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Future scientists

first_imgSide-by-side with Georgia’s bestMullis and UGA plant pathology researcher Alex Csinos arementoring Connell and Wright in the Young Scholars Program of theUGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The annual program pairs students with CAES scientists insix-week summer internships on the UGA Athens, Griffin and Tiftoncampuses.”We wanted these two students to do something productive,” Mullissaid of the research project he and Csinos have guided. “I’vebeen extraordinarily impressed with their work. We may be lookingat getting their names on a refereed journal article.”Connell, a country boy, and Wright, a city girl, are studyingtomato spotted wilt virus. Specifically, they’re trying to findexactly how this devastating virus moves through tobacco plants.The scientists set up the experiment by screening 90 tobaccoplants for the virus. From those, they singled out 10 infectedand 10 noninfected plants.Twice a week since early June, Connell and Wright have been outin the tobacco field, observing symptoms and carefully samplingplant tissues throughout those plants to be analyzed in the lab.”I like this, but I don’t like the field work much,” said Wright,whose normal summer habitat is air-conditioned. “It’s a lotharder than I thought it would be.”But the work they’re doing may be groundbreaking. “They’ve runroughly 2,000 samples off those 20 plants so far,” Mullins said.”We’ve got a lot of good, hard data to analyze.” By Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaIt’s hard to imagine two less likely partners toiling in asteamy, south Georgia tobacco field than Summer Wright and ShaneConnell. The high school students’ studies, though, could catchscientists’ eyes worldwide.”This research has been done before, but not in this detail intobacco,” said Stephen Mullis, coordinator of the University ofGeorgia’s plant pathology virology lab in Tifton, Ga. More than 60 interns statewideThe Young Scholars Program has 14 students enrolled on the Tiftoncampus this summer, said Susan Reinhardt, YSP director in Tifton.Another 26 students are interning in Griffin, and 25 are inAthens.The interns are paid for up to 40 hours per week while workingside-by-side with UGA scientists. “The whole purpose is to getstudents involved in the science behind agriculture,” Reinhardtsaid.It’s working.”It’s different from what I expected,” said Wright, a junior thisfall at Tift County High. “I never thought of agriculture andscience together. I thought of agriculture as growing things andscience as high-tech work. But the two really go togetherhand-in-hand.”Wright was surprised at the work load in a science laboratory,too. “I pictured them sitting around a lot, but they don’t,” shesaid. “They really work.”Connell, a senior this fall at Berrien County High, feels rightat home in agriculture. “I’ve had a lot of ag classes,” he said.”And I live in south Georgia. Everything around me isagriculture. I’m naturally interested in it.”While Wright chose plant pathology because she knew the leastabout it, Connell was well acquainted with it, partly through hisFuture Farmers of America work. “I’ve been working on athree-year study on tomato spotted wilt virus,” he said.His experience hasn’t completely surprised him. “This is what Iexpected, for the most part,” he said. “But I’ve had a muchbroader look at how research is actually done, as opposed to thekind of science we do in the high school lab.”Like Wright, Connell is impressed by the volume of work in auniversity lab. “The most surprising thing,” he said, “has beenhow many samples run through this lab in a week. These guysreally have a lot to do.”Connell plans to attend Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College forcore classes and then UGA or the Medical College of Georgia.”I’d like to get into clinical pathology — people pathology,” hesaid. “But some of the basic principles of what we’re doing herewill apply in that field, too.”last_img read more

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Tornado time?

