Tag: 2020娱乐信息论坛

After Texas Shooting, Governor Wolf Urges Lawmakers to Stop Delay of Gun Safety Measures

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter After Texas Shooting, Governor Wolf Urges Lawmakers to Stop Delay of Gun Safety Measures National Issues,  Press Release,  Public Safety Harrisburg, PA – “It has been more than three months since the tragedy in Parkland, Florida, yet state lawmakers have failed to pass any gun safety measures to my desk. Now, after another massacre has taken the lives of innocent kids, we must act.“In the coming weeks, I look forward to working with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to enact targeted measures to improve school safety. Our School Safety Task Force is nearing completion of its regional meetings and there is broad agreement on strengthening Pennsylvania’s Safe Schools initiative and providing better tools for law enforcement, schools, students, and parents to prevent violence. But this is no substitute from real action to protect all our constituents from dangerous individuals having access to firearms. We are failing them if we cannot protect them.“Senate Bill 501, which would keep guns from domestic abusers, has not been called for a vote in the House despite passing the Senate exactly two months ago today. Over and over again, we see a nexus between domestic abuse and access to firearms being a recipe for mass violence. This bill has broad support from victim, law enforcement, and gun safety advocates. Yet, despite public and private requests by my administration, this bill continues to be held up. House Republican leaders need to free this bill from committee and bring it to the House floor this week.“Over and over again, deadly mass shootings are committed with high-powered long guns. Yet, in Pennsylvania, these guns, including weapons of war like an AR-15, can be purchased in a private sale without requiring a background check by the Pennsylvania State Police. I continue to urge the House and Senate to close this loophole to reduce the likelihood of a known dangerous individual from getting access to these potentially deadly weapons.“I urge the House and Senate to expedite action on these bipartisan, commonsense proposals.”center_img May 21, 2018last_img read more

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Kiwis back gay marriage – poll

first_imgStuff.co.nz 7 June 2012Nearly two-thirds of New Zealanders back a legal change to allow gay marriage, a new poll suggests. The 63 per cent behind same-sex marriage in a TVNZ poll released last night has fuelled calls for Parliament to introduce legislation for the change. Green Party MP Kevin Hague said he planned to introduce a bill at the next member’s ballot, but would be happy for the Government to adopt his measure. “It is time for New Zealand to amend our laws to reflect the change in society’s views on same-sex marriage,” Hague said. “Twice as many New Zealanders now support same sex marriage as oppose it.” The former Labour-led Government passed a law allowing civil unions between same-sex couples in 2004 but gay marriage has since largely fallen off the political agenda in New Zealand.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/7057118/Kiwis-back-gay-marriage-polllast_img read more

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Is Euthanasia a health priority for New Zealand at present?

first_imgUniversity of Otago 9 September 2020Family First Comment: “Judging by the experience in Oregon it is likely that this may only benefit a small number of older educated white people. The health system is currently significantly stretched by the extra demands and changes required because of Covid-19… Hospices currently have to fundraise for 60% of their costs. Only one in three people dying in New Zealand are supported by a hospice. There are 33 hospice services in New Zealand but there is inevitably limited service to rural areas and smaller centres. Given this limitation of access, and the extent of fundraising required, there is a strong argument to prioritise funding to hospices as an effective and non-contentious strategy to decrease suffering at the end of life. This may also decrease the demand for euthanasia.”At the next election voters will be asked to answer the referendum question “Do you support the End of Life Choice Act 20191 coming into force?” If a majority vote Yes then this Act will come into force without further amendment.The focus of discussion has almost exclusively been around the ethical question of whether, in the circumstances described in the Act, it is ethical to proceed with medically assisted aid in dying. There has been little discussion about whether, if we accept this is ethical, introducing a regimen to enable this is a sufficient current health priority to justify the funding required to operationalise the Act.If this level of demand is reflected in New Zealand, then it will benefit a small but increasing number of people over time likely from a group who can afford the costs and who already get significant benefit from our health system. The result of enacting this Act will be to increase health outcome disparities…we will be providing an additional service to educated white people. The opportunity cost to the State will be higher if this is State funded. If privately funded there will be a smaller opportunity cost to the State of running the accountability bureaucracy, but the service will only be available to those who can afford it.A lot of effort has already gone into this debate. No matter what the outcome, the opposing sides are both likely to continue to be active. If it is passed, those opposed will probably lobby to try to limit the application of the Act. If it is not passed, then proponents will probably continue to lobby to re-litigate at a future date. In the meantime political parties are likely to pay more attention to issues at the end of life. Hospices currently have to fundraise for 60% of their costs.7 Only one in three people dying in New Zealand are supported by a hospice.8 There are 33 hospice services in New Zealand but there is inevitably limited service to rural areas and smaller centres. Given this limitation of access, and the extent of fundraising required, there is a strong argument to prioritise funding to hospices as an effective and non-contentious strategy to decrease suffering at the end of life. This may also decrease the demand for euthanasia.Changing the status quo now will require focus on this issue and take attention away from the much more serious issues of responding to the Covid-19 pandemic and to the Simpson review of the health system.The ethical debate is unlikely to reach consensus. However, this referendum is also about allocating scarce health care resources on providing an assisted dying service (assuming it has an element of state funding), which will disproportionately be used by the affluent and educated. As well as considering the ethics of euthanasia we also need to consider whether the funding needed to set up and run an assisted dying service would be better spent on other priorities such as reducing disparities in cancer screening, diagnosis and care services or supporting and improving the provision of palliative care.READ MORE: https://blogs.otago.ac.nz/pubhealthexpert/2020/09/09/is-euthanasia-a-health-priority-for-new-zealand-at-present/last_img read more

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