Dr Dabbers Boost Is a Fine Vape and Thats About It

first_img The Boost is a totally different class of vape. It’s portable, yeah, but only technically. It stands more than 10 inches and has an awkward, imposing presence. Plus, it comes in a padded metal case that reminds me of something you’d use for a weapon.All this is because the Boost is a high-powered concentrate rig. Like the Aurora, you won’t be able to use any herbs with this machine. And given the high temps needed to properly vaporize concentrate, this beast is built to deliver a ton of power, really quickly. That, of course, gives a harsh flavor, so the Boost also includes a percolator. This pulls the vapor through water, cooling the vapor and filtering out some of the unwanted particulates.Build quality is solid, with a sturdy base packed with magnets and rubber O-rings that hold the rig together. It comes apart easily enough and can be stashed back into the case, but you probably won’t want to run the thing around too much as even disassembled, it’s still on the bulkier side.Once you get past that, though, the Boost is a capable machine. It seems intimidating, and you may have to go over the instructions a few times, but all-told, it is, if anything, a bit too simple. You won’t get variable temperature settings as it runs continuously for 60-ish seconds before shutting off. During that time, the Boost will get hotter and hotter — so take that into account. There’s also not really any other features or drawbacks. What you see is what you get.Vapor quality is consistent and potent. Be careful, even with the water filtration; it’s easy to overdo the Boost. You’ll also get quite a few sessions — up to 30 — on one charge. Beyond that, there’s not much to talk about. The biggest advantage here is the price and solid functionality. A comparable home set-up can often run far, far higher than the Boost’s comparatively easy-to-swallow $150 price tag. Plus, most oil or concentrate-based rigs come with what I’m going to call a “sketch” factor.There’s not much appeal to heating up a nail with a blowtorch and then inhaling whatever comes out. The boost is clean-cut by comparison. It’s still not what I’d call a glamorous experience (it’s no Hydrology 9), but it’s worth a look if you prefer oils to herbs.ProsPowerhouseEasy to useGreat price pointConsA bit intimidatingOnly uses concentrateNo extra bells and whistlesBottom LineThe Boost is an imposing, albeit simple rig for vaping oils and concentrates. It gets the job done, but if you’re looking for anything fancy, you might want to shop around. Stay on target DaVinci MIQRO Vaporizer Review: Vaping Gets TinyMysterious Incident at E-Cig Plant Left 29 Sick, Fire Chief “Bewildere… last_img read more

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Visit Akihabaras Dragon QuestThemed Convenience Store

first_imgStay on target How AMC’s ‘The Terror’ Uses American History to Delive…33 Killed in Suspected Arson Attack on Kyoto Animation Studio in Japan If you’re a nerd who’s interested in Japan, you probably already know about Akihabara. It’s Tokyo’s Electric Town, a neighborhood of tons of electronics, video game, and anime stores. There’s a lot to do there, but today I want to highlight a convenience store. Yes, like 7-Eleven or Sheetz. But this one, tucked away at an intersection of alleys in Akiba, is special. It’s Dragon Quest-themed.If you like those cute blue slimes from Dragon Quest, or feel nostalgia that reaches back to the days of “Dragon Warrior” on the NES, you need to go to the Lawson Square Shop at 85 Kanda Neribeicho in Akihabara. Walk out of the Akihabara Station Electric Town exit, turn left, and walk past the Sega Club. Cross the street and turn right, then walk past another Sega Club, then a third Sega Club (I’m not kidding). Turn left at the Sofmap (which is facing a Taito Game Center, to change things up a bit from all the Sega Clubs) and walk a block. You’ll see a Lawson in the middle of two streets with loads of foot traffic and an occasional car barely making its way through. You’ll be able to tell from the blue Dragon Quest slimes in the windows and the vending machine painted to look like a treasure chest.Walk through the door, and a speaker will play either the staircase or random encounter sound effect from Dragon Quest. And, well, then you’ll be standing in a convenience store. But it’s a Dragon Quest convenience store!It’s actually pretty cramped for a Japanese convenience store (or “combini,” which are almost as plentiful as vending machines in Japan, and which tend to have a much better and higher quality selection of food). There are maybe four aisles, of which one and several endcaps are dedicated to Dragon Quest merchandise. But that’s the reason you want to go there.The store is filled with slimes. I mean the cute blue blob things with the smiling faces, that have been the standard enemy and mascot of the Dragon Quest series since the first game. There are slime slippers, slime t-shirts, slime hats, slime bags, slime umbrellas, and even slime glasses (which look adorable if you fill them with blue or red drinks, but if you fill them with cola they become super problematic). And, of course, there are slime omiyage (souvenir packs/boxes) in the form of tins and plastic tubs of candies.If you want to catch up on Dragon Quest, you can pick up all the recent games here, too. Besides the standard complement of e-shop point cards, this Lawson sells physical retail copies of all currently available Dragon Quest games for the Switch, 3DS, and PS4. They’re the Japanese versions, of course, but if you can read kana you can play them (just remember the 3DS is region-locked).This Lawson isn’t one of Akihabara’s big tourist spots. It isn’t a famous character cafe or a beloved video game store. It’s just a fun little combini that has a lot of Dragon Quest stuff in it, and it’s worth taking the wander to visit if you find yourself in Akiba.center_img Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more

