Category: opoqiamqf

Watch Full Video Of The Disco Biscuits’ Debut In Coney Island [Pro-Shot/Gallery]

first_imgLast night marked the end of City Bisco, a three night run that took The Disco Biscuits throughout the New York metropolitan area with two nights at the intimate Irving Plaza, and a third and final night at the newly built Coney Island Amphitheatre, bringing fans to Brooklyn, NY for a beautiful change in scenery.Full Video: The Disco Biscuits Debut New Song In Raging NYC ShowThe band entered last night’s stage with the Hungry March Band for a “Spectacle” opener, after the young band members had kept the amphitheater entertained long before the Disco Biscuits hit the stage. Once acquainted, the band dug right into a lengthy first set, with “Tempest” and an inverted “Digital Buddha” sandwiched between “The Very Moon”.After a break, the band returned to the stage for a cover of the Beastie Boys‘ “No Sleep Till Brooklyn”, a natural fit for the three-night occasion, before dialing into their raging second set, with Pink Floyd’s “Run Like Hell”, “Cyclone” and inverted versions of “Crickets” and “Aquatic Ape” to keep the crowd moving. The night closed on a “Highwire” dance party, as the three-night run came to its close. Watch last night’s Disco Biscuits show below.With a few days off, the band will return to the stage in Hampton, GA for the Imagine Festival next week, and then two nights of The Great North in Maine in September, before heading over to the Brooklyn Bowl in Las Vegas for their three-night Halloween run.Setlist: The Disco Biscuits At Ford Amphitheater at Coney Island Boardwalk, Brooklyn, NY – 8/20/16I: Spectacle (with Hungry March Band)-> ¿Donde?, The Very Moon-> Tempest-> Digital Buddha (inverted)->The Very Moon-> And the Ladies Were the Rest of the Night (ending)II: No Sleep Til Brooklyn (Beastie Boys)-> Run Like Hell-> Cyclone-> Crickets (inverted)-> Aquatic Ape (inverted)-> Bernstein & Chasnoff (ending)E: HighwirePhotos via T-Rex Photo; see the full gallery below. Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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A chameleon in the physics lab

first_img Read Full Story Active camouflage has taken a step forward at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), with a new coating that intrinsically conceals its own temperature to thermal cameras.In a laboratory test, a team of applied physicists placed the device on a hot plate and watched it through an infrared camera as the temperature rose. Initially, it behaved as expected, giving off more infrared light as the sample was heated: at 60 degrees Celsius it appeared blue-green to the camera; by 70 degrees it was red and yellow. At 74 degrees it turned a deep red — and then something strange happened. The thermal radiation plummeted. At 80 degrees it looked blue, as if it could be 60 degrees, and at 85 it looked even colder. Moreover, the effect was reversible and repeatable, many times over.These surprising results, published today in the journal Physical Review X (an open-access publication of the American Physical Society), illustrate the potential for a new class of engineered materials to contribute to a range of new military and everyday applications.last_img read more

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Sorin Fellows program aims to aid in student formation

