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Eddie Nketiah bags hat-trick as Arsenal thrash Charlton ahead of Premier League restart

first_imgAdvertisement Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 6 Jun 2020 7:12 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link6.6kShares Nketiah scored a hat-trick (Picture: MB Media/Getty)Eddie Nketiah scored a hat-trick as Arsenal won a behind-closed-doors friendly against Charlton on Saturday. Arsenal controlled proceedings at the Emirates, taking a 2-0 lead at half-time courtesy of goals from Alexandre Lacazette and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang. Lacazette struck from outside the box to open the scoring, with Aubameyang scoring a curled effort after a darting run from the left-hand side to double the Gunners’ lead.The second half was the Nketiah show. ADVERTISEMENTHis first goal was a scrappy one. He reacted quickest to a goalmouth scramble that came from a Dani Ceballos free-kick. He then coolly slotted home a one-on-one to put Arsenal 4-0 up. Comment Advertisement Arteta’s side got the win (Picture: Getty)He completed his hat-trick by heading home a cross from Joe Willock. AdvertisementAdvertisementWillock then grabbed a goal of his own, finding the top-left corner from outside the area to cap off an impressive day at the office for Mikel Arteta’s side. Arsenal return to Premier League action a week on Wednesday when they face defending champions Manchester City. More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalThey will hope to make a last dash for a top-four spot but they are currently eight points behind fourth-placed Chelsea in ninth. Should they win their game in hand against City, however, they will be right back in the mix, leapfrogging Spurs, Wolves and Sheffield United – although the Blades also have a game in hand against relegation-threatened Aston Villa – into sixth, just two points behind Manchester United.Should Eddie Nketiah start vs Man City?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your resultsFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Eddie Nketiah bags hat-trick as Arsenal thrash Charlton ahead of Premier League restartlast_img read more

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Is Euthanasia a health priority for New Zealand at present?

first_imgUniversity of Otago 9 September 2020Family First Comment: “Judging by the experience in Oregon it is likely that this may only benefit a small number of older educated white people. The health system is currently significantly stretched by the extra demands and changes required because of Covid-19… Hospices currently have to fundraise for 60% of their costs. Only one in three people dying in New Zealand are supported by a hospice. There are 33 hospice services in New Zealand but there is inevitably limited service to rural areas and smaller centres. Given this limitation of access, and the extent of fundraising required, there is a strong argument to prioritise funding to hospices as an effective and non-contentious strategy to decrease suffering at the end of life. This may also decrease the demand for euthanasia.”At the next election voters will be asked to answer the referendum question “Do you support the End of Life Choice Act 20191 coming into force?” If a majority vote Yes then this Act will come into force without further amendment.The focus of discussion has almost exclusively been around the ethical question of whether, in the circumstances described in the Act, it is ethical to proceed with medically assisted aid in dying. There has been little discussion about whether, if we accept this is ethical, introducing a regimen to enable this is a sufficient current health priority to justify the funding required to operationalise the Act.If this level of demand is reflected in New Zealand, then it will benefit a small but increasing number of people over time likely from a group who can afford the costs and who already get significant benefit from our health system. The result of enacting this Act will be to increase health outcome disparities…we will be providing an additional service to educated white people. The opportunity cost to the State will be higher if this is State funded. If privately funded there will be a smaller opportunity cost to the State of running the accountability bureaucracy, but the service will only be available to those who can afford it.A lot of effort has already gone into this debate. No matter what the outcome, the opposing sides are both likely to continue to be active. If it is passed, those opposed will probably lobby to try to limit the application of the Act. If it is not passed, then proponents will probably continue to lobby to re-litigate at a future date. In the meantime political parties are likely to pay more attention to issues at the end of life. Hospices currently have to fundraise for 60% of their costs.7 Only one in three people dying in New Zealand are supported by a hospice.8 There are 33 hospice services in New Zealand but there is inevitably limited service to rural areas and smaller centres. Given this limitation of access, and the extent of fundraising required, there is a strong argument to prioritise funding to hospices as an effective and non-contentious strategy to decrease suffering at the end of life. This may also decrease the demand for euthanasia.Changing the status quo now will require focus on this issue and take attention away from the much more serious issues of responding to the Covid-19 pandemic and to the Simpson review of the health system.The ethical debate is unlikely to reach consensus. However, this referendum is also about allocating scarce health care resources on providing an assisted dying service (assuming it has an element of state funding), which will disproportionately be used by the affluent and educated. As well as considering the ethics of euthanasia we also need to consider whether the funding needed to set up and run an assisted dying service would be better spent on other priorities such as reducing disparities in cancer screening, diagnosis and care services or supporting and improving the provision of palliative care.READ MORE: https://blogs.otago.ac.nz/pubhealthexpert/2020/09/09/is-euthanasia-a-health-priority-for-new-zealand-at-present/last_img read more

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