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Everything Old Is New Again in Yakuza Kiwami 2

first_imgStay on target The Yakuza franchise has enjoyed a big boost in popularity this generation, especially in the West. Last year saw the release of Yakuza 0 and Yakuza Kiwami. The former is a prequel to the entire franchise, while the latter is a remake of the first game. It comes as no surprise to see the second installment also get the remake treatment in the form of Yakuza Kiwami 2. Like its predecessor, it is another excellent remake that manages to feel like an all-new game.Yakuza Kiwami 2 picks up almost directly after the original Kiwami. Following the tumultuous events of the previous game, series star Kiryu Kazuma now lives a peaceful existence. Since this wouldn’t make for an engaging gaming experience, it’s not long before Kiryu returns to the world of Japanese organized crime. He is the only one who can prevent an all-out war between two rival gangs. Things get personal when the head of one gang sees Kiryu as a direct rival. He’ll do anything to ensure he’s the only “dragon” in the Japanese underworld.AdChoices广告While Yakuza Kiwami 2 is a sequel, it does an admirable job of getting newcomers up to speed. Near the beginning, players have the option to view the events of the previous installment. This consists of cutscenes lifted straight from the game with narration by Kiryu. If you’re a first-timer, I highly recommend watching all of the cutscenes. This game’s story is highly dependent on the previous one. If you’ve already played Yakuza Kiwami, you can go ahead and skip this part and jump straight into the action.Besides the obvious graphical overhaul, Yakuza Kiwami 2 features content not found in the original Yakuza 2. The two most notable additions are a Clan Creator mode and a campaign focusing on Goro Majima. The former is a rather elaborate tower defense game involving Japanese wrestlers. The latter shows what happened to the beloved eye patch-wearing character after Yakuza Kiwami. On top of that, the entire game has a reworked script and voice-overs. Even if you’ve played Yakuza 2, there’s plenty new here.Structurally, Yakuza Kiwami 2 is no different from other entries. There are two main districts for players to visit: the fictional cities of Kamurocho and Sotenbori. Each city contains all manner of shops where players can dine or play mini-games. The streets are full of NPCs going about their daily lives. Some of these non-playable characters give the player sub-quests to fulfill. And it wouldn’t be a proper Yakuza experience without a whole lot of fighting. If you’ve played Yakuza games, then you’ll feel right at home here.The combat mechanics are every bit as deep as those found in fighting games. Kiryu can attack opponents with a series of punches and kicks. Various button combinations perform different attacks. Kiryu can also use weapons already on his person or dropped by enemies. These include knives, swords, clippers, brass knuckles, handguns, and more. Our hero can also use objects found in the environment. These include bicycles, traffic cones, billboards, furniture, and pretty much anything not nailed to the ground. Combat is so varied (and random) that it never ever gets boring. This is good considering how one spends so much time one spends in combat.Upgrades also help keep combat interesting. Everything from fighting thugs, eating at restaurants, and completing side quests awards players with points. They can use them to upgrade different attributes like health, strength, and defense. Players can also use points to unlock new fighting skills and passive abilities. You may have to do some grinding to acquire enough points to unlock new abilities. Given the number of activities available, you probably won’t have to actively grind very often.Like Yakuza 6, Yakuza Kiwami 2 runs on the Dragon Engine. Not only does this engine produce a stunning looking game, it also streamlines the overall experience. Players can now enter and exit buildings without seeing a loading screen. Transitioning into battles is just as effortless, and battles can even take place indoors. Fighting itself