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgians may think of spring as the beginning of tornado season, but University of Georgia experts say tornadoes can occur almost year-round. “Statistically, the odds of a tornado hitting a particular point are like 1 in 5,000 or so,” she said. Tornadoes typically occur when “the humidity is high, the winds change with height and there’s sunshine,” she said. They most often form in front of a “push of energy” like a cold front.Too cold for twisters Tornado warnings may seem to last forever, but Knox says an average tornado lasts about 15 minutes. If you live in a state like Colorado, you may be able to see a tornado coming from 20 miles away, Knox said. Georgians, unfortunately, don’t have that luxury. Tornadoes are part of what Knox calls “a whole suite of things that can happen in a thunderstorm.” “Most meteorologists get hooked on weather at an early age,” she said. “I was hooked in the third grade when a tornado hit two blocks from our house in Michigan. It took the middle of a church and left the two ends standing.” “A weather radio is one of the best purchases you can make for your family’s safety during any weather emergency,” she said. Slim odds It can be too cold for a tornado, Knox said. Remembering such dates is part of Knox’s job as assistant to Georgia state climatologist David Stooksbury. It’s also part of her nature. “Tornadoes can happen any time of year, any time of day,” said Pam Knox, Georgia’s assistant state climatologist and a researcher with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “It’s true, spring to early summer seems to be the time of year we think about tornadoes. But Georgia has had them all year.” “Sometimes tornadoes are wrapped in rain so you don’t see them,” she said. “And we have lots of hills in the Southeast, so you can’t see tornadoes coming. That’s why most tornado photographs are taken in the plains of Oklahoma or Kansas.” You can’t see them coming “They won’t happen if the temperature’s 32 degrees or lower,” Knox said. “That said, there are also isolated tornadoes that happen outside these atmospheric conditions. Many form in the right front quadrant of a hurricane like before (Hurricane) Ivan in Georgia on Sept. 15-16, 2004.” Many tornado survivors liken the sound of a tornado to that of a moving freight train or a swarm of angry bees. But don’t rely on sound or sight during a tornado warning, Knox said. Instead, rely on weather reports from the National Weather Service. Don’t trust the movies Despite this experience, Knox isn’t scared of tornadoes, because she understands how they form. She also knows the math. Knox also warns people to remember that tornado movies are often more fictional than factual. The average tornado follows a well-defined path of about 10 miles and usually touches ground for just one mile. “Sometimes a tornado will skip along the ground, and sometimes it never hits the ground,” she said. “When that happens, it’s just a funnel cloud.” “The movie ‘Twister’ significantly increased the number of students majoring in meteorology,” she said. “Unfortunately, it wasn’t very true to life. It usually takes 10 tracking trips to see one tornado. We meteorologists have to suspend our scientific beliefs when we watch tornado movies.”last_img read more

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Banks at Risk in Loans to Coal Companies

first_imgBanks at Risk in Loans to Coal Companies FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Michael Slezak for The Guardian:An announcement today that ANZ is absorbing a bigger than expected loss as a result of lending to the mining industry is likely to be the tip of the iceberg as coal and other fossil fuels go into structural decline, according to some financial analysts.Related: Australian coalmines are one of riskiest investments in the world – reportANZ announced to the Australian stock exchange on Thursday that over the past month, conditions have changed such that expected costs associated with lending to the mining and resources sector would increase from a projected $800m to more than $900m .The bank said the change was caused by the “evolving position with a small number of Australian and multi-national resources-related exposures”.“While the overall credit environment remains broadly stable, we are continuing to see pockets of weakness associated with low commodity prices in the resources sector and in related industries,” said ANZ’s acting chief financial officer, Graham Hodges .The bank did not disclose which companies or loans caused the writedown, but Tim Buckley , a former Citibank analyst who is now with the anti-fossil fuel Institute for Energy Economics & Financial Analysis , said there were two new developments that could be linked to the move.The first was the warning by coal giant Peabody Energy that it was on the brink of bankruptcy after finding itself unable to pay an interest payment of US$70m .Buckley said if ANZ had lent to Peabody – which would not be known unless the company filed for bankruptcy – that would have put a dent the bank’s balance sheet.And on Wednesday the Australian Financial Review reported the owners of a coal export facility in Queensland, WICET, was struggling with its loans because of falling coal prices, and may be seeking a debt-for-equity swap, where the company exchanges debt for a pre-determined amount of equity or stock. A report in the AFR said ANZ was set to lose money on a loan associated with WICET’s coal export facility.Full article: ANZ’s bad loans to miners are just ‘tip of the iceberg’, analysts saylast_img read more

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PATENT Act approved 16-4 by Senate Judiciary