first_imgSince its founding by the de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture (dCEC) in 2014, the Sorin Fellows Program has expanded programming and grown in size. The program, established in conjunction with the bicentennial anniversary of Fr. Sorin’s birth, was created as a student formation program within the dCEC and shares the center’s dedication to exploring and sharing the richness of the Catholic moral and intellectual tradition.“The program was started by the center to create a space for students to have an outlet for the integration and cultivation of their social, intellectual, spiritual and professional development as inspired by the Catholic moral and intellectual tradition,” student program director Pete Hlabse said in an email.However, Hlabse emphasized that the program is not exclusively for Catholics — anyone, of any faith, is welcome to apply. Photo courtesy of Maggie Garnett A group of Sorin Fellows students pose during a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in Israel during spring break this year.“We’re inspired by the Catholic identity of our University and center,” Hlabse said. “An important expression of that is not only engagement but friendship with anyone who thinks that the ideas of human dignity, authentic human freedom and the common good are important and relevant to grapple with.”Hlabse came into his role as director in October of 2017 when the dCEC created a new position to specifically oversee the program.“The program has grown substantially since I began working with the Center — primarily because there is now a staff member exclusively dedicated to student formation programming,” Hlabse said.Junior Michael Kurkowski, who became a Sorin Fellow during his freshman year, has witnessed this expansion of the program.“During my freshman year — even though that was only two years ago — I liked the things that they offered, but I don’t think it was as expansive as it is now,” Kurkowski said. “I really liked what they had to offer, and I really like how they’ve expanded and what they’ve offered since then.”One popular Sorin Fellows program is the Sorin Supper Club — a series of dinners in which a Notre Dame faculty member has a small group of students over to his or her house for dinner. There is no formal plan for the events — students and faculty simply share a meal and conversation.“It’s really nice to step off campus,” Kurkowski said. “I come from a big family, so it was nice to go to a professor’s house who also has a big family. I sort of felt like I was going back home for a little bit. It was nice to just sit back and relax and talk to them in that informal setting.”The Sorin Fellows Program offers a variety of events and opportunities to its members, including opportunities for grants and funding.“Some of our events are socially oriented, some of them are more intellectually oriented, some of them are more spiritually oriented and some of them are more directed towards professional development,” Hlabse said.A more recently established event that the program offers is, “The Book That Changed My Life” lecture series. The series was founded in response to student feedback.“Over time, it became clear that students were interested in engaging with faculty members beyond their interface with them in the classroom,” Hlabse said.The series features Notre Dame faculty members who speak about how a book they read has challenged and changed them.“Right now, it’s exclusive to Sorin Fellows, but next year I want to open it up to the entire campus community because I think this is a kind of interface that students want,” Hlabse said.Freshman Sorin fellow Maggie Garnett said one of her favorite events is a weekly female discussion group called Vocation to Love. The group does a reading and then meets to discuss it at the house of Suzy Younger, a fertility care practitioner in South Bend who is affiliated with the dCEC.“It’s a chance to sort of get out of the campus environment, and stepping out of the stress of classes and assignments and expectations of campus has been really important to me,” Garnett said.Besides opportunities for participating in events, the Sorin Fellows Program also offers its members a community in which strong relationships are fostered, Garnett said.“It does sort of give that extra community outside of dorm life or classes or clubs,” Garnett said. “It’s like that additional circle that sort of grounds you in a place at this University. It’s been very much like a home for me, which I’ve been very grateful for.”Applications to the program are accepted on rolling basis, and the program is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Currently, there are 225 undergraduate fellows and 60 graduate fellows, Hlabse said.“The program really is what you make of it,” Garnett said. “If you want it to be your primary community and your primary extra-curricular, it can be. If it’s something that you come to from time to time, that’s also totally fine. There’s no minimum requirements, there’s no minimum GPA, there’s rolling applications, so there’s no point where you can’t apply — even if you’re a senior.”Hlabse said he hopes the Sorin Fellows Program helps shape students into thoughtful people who will further Fr. Sorin’s vision for Notre Dame to be a force for good in the world.“If graduating Sorin Fellows are committed to the idea that we don’t flourish as individuals, but as communities committed to the good, true and beautiful, then in a small way, the Sorin Fellows Program will have served a purpose,” he said.Tags: de nicola center for ethics and culture, sorin fellows, student formationlast_img read more

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Boyle, McGuire reflect on ‘unpredictable’ year in office