feels extremely smooth when compared to previous entries. Players can now run from a fight if they want. The new engine also makes it possible to have many more characters on-screen at once. Of course, this also means Kiryu can fight larger groups of foes. Japanese cities have many citizens and the Dragon Engine makes the game feel more authentic in that regard.The Dragon Engine breathes new life into the familiar locales of Kamurocho and Sotenbori. These familiar places look entirely new thanks to the updated graphics. The new engine gives everything in the environment a wonderful sense of realism. The new particle, lighting, and water effects also help make the world feel more alive. Those who’ve played Yakuza 6 will understand what I’m talking about regarding the Dragon Engine’s capabilities. First-timers will simply appreciate the gorgeous and detailed Japanese streets. This is as close as you can get to visiting Japan without actually being there.While the story of any Yakuza game is crucial, for me, the real heart and soul of the franchise lies with its various sidequests and mini-games. As you travel the world, you’ll run into many eccentric characters making strange demands. What makes these scenarios hilarious is the seriousness with which Kiryu undertakes them. Whether it’s posing for a photo shoot or finding someone’s lost cat, Kiryu is all business. Some quests have you simply finding an item or beating the crap out of dudes. Others are more involved. The biggest, most intricate side mission involves running a hostess club. But no matter their scope, the sidequests give the game a degree of charm you might not expect from a title with such a weighty story.Players can also unwind by playing mini-games. Games like miniature golf or batting cages will be familiar enough to Western audiences. Other activities like shogi or mahjong will feel completely foreign. Thankfully, each mini-game comes with exhaustive instructions on how to properly play them. I personally have a hard time wrapping my head around something like mahjong, but I’m glad it’s there for folks with patience to learn the rules.If you don’t want to play mini-games, you can visit any of the restaurants and convenience stores and fill up on some delicious Japanese food. Like every activity, eating provides players with experience points and bonuses. Some plate combinations actually give extra experience points. This encourages users to experiment with different plate combos. In general, it’s always good to visit restaurants to see what’s on the menu.My absolute favorite mini-games are found in the arcades. Since Yakuza is a Sega property, it’s no surprise that arcades have Sega games. Yakuza Kiwami 2 features fully playable versions of Virtual-On and Virtua Fighter 2. These are two of my favorite games of all time — especially Virtua Fighter 2. Both titles look and play great. There’s also a UFO catcher in the arcade. Like in the real world, using these machines to grab toys and prizes can be very frustrating since the catcher has such a loose grip. Whether you’re playing an arcade classic or pulling your hair out thanks to the UFO catcher, the arcades are awesome places to spend your time.Yakuza 2 is one of the most celebrated entries in the series so it’s right that it gets such a fantastic remake with Yakuza Kiwami 2. Everything about the game, including its graphics, story, characters, combat, side quests, mini games, and overall presentation is top notch. It truly feels like a brand-new entry despite being a remake. If you’re a fan of the franchise or have started the journey by playing Yakuza 0 and Yakuza Kiwami then picking up Yakuza Kiwami 2 is a no-brainer.Revisit this team’s game Yakuza 0 with the hands-on review on the game’s sixth edition. Check out the Fancy Collector’s Edition on the game too. Read our hands-on review of this creative team’s other game H1Z1:Battle Royale. Stay up to date on all PlayStation 4 games news here.   Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.center_img PlayStation 4 Becomes Fastest Console to Sell 100 Million‘Death Stranding’ Is Your PlayStation 4 Holiday Exclusive last_img read more