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The “Protecting American Talent and Entrepreneurship (PATENT) Act,” S. 1137, was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee in a 16-4 vote Thursday.Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and Ranking Member Patrick Leahy D-Vt., were joined by Sens. John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., in introducing the bipartisan legislation in April.NAFCU believes the legislation is a step in the right direction and that it will reduce the abusive behavior of sending vague and deceptive demand letters, but the association will continue to work toward improvements to the bill such as making permanent the Covered Business Method program.In advance of the hearing, NAFCU Vice President of Legislative Affairs Brad Thaler urged leaders of the committee to do further work to “enhance the language to curb deceptive demand letters, as well as work to ensure that meaningful opportunities exist for all sectors to challenge low-quality patents and have them reviewed by experts at the Patent and Trademark Office for validity.”NAFCU, with other financial trade organizations, has presented lawmakers with principles for patent reform to address the issue of demand letters and deceptive patent troll behavior. They include: continue reading »last_img read more

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Not all millennials are created equal

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Millennials are the largest generation in world history, numbering 80 million and commanding $1.3 trillion in direct annual spending in the U.S. alone. These consumers (where many define the oldest as 35 years old) represent a surprisingly diverse financial services segment, with varied needs and behaviors. This segment is more digitally focused than any previous generation, with connections to financial organizations reflecting their comfort with the App economy.To connect with this segment that has increasing financial clout, it is important for both traditional banking organizations and fintech start-ups to build digital experiences that are seamless, well-designed and integrated with this segment’s lifestyle. For a deeper look into how financial organizations can better serve the Millennial segment, Oracle surveyed more than 4,500 consumers across 9 markets – Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, UK and the U.S. in their report, “The Millennial Migration: How Banks Can Remain Relevant In Their Decision-Making Eco-System.”Millennial Segment DiversityOracle divided Millennials into four sub-segments: Young Millennials (aged 18-21), Middle Millennials (aged 22-25), Mature Millennials (aged 26-30), and Grey Millennials (aged 31-45 years old). These age-based segments provided better insights into the differences in use of and reliance on different financial services providers. continue reading »last_img read more

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Trump, Cordray each designate an acting CFPB director

first_imgSetting up a high-stakes legal and political battle, President Trump and CFPB Director Richard Cordray each designated an acting director for the agency following Cordray’s departure Friday.In a parting shot at the Trump Administration, Cordray announced he was resigning effective Friday and designated Leandra English as acting director of the agency – attempting to head off an effort by Trump to appoint an acting director himself. English is the agency’s chief-of-staff.But Trump then designated Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney to run the agency on an acting basis.By Friday evening, it was unclear who was in charge of the agency. 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Fewer trips, passengers and cruise days in the first seven months

first_imgIn the period from January to July 2017, the number of trips of foreign cruise ships decreased by 15,2%, and the number of passengers on these ships decreased by 13,1% compared to the same period in 2016. The total number of days spent by ships in the same period is lower by 19%, according to data from the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS).63 foreign cruise ships sailed into seaports In the period from January to July 2017, 63 foreign cruise ships entered Croatian seaports, which made 335 cruises. There were 467 thousand passengers on these ships, who stayed in Croatia for 737 days.The largest number of voyages was made by ships under the flag of the Bahamas (81 voyages) and Malta (79 voyages), while the largest number of passengers arrived by ships under the flag of Italy (118 thousand passengers) and the Bahamas (105 thousand passengers). Out of a total of 335 trips, most trips were realized in the Dubrovnik-Neretva County (65,4%) and the Split-Dalmatia County (15,8%), which is a total of 81,2%. The remaining 18,8% of trips were made in the following counties: Zadar (6,8%), Istria (5,4%), Šibenik-Knin (3,6%), Primorje-Gorski Kotar (2,7%) and Lika-Croatia. Senj (0,3%). The port of Dubrovnik is the most visited seaport The port of Dubrovnik had the highest number of visits by foreign cruise ships (267 visits), followed by the ports of Split (107 visits) and Korčula (69 visits).Source: CBSlast_img read more

