Category: sqzlaaznu

Child arrested for alleged “copycat” shooting threats against Bayonne

first_img× BAYONNE – Threatening Twitter posts made Tuesday morning were found to be in imitation of another Twitter account that threatened mass shootings at Bayonne schools over the weekend and caused citywide school closures on Monday, March 5.A 13-year old Bayonne resident was charged with false public alarm on Tuesday night for allegedly posting the “copycat” threats on Twitter, according to police. The identity of the imitated accountholder remains under investigation.The 13-year-old allegedly opened a Twitter account on Tuesday morning before school was in session and allegedly used the same user name, Ispakagan Morenalaz, as the still-unidentified accountholder who made similar threats. Both accounts have been deactivated.“We’re looking into his motivation into why he did this,” said Bayonne Police Chief Drew Sisk. “That’s still unfolding.”On Facebook, Mayor James Davis said, “Rest assured that the BPD, in conjunction with other law enforcement agencies, will continue to work diligently to identify and hold accountable those responsible for the other threats. I will continue to provide updates as they become available.”last_img read more

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Gov. Whitmer concerned that Michigan protesters could cause longer stay-home duration

first_img WhatsApp WhatsApp Google+ Facebook CoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Pinterest Twitter Facebook Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer delivers her State of the State address to a joint session of the House and Senate, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, at the state Capitol in Lansing, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis) Governor Gretchen Whitmer says she’s concerned that protests “make it likelier” that Michiganders will have to stay home longer.On Wednesday the embattled governor told the hosts of “The View” that the president’s insistence that she reopen Michigan and make a deal with legislators is pouring fuel on the fire of unrest in the state.Whitmer said the protests will likely bring about a longer stay-home posture, exactly what the protesters are trying to avoid.She also added that the protests appear to her to be more of political rallies, featuring Confederate flags, Nazi symbolism, and calls for violence. Another protest is planned for Thursday. Pinterest Twitter Google+ Gov. Whitmer concerned that Michigan protesters could cause longer stay-home duration By Tommie Lee – May 13, 2020 4 561 Previous articleJeremiah Ware sentenced to 30 years in shootingNext articleInfant dies after being found unresponsive in a South Bend hotel room Tommie Leelast_img read more

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News story: Winners announced for new student apps

first_imgThe two contracts have been awarded to the winners of the Open Data Competition, which was launched via Innovate UK’s Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI) for companies to develop digital tools that allow prospective students to access and compare earnings and employment outcomes from different degrees.AccessEd is a social enterprise and will develop their ThinkUni app, offering students a ‘personalised careers assistant’ by bringing together cutting-edge data on universities, courses and financial outcomes in a tailored and accessible way.The Profs is an award-winning tuition company and will develop its digital tool, The Way Up, offering prospective students the chance to simulate a range of different graduate career paths through an innovative game.Following the launch of the competition in June in tandem with the Open Data Institute and ODI Leeds, five finalists unveiled their prototypes at a showcase event at Imperial College on 1 November, and tested the digital tools with prospective students. AccessEd and The Profs will launch a public beta for prospective students to start using by the end of March 2019.Research published by the government in June 2018 showed that what students study and the institution they choose really matters to their future life chances. In many other areas of life, from utility bills to hospital care, technology has put better information at our fingertips.The competition is part of a wider revolution in transparency in higher education data, with the government already having published a wide range of data on likely earnings, employability, and teaching quality at universities. For young people choosing the best university and course for them is a life-changing decision – and we want to make sure they get it right. Going to university can provide a wealth of opportunities and benefits for graduates, but we know that what you study and where you study really matters, so students need to see all of that information to get value for money. These new digital tools will help to give power back to students and transform their choices, so that no matter their background they can choose the right course for them that will help them to succeed in their future careers. Hundreds of thousands of students will benefit from two new digital tools that will help them make the best choice about what and where to study at university, as winners of the £300,000 government competition were unveiled today (19 December).Universities Minister Chris Skidmore announced the two winning tech companies, who will create mobile apps to level the playing field for all students, by giving them access to graduate outcomes data at their fingertips.Two contracts worth £150,000 each have been awarded to AccessEd, which offers students a ‘personalised careers assistant’, and The Profs who will create a game format for players to understand the consequences of their decisions through simulations of graduate career paths.Last month the Department for Education published landmark research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies, showing the vast majority of graduates earn more at 29 than those who did not go to university, but there are cases where students are not receiving the best returns from their course.The new digital tools are one part of the department’s drive to revolutionise student choice, particularly for the most disadvantaged students, who often may not receive help or encouragement on their university choice.Universities Minister Chris Skidmore said:last_img read more