first_imgAs the academic year began with the elimination of campus-wide dorm access and culminated in a global health crisis, senior Elizabeth Boyle and junior Patrick McGuire led the student body through unprecedented changes, victories and losses as student body president and vice president, respectively.Despite the challenges they faced and the controversies that took place during their term, both Boyle and McGuire expressed deep gratitude for their experience.“I wanted to go to Notre Dame like my whole life, basically, and I never thought I’d be able to graduate and say that I had the honor the student body president,” Boyle said. “I just felt like I got to know the school in such a more genuine and unique way this year and I’m really grateful to all the students who let [McGuire] and I do that and who entrusted us to do it.”After a year in office, Boyle and McGuire reflected on their time as leaders, the challenges they faced, and the lessons they learned throughout their time in office.Inclusivity at workWhen Boyle and McGrath decided to run for office, they had a mission of empowering students of all different backgrounds, Boyle said.“Everyone’s Notre Dame experience actually looks vastly different,” Boyle said. “I think sometimes we come in and you’re expected to fall in love with your dorm, have to double major, graduate in four years, go abroad, have a research position –– and we learned that everyone’s path can look vastly different. So we focused on how we could best serve as a vessel to support students in all of their myriad interests and to make them feel welcome no matter their background.”To achieve this goal, Boyle and McGuire strived to foster inclusivity within cabinets and departments, and “welcome all voices” into the dialogue.“I just felt like student government was so different,” Boyle said. “It finally became a place that was so much more open to students, really made an effort to reach out and wasn’t as insular as it was before. We made it a place where it wasn’t scary to walk into the office, and you didn’t feel like you had to have been there and had to be a part of the friend group to be heard and be involved.”Both Boyle and McGuire counted this change of environment as one of their greatest achievements.“We’re so proud of have our team for the spirit of inclusion and welcome that they really foster this year,” Boyle said. “I think when you have people at the very top who are buying into that, who are going to be filled with grace, and patience and love, and are not going to take rash actions that are going to think things through that are pouring their full heart and soul into this work and inspires those below them to kind of do the same.”An ‘unpredictable’ and ‘tiring’ year When asked to describe the year in one word, Boyle said the year was “unpredictable” while McGuire described it as “tiring.”“Right before we took office, our advisor’s were like ‘Cool, cool, this was your platform, but everything you thought was going to be the focus of the year is like, going out the window,’” McGuire said. “That’s just the nature of things, like what you expected is never going to be what happens.”Such unpredictability was especially present during the spring semester because of the pandemic.“It was difficult because when everything seemed to really be falling apart, everyone was still on spring break all around the world,” Boyle said. “So it was hard to coordinate efforts and …  kind of react to it until everybody got back after spring break.”Notre Dame’s traditional culture sometimes made it difficult to enact changes, McGuire said.“It can be really hard to get stuff done at Notre Dame in terms of things that make learning great, like its culture and its cohesiveness,” McGuire said. “I think it can also make things difficult at times –– that applies even to the structure of the student union or the Constitution.”Despite the trying times they faced, Boyle and McGuire emerged with plenty of lessons. Boyle said serving as student body president taught her about leadership.“Being a leader, I think means knowing that even when those times are going to be tougher, the unpredictable things are going to come up, it’s kind of on you to carry your team through it and to do it with grace and love,” Boyle said. “So I’ll keep working on that for sure. But I’m really proud of the way that we all did that this year.”McGuire said his greatest takeaway from his time as vice president was the importance of assuming there are good intentions behind leaders’ actions.“My biggest lesson is the importance of assuming goodwill and the importance of relationships, because like, whether it’s an administrator or a student leader, no one pours themselves into a role like this if they don’t really care about what they’re doing, the people they’re serving,” McGuire said.Looking towards the futureBecause of the transition to a virtual semester, Boyle and McGuire were unable to see some of their projects come into fruition, like the Back the Bend 2020 –– the day of service in South Bend that was going to be held in April 25 –– and “Civics in Action” –– a dialogue group aiming to foster civic engagement in advance of the presidential debates. However, according to Boyle, the incoming Ingal-Galbenski administration might pick up these initiatives during their term.“I take a lot of comfort in the fact that they’re going to do a wonderful job and that I think they got a good foundation to start with,” Boyle said.In regards to the future, Boyle and McGuire said they hoped some of the positive changes they accomplished carry on in the next years, especially the improved relationship between student government and the administration.“I am really proud of the way that our entire team has worked with the administration this year because our team has been so vigilant of telling the administration that they have to include student voices. And I’ve been really impressed that they’ve listened to those complaints from students. It seems like they are moving in a direction of being better about that,” Boyle said.McGuire mentioned a change he hopes to see in the future: either paying or giving credit to student leaders. He believes this policy would allow marginalized students to participate in student government.“Elizabeth and I are in a privileged enough position that we can devote 20 to 30 hours a week to student government, we can afford not to support our families or have a job on the side. But that cuts out a lot of students,” McGuire said. “Student officers are doing it because they care, not because they’re getting paid for it. While it’s something that shows commitment, it does cut people out.”After reflecting upon tumultuous times, changes and unpredictability, Boyle and McGuire’s wish is to have made a positive mark at Notre Dame.“I hope when we’re all older and gray and thinking back on the 2019-2020 Student Government administration, you probably won’t remember what we did,” McGuire said. “I might not even remember what we did. But I just hope that people think we cared and we tried to make Notre Dame more inclusive and a more loving place.”Tags: commencement 2020, Elizabeth Boyle, Patrick McGuire, Student governmentlast_img read more