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This couple stepped over the road to find their perfect family home, but the time has come to move on

first_imgCarol and Peter Iliffe are auctioning their family home at Highgate Hill after 17 years. Photo: Annette DewCarol and Peter Iliffe found a clever way to keep moving costs down when they bought 37 Prospect Terrace, Highgate Hill, 17 years ago — simply shift 30 metres from your current home.“We rented a house across the road and the lady who lived here became a friend,” Mrs Iliffe said.“When the owners wanted to sell, she didn’t want to buy it so we negotiated, bought it and moved.”The couple have raised three children in the five-bedroom home, but after almost two decades of love and laughter, the time to downsize was upon them.“The kids loved it here — the closeness of the city and the freedom it gave them,” Mrs Iliffe said. “Of course they’d often bring home lots of friends from State High (school) for a swim because it’s so close.”She said despite being moments from the CBD, their location had proved surprisingly quiet.“You really wouldn’t think you’re this close to the city even though you’re only a few streets back from South Bank,” she said.The Iliffes renovated the home in 2006 so, as the children grew up, the family could spread out and enjoy the space.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus1 day agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market1 day ago“We basically split the two levels so they could have their friends over and not impact on our area too much,” Mrs Iliffe said.When she and Mr Iliffe wanted to relax away from the kids, they enjoyed their great outdoors.“The back deck — we’ve got big mango trees around there and a retractable awning so you can still look up at the stars,” she said.The couple are keen to downsize but haven’t decided on their next move, so they’re set to rent for six months.“It’s going to be hard, but it’s time for us to have a change,” Mrs Iliffe said.The house at 37 Prospect Terrace, Highgate Hill, is being auctioned Saturday October 28 at midday by Will Bertelsen of Ray White Brisbane CBD.Follow Kieran Clair on Twitter at @kieranclair undefinedlast_img read more

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Norwegian oil fund says effects of stock exchange fragmentation ‘worrying’

first_imgThe manager of Norway’s sovereign wealth fund, the Government Pension Fund Global (GPFG), says the fragmentation and increased competition in the stock exchange sector has led to “worrying developments”, and that exchanges must adapt to new circumstances.In a research note on the role of exchanges in well-functioning markets, Norges Bank Investment Management (NBIM), which manages the NOK7.2trn (€793bn) fund, said it wanted exchanges to consider changes, such as a return to local exchanges.NBIM said: “We view exchanges as critical to well-functioning markets, both in their function as listing venues, and as the final arbiter of the price discovery process. “However, if they are to re-assert their central role, they must adapt and innovate to enhance their attractiveness to institutional investors who have supplanted the many small retail investors that exchanges were originally designed to serve,” it said. Its main concerns were that stiffer competition between exchanges and alternative trading systems could lead to poorer regulation and governance and that the efforts by exchanges and dealers to keep up with the speed race could end up harming all market participants.“For-profit exchanges are now challenged to maintain their regulatory and corporate governance duties in this competitive landscape,” it said.As an example of how the push to increase speed of communications could be detrimental, NBIM cited the current speed race amongst providers of network infrastructure, so-called microwave data-link providers.These providers were able to earn increasingly “super-normal” profits, it believed, to the detriment of all financial market participants. “We support efforts to remove complexity that leads to this form of over-investment,” the manager said.”We view the current latency race as ultimately a dead-end,” it said.Efforts by exchanges to increase availability of liquidity in size would be welcome, it said.“Supporting the development of batch auctions and experimenting with size versus time priority models are all initiatives in the right direction, in our view,” it said.NBIM also said it was worried about the fall in the number of listings in the US and Europe in recent years.“We do not believe economies benefit when going public simply means cashing in, rather than raising capital,” it said.It added: “We encourage exchanges to develop new solutions in this area, be they in the form of new listing classes, or potentially even a return to local exchanges.”,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to NBIM research notelast_img read more

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Man accused of Laurel murder pleads not guilty

first_imgBROOKVILLE, Ind. — A Laurel man accused of murder recently appeared before a judge and pleaded not guilty.Bertram Rayburn Jr., 61,  is facing murder and criminal recklessness charges in connection to the death of Dwight Jones, 59, of Laurel.Franklin County deputies found Jones inside of a pickup truck suffering from a gunshot wound in the early morning hours of Tuesday, November 4. He was later flown to an Indianapolis hospital and was pronounced dead on November 5.Court documents obtained by the Brookville American-Democrat reveal it may have been a night of partying gone wrong as the victim, alleged shooters, and others were up all night drinking and possibly arguing.If convicted, Rayburn could serve up to six decades in prison.last_img

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