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Accidental discharge of firearm kills teenager

first_imgNEW SHARON – A Mt. Blue High School student was killed Monday as a result of a self-inflicted, accidental discharge of a firearm, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office said Wednesday.Sheriff Scott Nichols said that Lt. David St. Laurent and Detective Ken Charles responded to a report of an unattended death at a residence on the Industry Road in New Sharon at approximately 2:55 p.m. Monday afternoon. The investigation revealed that the teenager, a student at Mt. Blue, had been video chatting with a friend when the accidental discharge of the firearm took place.“The event is reportedly not considered suspicious, but the result of a horrific accident,” Nichols said via email Wednesday. “There are no pending charges.”Support will be available through Mt. Blue High School for students, staff and parents. Superintendent Tina Meserve said all parents and staff have been invited to join a Zoom meeting both today and tomorrow; in addition, school counselors will be available until 2 p.m. today and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow. Masks and social distancing are required.In addition to FCSO personnel, New Sharon first responders and NorthStar EMS assisted at the scene. Maine State Police, the State Medical Examiner’s Office and the District Attorney’s Office were also notified.Nichols said that he and his staff expressed their sincere condolences to the family.last_img read more

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Hot fun in the wintertime

first_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. What would it take to make your winter more interesting? A stage full of singing, dancing mean girls? A flashback to a golden era of Japanese art? Or maybe a visit by a forefather of electronic music? All this and more are happening on the arts scene in the winter months.THEATERIt’s an oft-forgotten bit of Boston history that Malcolm Little lived here as a young man, where, on his way to recreating himself as Malcolm X, he was known in Roxbury as “Detroit Red.” The celebrated writer/actor/rapper Will Power tells this story in “Detroit Red,” a new piece that combines the historical record with hip-hop lyricism. Power has explained, “I was interested in this young man who was kind of wayward, kind of a gangster, and kind of confused, and yet went on to become Malcolm X. What allowed him, pushed him to be that, when other people don’t?” The Broadway-bound play has its world premiere at Emerson’s Paramount Center Feb. 1‒16.The Pulitzer Prize-winning and Tony-nominated play “Sweat” made its debut four years ago, but its concerns seem to grow more timely by the year. Playwright Lynn Nottage explores a big topic, the collapse of the American working class, through individual stories revealed in a bar in Reading, Pa., including those of two friends who have a tense reunion after serving prison time. The Chicago-bred director Kimberly Senior, who directed the Pulitzer-winning Broadway production of “Disgraced,” has updated “Sweat” for the Huntington Avenue Theatre production, which runs Jan. 31‒March 1.,If you cried over the goodbye scene in the BBC-TV/Amazon series “Fleabag,” solace is at hand. Devotees know that the television production was based on a one-woman show by the TV production’s star and creator, Phoebe Waller-Bridge. Last fall Waller-Bridge performed her play about an emotionally complicated London woman and her spectacularly dysfunctional love life for broadcast by Britain’s National Theatre Live. The performance was screened at a limited number of U.S. theaters. There will be one more round of these shows — not live this time, but a “prerecorded encore” — at the Emerson Paramount Center Jan. 31‒Feb. 2, though tickets only remain for the Feb. 1 matinee. Fans of Waller-Bridge can then start anticipating the April release of the new James Bond movie, “No Time to Die,” which she co-wrote.University affiliates with Harvard key access often can buy discounted tickets to Boston-area events through the Outings & Innings site, whose current offerings are listed here.Tina Fey gave high-school rivalries and social rituals everything they deserved in “Mean Girls,” which became a runaway hit twice: in 2003 as a movie, and in spring 2018 when it opened as a musical on Broadway. (Director Casey Nicholaw has another recent smash, “The Book of Mormon,” to his credit.) The touring version hit the road last year, and it plays the Opera House through Feb. 9. Those who grew up with Fey’s tale of fear and loathing in an Illinois classroom should find it’s lost none