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Douglas to announce Williston and Colchester housing grants of $400,000

first_imgGovernor Jim Douglas to announce $360,010 Community Development Block Grant to the Town of Williston and $49,795 grant to the Town of Colchester to assist in the development of affordable housing. Tuesday, March 17, 2009 4 pm. Williston Town Hall meeting room. ###last_img

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India reports new H5N1 outbreak

first_imgDec 1, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Government officials in India recently confirmed an H5N1 avian influenza outbreak in the northeastern state of Assam, according to a Nov 28 report from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).The virus struck backyard poultry in a small village, killing 324 of 391 birds, according to the OIE report. Testing on samples from the birds was conducted at the High Security Animal Disease Laboratory in Bhopal, which reported the positive H5N1 findings on Nov 27.India’s last H5N1 outbreak occurred in May, when the virus struck backyard poultry in West Bengal state. That outbreak signaled the end of a 5-month battle against the virus at several sites in West Bengal and Tripura states, both of which adjoin Bangladesh. On Nov 4 India filed a final report on the 42 outbreaks in those two northeastern states.In Assam, officials ordered the culling of all domestic poultry within a 5-km radius of the outbreak site and said owners would be compensated for their birds. The OIE report said authorities have closed poultry markets and curbed the sale and transport of birds in the zone near the outbreak.Manoranjan Choudhury, deputy director of Assam’s veterinary department, said that animal health workers have culled 40,000 of 60,000 poultry that were slated for culling, according to a report today from the Times of India. He said chickens and ducks are affected by the slaughtering activities, which will involve 48 villages. Twenty-two rapid response teams are expected to complete the operations within the next 2 or 3 days, Choudhury told the Times.Officials are investigating the outbreak and have not determined the source, the OIE report said.Despite several poultry outbreaks, India has never reported a human H5N1 case.See also:Nov 28 OIE reporthttp://web.oie.int/wahis/reports/en_imm_0000007566_20081128_154658.pdflast_img read more

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Brisbane home has it’s own private lake

first_img79 Camelot Pl, Bridgeman Downs, has its own lake crowned with a wooden bridge.Picture it. It’s a lazy Sunday morning on what is set to be another hot summer’s day. You’re stretched out by the pool catching up on the day’s news, when the sound of laughter draws your attention to the nearby lake. You see your children jump in a boat and row themselves across the water, setting off on their next big adventure.It sounds like a memory formed on an unforgettable family holiday, right? The house sits beside its own private lake in a tightly held street in Bridgeman Downs.Yet for Mick Foley and his two daughters aged 13 and 12, it is a scene they could recreate every weekend. The family have owned 79 Camelot Place, a sprawling house with six bedrooms in a tightly held street in Bridgeman Downs for the past four years. The property stretches to more than two acres and is made up of the house, manicured gardens, trees and lawns, where Mr Foley, who owns two helicopter charter companies, among other businesses, is able to land his personal chopper. The house has mulitple living spaces.Helicopters aside, the property’s biggest attraction has to be its picturesque lake, crowned with an arched wooden footbridge.Mr Foley said the family had spent a lot of time on the lake over the years and he would miss it greatly. The kitchen is the heart of the home.“It’s a very quiet spot, and there’s the fountain and lights on it at night, and the fire pit on the other side where I used to sit with the girls. It’s a special place,” Mr Foley.While the sheer enormity of the house may appear overwhelming, Mr Foley said that once you start living in it, you grow into the space and the floor plan has allowed the home to retain a sense of cosiness. There are plenty of places fro which to take in the lake views.“When you walk into it, it feels like a normal home, which is what attracted me to it in the first place. It’s northeast facing, perfectly positioned on the block, it just ticked all the boxes for me.”Three of the home’s six bedrooms reside on the upper level of the three-storey house, including the main which has an ensuite and walk-in robe. From this level you can capture stunning views of the lake.The remaining three bedrooms can be found on the middle storey, where again, you are hit with lake views. The bedrooms are generous in size.All the living areas, including the chef’s kitchen with stone bench tops, which Mr Foley said was the heart of the home, are on the lower level.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus8 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market8 hours agoAn informal eating area and family room adjacent to the kitchen has floor to ceiling glass walls to maximise on the lake views and natural light. Both these areas open out to an outdoor entertaining pavilion and deck, framed with balustrading for lakeside dining and The house has a cinema room.entertaining. Descend a set of stairs and follow a meandering path to the infinity edge pool, set on the edge of the lake. There is also a free-standing pavilion, for hosting parties, family and friends.Built in the late 1990s, the only thing that belies this home’s age is the terracotta tiling throughout, which Mr Foley admits to having become too busy to replace. Elsewhere, the house is timeless in its design and architecture. The house suits alarge family who want room to move.Unfortunately Mr Foley said that with the family’s schedule becoming far more busy, he felt the property wasn’t being used to its full potential and so made the difficult decision toput it on the market.“I think it suits a large family with early age kids that want the space, and I hope someone enjoys it as much as our family has. It really is a house in which memories can be made.”And who doesn’t want that?The property will be auctioned on Saturday, August 29 at 11am.last_img read more