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Dangerous Driving Is an Imperfect Burnout Successor

first_img Trade In Your Nintendo Switch For a Better Battery (With a Catch)Get Used to ‘Fortnite’s’ Powerful Mech Suits Despite throwing us a bone with last year’s Burnout Paradise Remastered, EA has all but abandoned its over-the-top racing franchise. Thankfully, we have Three Fields Entertainment who is more than willing to give Burnout fans what they want. Comprised of former Burnout developers, Three Fields tested the waters with the Danger Zone series. Those were decent, but only featured its take on crash mode. Now we have the full Burnout-esque experience with Dangerous Driving. Though Dangerous Driving pales in comparison its obvious inspiration, it’s the closest thing we’ll get to a revival.If you loved Burnout 3: Takedown then you’ll feel right at home here. Dangerous Driving offers players a multitude of different racing modes. These include standard races, time attack, road rage, pursuit, face off, and elimination. Though you have different objectives in each category, all races involve you driving at ludicrous speeds and crashing into every opponent before you. Like Burnout, Dangerous Driving is a full-on arcade racer where you’ll rarely (if ever) take your finger off the accelerator. If you want a realistic driving experience then look elsewhere.Playing Dangerous Driving really does take you back to the days of Burnout 3 and Burnout Revenge. It’s actually somewhat jarring after coming off of the open world Burnout Paradise. The tracks are simple and straightforward. They’re mostly comprised of highways or rural roads. The name Dangerous Driving is fitting since you’ll oftentimes avoid crashing into oncoming traffic by the skin of your teeth. However, if you want to maintain boost then you’ll have no choice but to risk it all. You gain the most boost by crashing enemy vehicles, though you’ll also endanger your own vehicle in the process.AdChoices广告Slamming into cars to make them crash is just as exhilarating in Dangerous Driving as it was in Burnout. Bumping into a vehicle’s side and then having the game capture the crash through a cinema never gets old. In fact, crashing other vehicles becomes insanely addictive. It’s even awesome when you crash your own car. Yes, it will set you back, but seeing your vehicle turned into a blazing ball of fire is a thing of pure beauty. The crashes alone are worth the price of admission.While the driving mechanics are spot-on and the crashes glorious, I wish I could say the same thing about the tracks. The roads are linear and lend themselves nicely for driving at super-high speeds. The problem is most tracks look and feel the same. The backgrounds are different, but every road is nearly identical to the last. Because of that, it’s hard to play Dangerous Driving for long stretches before the same-y roads become tiresome. To be fair, the roads in Burnout 3 were mostly straightforward too, but they had enough variety to keep them interesting. The same isn’t true here.A twist Dangerous Driving has is how crashed vehicles remain on the road. This actually adds some variety to tracks since you’ll need to navigate around car husks with each subsequent lap. On the flip side, crashing headfirst into a vehicle you previously destroyed can get frustrating. None of the Burnout games have this feature so it’s actually quite cool Three Fields added this to prevent Dangerous Driving from being a complete Burnout clone.Speaking of new features, I want to single out pursuit mode. Here, you’ll get to drive a police vehicle and hunt down criminals. These cars do not go down easily and require players to slam into them repeatedly. If that sounds familiar it’s because this mode comes from Need for Speed. Considering how this was one of my favorite modes in Need for Speed (particularly the Hot Pursuit series), I’m all for its inclusion in Dangerous Driving. Pursuit isn’t native to Burnout but I don’t care. It’s great.Dangerous Driving’s “campaign” consists of events for different vehicle types. You begin with Sedans and eventually unlock Formula 1 cars. You need to finish missions within each category in order to unlock the next event. If you have equal love for every kind of race mode then this won’t pose a problem. However, if you’d rather participate in crash mode but have no choice but to play a time attack, you’re going to be annoyed. Though you unlock new vehicles by playing through all the modes, they’re all the same at the end of the day. This was also true back in Burnout 3, but now it feels like a slog, especially if you just want to play a specific race type.The ubiquitous Unreal Engine handles the high-speed action wonderfully. If you’re playing on the PS4 Pro or Xbox One X, you’ll experience Dangerous Driving at a buttery-smooth 60fps. I never once experienced any slow down or screen tearing issues. While the game runs exceptionally well, I admit the graphics aren’t anything special. In fact, Dangerous Driving looks like a high definition PS3 game. Since this is an independent title, I’ll let the graphics slide. It looks good, if not exceptional. It’s all about the racing, after all.With the exception of a title screen song, Dangerous Driving has no soundtrack. During my first 30 minutes, I drove around without any accompanying music. As you can imagine, this made the game feel lifeless. It was only after I dug into the options that I learned you can link Spotify with the game.Playing your own music via Spotify is an interesting idea that, sadly, ends up lacking. For one, you cannot turn on Spotify through the game. You need to minimize Dangerous Driving, go to the Spotify app on your console, open it, select a playlist, and then return to the game. To make matters worse, Dangerous Driving doesn’t integrate the music as well as it should. It would have been ideal to have the music get louder or lower depending on the on-screen action. You can skip between tracks or pause the music, but that’s about it. At the end of the day, you’re just blasting Spotify in the background, which feels very cheap.Let me not forget to address the elephant in the room: the fact you need a Spotify account in order to have music in Dangerous Driving. I already had a Spotify account so I was solid, but what about folks who don’t have the app? Asking users to have or opt into a separate subscription service is a bit much. Utilizing a user’s Spotify account no doubt saved Three Fields money on licensed music. I understand the economics behind this decision. Still, I can’t help but think about those who do not have Spotify or cannot afford it. They will not have nearly as much fun playing because there’s no music to enhance the driving experience.Dangerous Driving leaves me with mixed feelings. On the one hand, this is about as close to Burnout as you can get. All of the pieces which made that franchise so brilliant are here. Unfortunately, there are too many minor issues which prevent this from being everything it should be. The most glaring one is of course the Spotify integration. With that said, it’s a noble effort from Three Fields Entertainment. Despite its issues, Dangerous Driving is an enjoyable arcade racer that fans of the genre will enjoy. Hopefully, the game will be successful enough to make EA realize they need to release a new Burnout. If not, a Dangerous Driving 2 is something I’ll welcome with open arms.More on Geek.com:Hands-On: ‘Dreams’ Is Sony’s Wildly Ambitious Game MakerModus Games Upcoming Indie Titles Are Both Heartwarming and HeartbreakingThe ‘Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy’ Is Anime ‘Law & Order’ Stay on targetlast_img read more