of its wicked wit.,Here’s one that boomers will be more than OK with: The New Rep has a revival of the iconic ’60s musical “Hair,” the show that taught Broadway about hippie-dom. The only major musical by the team of Gerome Rangi and James Rado, the 1967 play dragged the antiwar movement and the sexual revolution into the mainstream and produced a few hit singles (you’ll probably remember “Easy to Be Hard,” “Aquarius,” and the title song). Genuinely transgressive in its time, the show is now being promoted as “a nostalgic and groovy experience”— 50 years will do that. The new production is at the New Rep now through Feb 23.ARTBeginning on Valentine’s Day, the Harvard Art Museums will present one of the most comprehensive exhibits yet of early modern Japanese art. The Edo period (1615‒1868) was a fertile one for Japanese culture: A new era of peace and prosperity was at hand, and Japan opened up to outside-world influences. Much art from this era is distinguished by its exuberance, and by a juxtaposition of opposites: past with present, vulgar with refined. Two of the world’s foremost Edo art collectors, Robert S. and Betsy G. Feinberg, have opened their collection to Harvard for “Painting Edo,” which features works on scrolls, folding screens, sliding doors, and fans, and in woodblock-printed books. Timon Screech, an art historian at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, opens the exhibit with a lecture, “Into the Kaleidoscope: Painting in Edo Japan,” at 5 p.m. Feb. 13. The show runs through July 26.,The Harlem-born artist Tschabalala Self produces paintings and collages that celebrate and exaggerate the human figure, most often African American women. She mixes media — fabrics, textiles, and recycled pieces of her own work — which, she has explained, allows the bodies to “defy the narrow spaces in which they are forced to exist.” They also allow the artist to explore issues of gender and cultural identity. “Tschabalala Self: Out of Body,” which opened Jan. 20 at the Institute of Contemporary Art, is both the first Boston exhibit she’s done and the largest showing of her work to date.MUSICWinter months are usually the slowest on the music front, but even a slow season in Boston is still pretty good. The biggest name coming in the next two months is also the youngest: Billie Eilish, the L.A. songwriter who turned 18 before Christmas and just picked up five Grammy Awards on Jan. 26. With her heady electronic pop and deep and dark lyrics, she might have seem destined to become an alternative rock cult figure; instead, she turned out to be the best-selling artist of 2019 and (so far) the biggest musical star born this millennium. She’s also one of the first artists to headline the Garden with just one album to her credit. She’ll be there March 19.,Speaking of cult figures, Bat for Lashes — the band alias of English singer/songwriter Natasha Khan — made one of last year’s biggest critical hits with “Lost Girls,” an enticing homage to lost-teen films and ’80s synth-pop. The live version should be something to see, and she’s at the Sinclair Feb. 17. Another songwriter of note, local resident Juliana Hatfield, has been writing resonant songs since she fronted the Blake Babies in the ’80s — that band, by the way, got its handle when they went to a Harvard reading by Allen Ginsberg and asked him to name them. Most recently Hatfield did a full album of her favorite songs by The Police, and she’ll play those along with her originals at Once in Somerville on Feb. 12.,On a good night, Athens, Ga.’s Drive-By Truckers is one of the greatest roots-rock bands you’ll ever see, equal parts righteous anger and guitar-slinging celebration. The group’s new album, “The Unraveling,” is full of the former, but expect plenty of the latter when the Truckers hit Somerville Theatre on Feb. 22. You’ll get your money’s worth, since the band tends to play epic-length shows.It’s no stretch to call Terry Riley one of the greatest living figures in experimental music. He explored tape loops in the 1950s, absorbed Indian ragas before the Beatles made them fashionable, and pioneered the use of exotic keyboards. His late-’60s composition “A Rainbow in Curved Air” was widely influential (among others, The Who and The Velvet Underground claimed they took ideas from it). As a preamble to his 85th birthday in June, Riley is doing a string of retrospective shows, one of which hits Sanders Theatre on March 20. A more familiar sound at Sanders is the majestic vocal blend of Ladysmith Black Mambazo, the South African choir whose annual visits are always jubilant affairs. The band will play there on Feb. 2 at 2 p.m.last_img read more

