliance.” On whether the NCAA needs to adapt some of its rules to coincide with today’s world: “A lot of the rules in our books need to be modified to where we are today. There’s a number of rules in our books that were put in place in the ‘80s, some even in the ‘70s. They’re not applicable to today’s culture and today’s reality.” On how he went about selecting media members to attend a private press conference last week to discuss OSU’s response to the NCAA’s Notice of Allegations: “We just focused on people that I’d worked with for a long time and wanted to have a discussion and that’s what we did. In the moment at the time, I did what I felt what I needed to do relative to the message.” OSU will start its season Sept. 3 against Akron under Tressel’s replacement, Luke Fickell. read more

Read more…

From Boston to Buckeye Nation Bill Belichicks daughter coaching at OSU

Add New England Patriots’ coach Bill Belichick’s name to the ever-growing list of people who consider themselves Ohio State fans. Or, at least, that’s the way his daughter sees it. Assistant women’s lacrosse coach Amanda Belichick, 27, said her father has become an OSU fan since she started coaching at OSU. She said it helps that her father also has close ties to OSU football coach Urban Meyer and former Patriots linebacker Mike Vrabel, now the defensive line coach at OSU. Many of her father’s former assistants have moved toward the college ranks. “I think with Bill O’Brien going to Penn State, he’s (her father) spreading his wings in the college world,” she said. “It’s great to see that Patriots connection out here.” While her father is known for being rather short with the media, Amanda Belichick, a graduate of Wesleyan University, spoke candidly about growing up as the daughter of an NFL coach. “People give him a hard time for not divulging too much information, but that’s, you know, not his job,” Amanda Belichick said. Growing up as the daughter as one of the most successful coaches in NFL history, one might assume that coaching would be a natural progression for Amanda Belichick. “I have a lot of memories of watching him breakdown film and drawing out plays and analyzing a game plan,” she said. But she said she hadn’t even considered coaching until after graduating from Wesleyan University in 2007 when she took a job coaching high school lacrosse, soccer and ice hockey at a boarding school in Connecticut. “I worked in the admissions office and it was kind of my full-time job,” she said. “What I loved about that job, and coaching was such a small part of it, was the coaching.” She stuck with lacrosse because it was something that she had been around her entire life. “We’ve always been a lacrosse family,” she said. “It’s been my passion, it’s one of his (her father) passions.” Amanda Belichick followed coach Alexis Venechanos to OSU from the University of Massachusetts where the pair helped lead the Minutewomen to an Atlantic-10 championship in 2010. Now that she is in coaching, having an NFL head coach for a father does have its advantages, she said. “I’ve really had an opportunity to work with him and talk about preparation and really evolve the way I prepare for my own, whether its practice or evaluating ourselves or evaluating our opponents,” she said. “Those are things that I’ve really been able to take from him.” But Amanda Belichick said her and her father’s relationship goes beyond coaching. “There are a lot of things that are personal that have nothing to do with sports that we can connect on,” she said. These topics include things like movies, books and a passion for history, she said. Amanda Belichick joked that during the weeks leading up to the Super Bowl, she can only reach her father in the very early morning or very late at night. She said during a week like this she understands he’s busy and never tries to hold him up. When the ball is kicked off Sunday from Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Ind., Amanda Belichick said she will be watching with the same nervous excitement that she watches all her father’s big games with. “You want the best for your father and you want to see him be successful,” she said. “I know how hard he works. To see him go out and win games is great.” The Patriots organization and the OSU women’s lacrosse team did not immediately respond to The Lantern’s request for comment. The Patriots and New York Giants will play in Super Bowl XLVI at 6:30 p.m., Sunday. Tight end Jake Ballard and center Jim Cordle are both former Buckeyes and are on the Giants’ active roster. read more

Read more…