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HandsOn Links Awakening Switch Remake Is a Gorgeous Dream

first_img Trade In Your Nintendo Switch For a Better Battery (With a Catch)Controller Patent Teases SNES Games on Switch Stay on target With so many video game “remakes” these days just being HD remasters of the original games, it’s nice to see more developers going back to their old classics and totally reimagining them from the ground up with the best of what modern technology can offer. The Resident Evil 2 remake provides stunning visuals. The Final Fantasy VII remake has more expressive storytelling. And after playing The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening on Nintendo Switch, I can tell you it has both.First off, how great is it that this game even exists on the Switch? As Nintendo’s next home console, it’s cool but expected for the system to have a huge 3D adventure like The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. But the Switch is also a portable, and as a continuation of that legacy I love that a remake of a Game Boy game can stand on that same pedestal. What I’m saying is, I’m glad this isn’t a 3DS game. I hope it’s a Switch Mini game, too.However, I am thankful for A Link Between Worlds on 3DS for creating this template for a modern top-down Zelda game. Link moves fluidity across the open world without pausing to swap between screens. The deceptively simple combat has you slashing with your sword, blocking with your shield, and monitoring enemy patterns for openings. Enemies even have new techniques like backing up while preparing to toss spears. I’ll admit it took me a beat to get used to this traditional combat after the rhythmic stylings of Cadence of Hyrule.AdChoices广告More important than the action though is the sense of adventure. And while I’ve already played Link’s Awakening before (it’s my favorite 2D Zelda because of how cozy and bonkers it is) seeing it in this new form felt like the first steps of something grand. I walked across the beach for my weapons, ventured into some spooky woods, and of course pushed some blocks around to find my way home. This was just the beginning of the game, before collecting clever puzzle-solving key items for charging and jumping and conjuring magic. And as the world opens up, you have more options for actively customizing your map, which feels very much like Breath of the Wild.Link’s Awakening on Switch promises to be faithful to the original, remixing the already wacky content where it makes sense and offering bonus features like a dungeon editor. But obviously the biggest improvement over the monochrome sprite-based Game Boy version is the absolutely gorgeous graphical style. Watching the adorable new Link we must protect trot his way through this tilt-shift toy diorama version of Koholint Island and its surrounding nature is arresting in person. Everything is so alluringly tangible and pleasingly soft and well-lit. The only reminder that this is a video game is an unstable framerate we hope gets fixed before the September 20 release date.The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening isn’t the only cool Switch game to look forward to. Here are some great Nintendo Switch games you can play right now.last_img read more

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HandsOn The Dark Crystal Age of Resistance Tactics Is Henson XCOM

first_img From its banger of a theme song to its intriguing war academy setting and mechanics, I’m pretty excited for Fire Emblem: Three Houses. Arguably the biggest game releasing on Nintendo Switch this month, Three Houses brings the hardcore strategy RPG series back to a console for the first in over a decade. However, in order to enjoy the thoughtful chess-like strategy gameplay and interpersonal unit romance gimmicks, you have to put up with a whole lot of anime. Ever since Fire Emblem Awakening on 3DS gave this series more popularity beyond Marth mains, it has tripled down on the anime.Fortunately, if you’re more into gothic fantasy Jim Henson puppets than blue-haired anime sword boys, you can get your strategy fix with the inexplicable Netflix video game tie-in The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance Tactics. And after playing it for myself, I can also say it’s shaping up to be inexplicably good.Based on the upcoming prequel, The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance Tactics tells the tale of… I have no idea. I have no familiarity with Dark Crystal aside from occasionally mistakenly thinking David Bowie is in it. The different little creatures that made up by units and the lore behind their various skills were completely lost on me. There was no voice-acting from the cast of the show to explain things. And the visuals, while pleasant, didn’t feel as tangible as something like Link’s Awakening which feels like a missed opportunity to honor the franchise’s practical puppet roots.AdChoices广告But I couldn’t tell you much about most Fire Emblem characters either and those games still rule. Based on my demo, The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance Tactics is cool where it counts: the gameplay. This is good for them if they’re going to evoke something as legendary as Final Fantasy Tactics. You know something clicks when you pull off a stunt like “flying a ranged character to high ground to improve the strength of their bow and then using their special skill to fire multiple arrows in a row.”Characters’ turns happen in a set order, which limits your options somewhat. However, you’ll later be able to alter the turn order, which opens up more room for sneaky tactics. The maps I played were small but dense, forcing different kinds of encounters fairly quickly. Along with simply walking up to an enemy and attacking them, I could knock over a nearby pillar to create a new path or smash some grunt. Dead bodies can be resurrected though if not fully exterminated. And later playthroughs might introduce full-on permadeath.It’s not that the Switch is lacking in turn-based strategy games. Beyond Fire Emblem we’ve got Wargroove, Into the Breach, Banner Saga and even that upcoming mobster game Empire of Sin from the Romeros. But as a fan of this genre I’ll gladly devour more. And fans of Dark Crystal, old ones or newcomers who watch the Netflix show, should appreciate the game even more when it releases later this year. For now, here are some other cool Nintendo Switch games to play. But with a Netflix show getting a game on Switch, where is Netflix itself on Switch? Stay on target Trade In Your Nintendo Switch For a Better Battery (With a Catch)Controller Patent Teases SNES Games on Switch last_img read more