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Lessons of the Week: Lin-Manuel Miranda, Barbra Streisand & More

first_img View Comments Adam Kantor, Sally Field, Scott J. Campbell, Audra McDonald, Lin-Manuel Miranda & Barbra Streisand Happy Friday! We’re sure you have some busy plans this weekend, with Bernadette Peters and Kelly Bishop’s birthdays and the Oscars, but before you order a bunch of balloons in the shapes of clowns and ballerinas, let’s have a Broadway refresher. A lot went down this week on the Great White Way, so take it all in with the Lessons of the Week.Lin’s Gonna Feed the Birds“What’s your name man? Jack, the lamplighter” doesn’t have quite the same ring as Hamilton’s opening number, but this is still pretty exciting. Fresh off his Grammy win, Lin-Manuel Miranda is in talks to star opposite Emily Blunt in Disney’s new Mary Poppins film. He won’t be a chimney sweep and he (presumably) won’t dance with penguins, but still, it’s never too soon to start rehearsing that Cockney accent!Angelica Schuyler Got a Grammy SurpriseWhen a cast recording wins the Grammy for Best Musical Theater Album, its principal soloists also win. However, Hamilton standout Renée Elise Goldsberry never got this memo. As our favorite lamplighter rapped his way through his acceptance speech, Goldsberry beamed, not realizing she too had just won. If you need an Awards primer, Renée, let us know! We don’t want you to run into this problem again in June.Liza Miller Is a Huge #LiveatFive FanAre you watching #LiveatFive, our daily Periscope broadcast with special Broadway guests? Because Liza Miller (a.k.a. two-time Tony winner Sutton Foster) probably is. On this week’s Younger, the 40-something millennial mentioned Periscope as part of her proposed marketing strategy. Take that, Laura Benanti! Just kidding, Laura. We love you, too. Let’s get vanilla ice cream. And Periscope it.Scott J. Campbell Wants to Be SketchyScott J. Campbell takes on the role of the late Gerry Goffin eight times a week in Beautiful, and while he’s playing a real person, his dream roles are bit more two-dimensional. On Live at Five, Campbell revealed that he’d love to star in the upcoming musical adaptations of Spongebob Squarepants and Frozen. We’re pretty sure the latter hasn’t been cast, so Sven can still be yours, Scott!Fears at Disaster! Are NOT Itsy-Bitsy As Broadway.com vlogger Jennifer Simard polled her Disaster! co-stars about their fears, we learned that both Adam Pascal and director Jack Plotnick have the same, highly specific fear: a spider crawling up the toilet while they’re on it. A spider suddenly biting you on the ass? Wait. Is THAT what Kiss of the Spider Woman is about? Wait. Oh my God. A Kiss of the Spider Woman revival with Plotnick and Pascal. You’re welcome.The Nederlander Has Sturdy ColumnsPlotnick, the aforementioned Disaster! director with a phobia of toilet spiders, makes his Broadway directorial debut with the jukebox musical at the Nederlander. However, it’s certainly not his first time causing a scene at that theater. Plotnick revealed that one of his first Broadway memories is seeing Rent in the standing-room-only section, where he bawled and held onto a column for dear life. Never let go, Jack!It’s Always Glass Menagerie TimeThe last time a Glass Menagerie revival was on Broadway, Beyoncé dropped a surprise album, Sandra Bullock fell from space and Queen Latiah officiated a mass gay wedding. Yes, it was a lifetime two years ago. That’s not stopping Oscar winner Sally Field, who is rumored to headline a revival later this year. While it may be soon, we can’t say no to the thought of Sam Gold having Field tell us all about her 17 gentlemen callers in one afternoon.Babs Should Eat Biscuits on the Big ScreenHelloooo, cheese grits! If you’ve ever wanted to follow Barbra Streisand around as she visits various Cracker Barrels across the United States, you’re not alone, and you have very specific desires. Tony nominee Thomas Sadoski revealed this week that he wants to make a documentary about the legend, in which she visits the aforementioned restaurant chain. 1. OK, Tom. Good thinking. 2. How does this affect the Gypsy remake?Audra’s Dog Lost It for Betty LynnWe all go crazy for Betty Buckley, but no one loses their shit more than Audra McDonald’s dog, Georgia . Unfortunately, we mean that literally. Between discussing Shuffle Along and tackling some Yahoo Answers in song on The Tonight Show, McDonald revelaed how Buckley’s visit backstage went wrong: two-month-old Georgia suddenly got diarrhea and started circling Buckley. You win, Georgia. We’ve never done that.Adam Kantor Is a Jellicle of JelliclesAdam Kantor may be in Fiddler at the Broadway Theatre, but later this summer, he can go around the corner to appear in Cats at the Neil Simon. In this week’s episode of Motel Citizen, the Broadway.com vlogger shared his, uh, interesting warmup techniques, inspired by Meisner’s repetition exercise. Watch as he meows continually with castmate Melanie Moore. Fiddler has never been so Jellicle! Star Files Lin-Manuel Mirandalast_img read more