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Sizing team to make late call

first_img The 2011 Champion Chase hero brought the house down on his first start of the campaign when winning the PWC Champion Chase at Gowran Park for a fourth time, beating leading Gold Cup contender Road To Riches, but has not been seen since disappointing in the Clonmel Oil Chase in November. De Bromhead said: “We haven’t decided whether Europe will go or not yet. It will be a late one (decision). We’ll see how he is and what the ground is like and so on.” Henry de Bromhead is no nearer to deciding whether to let Sizing Europe return to Cheltenham for another tilt at the Queen Mother Champion Chase. Press Associationcenter_img The County Waterford-based trainer looks set to send a small but select team of horses across the water next week. Sizing John, not sighted since winning the Future Champions Novice Hurdle at Leopardstown over Christmas, is one such horse as he gears up for a tilt at the Supreme. “Sizing John is in good form and he’ll go for the Supreme Novices’ Hurdle,” said De Bromhead. “Smashing will run in the Arkle, Grand Jesture goes for the three-mile handicap (Ultima Business Solutions Handicap Chase) and Bishops Road will run in the novice handicap (CHAPS Restaurant Barbados Novices’ Handicap Chase). That’s the team for the first day. “Special Tiara will go for the Champion Chase on the second day and Supasundae will run in the Champion Bumper. “That’s about as far as we’ve got at the moment.” Supasundae is a particularly intriguing contender, having won a Listed bumper at Ascot for Andrew Balding before being snapped up by De Bromhead’s main patrons, Alan and Ann Potts. “He seems a nice horse, so we’re looking forward to him,” said the trainer. last_img read more

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Bentley remembered as Heroic, Iconic

first_imgFORMER National Cyclist, Jude Bentley, was remembered as iconic and heroic at a moving funeral service on Sunday at World Vision New Testament Church of God in David Street, Kitty.The service, which saw several moving tributes to his professional, personal and sporting life, left little a dry eye.The former National cyclist, who was struck down by former chief-of-staff of the Guyana Defence Force, Gary Best, Saturday last, was laid to rest a week later.President of the Guyana Cycling Federation, Linden Dowridge, in an invited comment, stated that the sport has lost an icon in Bentley.A cyclist bursts into tears at the spot where Jude Bentley lost his life.He said the sport must seek to carry on the legacy left by Bentley.  The owner of Bentley’s cycle shop on Robb Street was remembered as a man who helped many in large and small ways and touched the lives of many of the current cyclists.Some recounted stories where Bentley gifted several young cyclists gear to compete in races around the country, often times offering them at payment plans with little or no interest.MOU for cyclingFollowing the cyclist’s death, The National Sport Commission (NSC) and the National Parks Commission (NPC) and the Guyana Cycling Federation (GCF) signed a Memorandum of Understanding.The MoU, according to the media, was drafted to allow for the country’s cyclists to utilise the inner circuit of the National Park for training in the evenings.The director of sport, Christopher Jones, was quoted as saying that the MoU seeks to provide support to the cycling community, those who use the park.Proper signage and other manner of warnings will be erected around the park to allow for patrons who also use the park, to be alerted.The document will be in memory of Bentleylast_img read more