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The next interface Electrical fields MGC3130 and your hand w Video

first_img Citation: The next interface: Electrical fields, MGC3130, and your hand (w/ Video) (2012, November 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-interface-electrical-fields-mgc3130-video.html According to the company, the MGC3130 can enable 3-D gesture recognition with power consumption as low as 150 microwatts in its active sensing state. More information: www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/ … px?dDocName=en560048 © 2012 Phys.org (Phys.org)—Microchip Technology has been working in the “non-contact user interface” space, which is translating into gesture control over your next computing device. The company is using electrical fields to sense hand movements. They have announced a controller that transmits an electrical signal and calculates the three-coordinate position of a hand based on the disturbances to the field the hand creates. Chandler, Arizona, based Microchip Technology, in looking at electrical fields to sense hand movements, issued this week’s announcement of “the world’s first electrical field based 3-D gesture controller, the MGC3130.” The new controller offers low-power, hand position tracking with gesture recognition. Its two promoted advantages are low cost and low power. The company is offering a development kit. A gesture library was constructed using algorithms that learned from how different people make the same movements, to be applied toward device functions such as .point, click, zoom, or scroll. Ten gestures were programmed into the device with recognition based on Markov models. According to the company, “the chip provides developers the flexibility to utilize pre-filtered electrode signals for additional functionality in their applications.”Gesture-recognition technology is familiar to those using game consoles, but the concept of gesture recognition could now become more mainstream with users of desktops, laptops, or smartphones, making use of gesture-control hovering motions. Microchip Technology said that it is already working with product manufacturers to implement user-input controls.The MGC3130 will cost $2.26 each in high volumes and volume production is expected in April 2013.center_img MGC3130’s design and configurable power modes represent the lowest power consumption of any 3-D sensing technology, says Microchip’s creators, and up to 90 percent lower than camera-based gesture systems.Microchip Technology is aiming its technology toward a range of devices; an easy vision of how it would translate into end use would be hand gesture recognition for smartphones and notebooks. The company said its chip will offer interaction with both mobile devices and consumer electronics. Its list of potential devices, for example, includes electronic readers, remote controls and game controllers. NEC unveils gesture controlling device This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Duo create GravityLight Lamp that runs off of gravity w video

first_img © 2012 Phys.org The dark side of kerosene lamps: High black-carbon emissions Citation: Duo create GravityLight: Lamp that runs off of gravity (w/ video) (2012, December 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-12-duo-gravitylight-lamp-gravity-video.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: www.indiegogo.com/projects/282006center_img Explore further (Phys.org)—London based designers Martin Riddiford and Jim Reeves have created what they are calling the GravityLight, an LED lamp that runs off of nothing but gravity. The purpose of the lamp is to provide people in third world countries with an alternative to kerosene lamps which cause burns and lung ailments to millions of people too poor to afford any other source of light. The lamp is as simple as it is inexpensive. A cable hangs from a gear mechanism holding onto a plastic bag filled with dirt or rocks. The energy created by gravity pulling the bag downwards is enough to power an LED bulb for up to half an hour. Riddiford and Reeves have posted their creation on the fund sourcing site indiegogo and thus far pledges have doubled the $55,000 goal.The two note on their page that over a billion and a half people in the world today have no access to a reliable electricity source. When it gets dark, their only light source comes through burning wood, peat, or other biomass materials – the most popular by far, is kerosene. They also note that the World Bank has recently estimated that up to three quarters of a billion women and children regularly inhale smoke from kerosene lanterns, which is they say, equivalent to smoking two packs of cigarettes a day – a situation that leads quite naturally to very high lung cancer rates. Also, millions of people are burned each year when kerosene lamps are accidently upended. There’s also the problem of carbon dioxide being added to the atmosphere – collectively about 244 million tonnes a year. All in all they paint a very dire picture. To help fix the problem, the two have spent the past four years looking for and building various lighting options and have now settled on their GravityLight.Their lamp has no batteries and is made in a way the two say will last for a very long time. The weight that drives the lamp is free and collectable virtually anywhere and providing a lamp that doesn’t have any recurring costs will allow, the two say, those that have relied on kerosene lamps to use the money they have been spending on fuel, for other essentials. The overall goal is an improved quality of life.The two expect the GravityLight to originally sell for just $10. After ramping up, they expect that cost to drop to just $5.last_img read more