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Chilean Army, Air Force, and Navy Support Scientific Mission in the Antarctic Region

first_imgThe expedition conducted 13 projects at the Union Glacier Joint Scientific Polar Station, including an investigation of the diversity and functionality of macrobiotic life in the area; the state of the glaciers; the effects of climate change on the environment; the optical properties of the cryosphere; and a search for bacteria and photosynthesizing organisms to learn their properties and adaptations. Transportation and security “The only efforts that can bear fruits for us in the future are scientific efforts,” Sainz said. “This has been a giant step for our country and national science,” concluded Gallardo. Support from the Chilean Military allowed a team of scientists to conduct the Union Glacier Scientific Expedition 1,080 kilometers from the South Pole from November 15 to December 15. By Dialogo January 09, 2015 “Twelve distinct species of lichens, in addition to molds and photosynthetic algae, were collected to be studied by the scientists,” according to Jorge Gallardo, INACH scientific coordinator for the expedition. “We went to search for life at those latitudes. This is a milestone for Chilean science, because it is [our] first scientific expedition in biology.” Army Soldiers provided security for the researchers and scouted the terrain, looking for appropriate locations for the scientists to explore. “Twelve distinct species of lichens, in addition to molds and photosynthetic algae, were collected to be studied by the scientists,” according to Jorge Gallardo, INACH scientific coordinator for the expedition. “We went to search for life at those latitudes. This is a milestone for Chilean science, because it is [our] first scientific expedition in biology.” A ‘milestone’ for science in Chile “This has been a giant step for our country and national science,” concluded Gallardo. A party of 33 Military officers from the Chilean Air Force, Navy and Army supported the efforts of 15 scientists under the direction of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Chilean Antarctic Institute (INACH). Logistical support from the Chilean Military Each branch of the Military performed specific tasks to support the mission: The Military also helped scientists navigate the dangerous terrain in the region. Army Soldiers provided security for the researchers and scouted the terrain, looking for appropriate locations for the scientists to explore. “The greatest difficulties in this place are the crevices, which can be from two meters to 100 meters deep, plus the zero visibility and disorientation that occurs when you are surrounded by snow,” explained Navy Supply Lieutenant Héctor Pezo. “We performed 100 percent of the tasks, just as they had been planned. We supported the scientists and we kept the station in operation for the entire time.” Though research on such primitive organisms may seem academic, such creatures can have pharmaceutical properties and yield insights that contribute to the creation of new drugs or the understanding of diseases. Such research can also have agricultural applications, often leading to the development of new pesticides or fertilizer compounds. The projects are part of the National Antarctic Science Program (PROCIEN), managed by INACH, and were selected for the expedition from a total of 60 proposals. This expedition also was conducted to further Chile’s geopolitical interests, in their search to link the military’s interest in protecting sovereignty with the interest in scientific development at the southern extremes of the globe. This way, they fulfilled their mandate under the Antarctic Treaty, signed by Chile in 1959. “The greatest difficulties in this place are the crevices, which can be from two meters to 100 meters deep, plus the zero visibility and disorientation that occurs when you are surrounded by snow,” explained Navy Supply Lieutenant Héctor Pezo. “We performed 100 percent of the tasks, just as they had been planned. We supported the scientists and we kept the station in operation for the entire time.” In spite of the extreme conditions, it was a “benign environment,” said Dr. Raúl