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‘I’m sorry’ apparently not enough for some

first_img“I am sorry.”From the first time you pull a girl’s hair, trap your sister in a closet with a spider or hit your friend in the back with a plastic baseball bat (my bad, Jeff), parents everywhere teach that those three words are the magic solution to set everything right again.It is humiliating to admit you have done something wrong, and most of the time we would rather blame extenuating circumstances — let’s call this the “Bud Selig” defense — rather than admit our mistake. But when you finally are able to suck it up, ignore the feeling of doom in your gut and apologize, we are taught the slate is wiped clean.It is an extreme feeling of relief to admit a mistake and simply move on.Unless, of course, your apology concerns the ever-important world monopolized by ESPN. Then the apology becomes a matter of national concern.How sincere was it? Did emotion show on the athlete’s face? Did the apology come too late? And most importantly, should we accept this admission of guilt or forever begrudge the athlete that dare besmirch our team with his foibles?To be clear, this is not a column about Tiger Woods and whatever he was coerced into saying last Friday. I am following the path the wise men at The Golf Writers Association of America laid out and completely ignoring an irrelevant event. Woods didn’t commit a crime, he didn’t cheat — at golf, anyway — and the only explanation he owes is to his family.No, this column is about senior leader and leading scorer for the Wisconsin basketball team, Trevon Hughes.In case you have broken down mentally from the first batch of midterms, last Thursday the Badgers suffered a 68-52 defeat to border rival Minnesota. In postgame interviews Hughes — completely unsolicited — took the blame for the loss on himself, saying he set a poor example in practice the previous week.“It was all my fault,” Hughes said, also adding he had a “crappy week” in practice. “I was being a goofball in practice all week.”After reporters around Hughes paused in stunned silence, one followed up asking Hughes to clarify what he meant by a “crappy week.”“That’s unacceptable; I’m going to step up my leadership,” Hughes continued. “I wasn’t being a leader; I was just thinking everything was a joke. I was turning the ball over in practice, and it showed up in the game. I’ve just got to be more aggressive and be a better leader.”Walking back up to the media room, I immediately noted to Herald Sports Editor Jordan Schelling how impressive Hughes’ maturity was and how this growth in character was noticeable from his junior year to his senior season.Even more compelling, Hughes finished the game leading the Badgers in scoring with 19 points and shot a respectable 7-of-17 from the field, including 5-of-12 from 3-point range.He may have had a bad week of practice, but it didn’t throw his game off too much.From the reactions I received back in Madison, my opinion is in a small minority.Herald sports editors Adam Holt and Max Henson both expressed to me how “disappointed” they were with Hughes goofing around in practice during the middle of a Big Ten title race. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Badger beat writer Jeff Potrykus wrote on JSOnline’s Badger Blog, “But let’s be honest and blunt. UW fans better hope they don’t hear Hughes making similar comments after any more games this season.”(Stepping onto my soapbox.)At what point did “I am sorry” stop being enough?Hughes is a college kid who made the mistake of having too much fun during basketball practice. While that should be viewed as a minor problem at best, Hughes took responsibility and deflected all the blame to himself after a tough loss. What part of this makes him a poor leader?Let he whose assist-to-turnover ratio remains perfect cast the first stone at this man who dares slander James Naismith’s creation.(Falling off soap box.)Have we become such jackasses — no offense, Adam or Max — that an honest, upfront apology is no longer good enough?And perhaps more importantly, what happens if Hughes reads or hears the responses to his admission? Think about it. Athletes already come coated in a Teflon clich? coating — just read anything Jason Bohannon or Keaton Nankivil say.But can we really blame them, if this is the reaction when they expose themselves?As an athlete, why bother admitting fault to any mistake anymore?It is a sad day for sports society when honesty spurns only more scorn. It is an even sadder day when “I am sorry” doesn’t make things all better.So, Trevon, I’m not sure you have anything to apologize for, but to me at least, it’s all good.Michael is a senior majoring in journalism. Think he needs to stop preaching and write about better topics? Was this too whiny for you? It feels wrong for him to lecture anyone. Email him your thoughts at mbleach@badgerherald.com.last_img read more

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