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Genome study reveals history of European potato

first_img Explore further © 2019 Science X Network Journal information: Nature Ecology & Evolution Credit: CC0 Public Domain A team of researchers from Germany, Peru, the U.K. and Spain has sequenced a large number of potato varieties to learn more about the history of the modern European potato. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the group describes their study of the history of the potato and what they found. More information: Rafal M. Gutaker et al. The origins and adaptation of European potatoes reconstructed from historical genomes, Nature Ecology & Evolution (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41559-019-0921-3center_img Citation: Genome study reveals history of European potato (2019, June 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-genome-reveals-history-european-potato.html Discovery of genetic mechanism allowing potato cultivation in northern latitudes This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Prior research has shown that the potato was introduced to Europe in the 1600s—the first-known plantings were in Spain. The history of the potato in Europe after introduction has not been well studied, however, until now. In this new effort, the researchers sequenced several varieties of potato to learn more about how the modern European potato came to exist.Prior study had shown that the potatoes that first made their way to Europe came from somewhere in the Andes mountains, near the equator. Because of the difference in day length, this suggests that some adaptation must have occurred to allow the potato to survive in Europe. Also, potato plants that grow in the Andes are able to produce potatoes all year long, whereas in Europe, potatoes grow in the spring, summer and fall, and are harvested before winter. To learn more about the genetic adaptions the plants underwent, the researchers obtained 88 samples of modern potatoes and specimens saved during the years 1660 to 1896. All of the samples were then sequenced.The researchers found that the potatoes in Europe were originally nearly identical to those in the Andes. But over time, genetic changes crept in—a variant of the gene CDF1 appeared, for example, a change that allowed the potato to adapt to the European summer. Potatoes native to Chile have a similar adaptation, which quite naturally led to questions about whether potatoes from that region might have been imported. Further testing showed differences in the variants indicating that they developed independently.The researchers also found evidence of other changes that occurred to European potatoes in the mid-1800s. They suspect this occurred as farmers began breeding them with South American varieties to combat the blight that led to the potato famine. They also found signs of interbreeding during the 20th century as farmers once again tried to make their crops more resistant to diseases.last_img read more

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What Dropping 17000 Wallets Around The Globe Can Teach Us About Honesty

first_imgThe experiment started small, with a research assistant in Finland turning in a few wallets with different amounts of money. He would walk up to the counter of a big public place, like a bank or a post office. And would that answer be different if it was empty or full of cash? Those are questions researchers have been exploring; Thursday, they published their findings in the journal Science. So picture this: You’re a receptionist at, say, a hotel. Someone walks in and says they found a lost wallet but they’re in a hurry. They hand it to you. What would you do?center_img “Acting as a tourist, he mentioned that he found the wallet outside around the corner, and then he asked the employees to take care of it,” says Alain Cohn from the University of Michigan, the study’s lead author. The researchers assumed that putting money in the wallet would make people less likely to return it, because the payoff would be bigger. A poll of 279 “top-performing academic economists” agreed. Read the whole story: NPRlast_img read more

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