Cordero, a scientist from the University of Santiago de Chile. The stable climate in the area is “like a desert of ice where it never rains and the winds rarely blow.” The scientists, Airmen, Troops, and Sailors prepared for the mission by training for various emergency situations, learning rescue techniques, first aid, and the proper attire to wear for the harsh temperatures, which fluctuated between a high of -5ºC and lows of -15ºC with winds of 5 knots. Transportation and security The Union Glacier Joint Scientific Polar Station is one of three bases in the world located in the Antarctic Circle; the other two are the U.S. Amundsen-Scott base and China’s Kunlun base. The Military also helped scientists navigate the dangerous terrain in the region. Support from the Chilean Military allowed a team of scientists to conduct the Union Glacier Scientific Expedition 1,080 kilometers from the South Pole from November 15 to December 15. Naval personnel activated the camp and were responsible for its daily operations, including providing food. Naval personnel were also in charge of scheduling the scientific excursions with the help of a meteorologist who helped determine departure times and the duration of each trip. The expedition conducted 13 projects at the Union Glacier Joint Scientific Polar Station, including an investigation of the diversity and functionality of macrobiotic life in the area; the state of the glaciers; the effects of climate change on the environment; the optical properties of the cryosphere; and a search for bacteria and photosynthesizing organisms to learn their properties and adaptations. The results of this expedition will be released near the end of 2015, once scientists conclude their study of the samples and information collected. Though research on such primitive organisms may seem academic, such creatures can have pharmaceutical properties and yield insights that contribute to the creation of new drugs or the understanding of diseases. Such research can also have agricultural applications, often leading to the development of new pesticides or fertilizer compounds. The projects are part of the National Antarctic Science Program (PROCIEN), managed by INACH, and were selected for the expedition from a total of 60 proposals. Naval personnel activated the camp and were responsible for its daily operations, including providing food. Naval personnel were also in charge of scheduling the scientific excursions with the help of a meteorologist who helped determine departure times and the duration of each trip. In spite of the extreme conditions, it was a “benign environment,” said Dr. Raúl Cordero, a scientist from the University of Santiago de Chile. The stable climate in the area is “like a desert of ice where it never rains and the winds rarely blow.” The Chilean Air Force used Hercules aircraft to transport scientists and Troops to and from the base. Airmen also transported supplies for the researchers and Soldiers. A ‘milestone’ for science in Chile Logistical support from the Chilean Military During the expedition, the researchers collected specimens that will advance scientific knowledge in Chile. The Chilean Air Force used Hercules aircraft to transport scientists and Troops to and from the base. Airmen also transported supplies for the researchers and Soldiers. The Union Glacier Joint Scientific Polar Station is one of three bases in the world located in the Antarctic Circle; the other two are the U.S. Amundsen-Scott base and China’s Kunlun base. The results of this expedition will be released near the end of 2015, once scientists conclude their study of the samples and information collected. “The only efforts that can bear fruits for us in the future are scientific efforts,” Sainz said. Each branch of the Military performed specific tasks to support the mission: During the expedition, the researchers collected specimens that will advance scientific knowledge in Chile. The scientists, Airmen, Troops, and Sailors prepared for the mission by training for various emergency situations, learning rescue techniques, first aid, and the proper attire to wear for the harsh temperatures, which fluctuated between a high of -5ºC and lows of -15ºC with winds of 5 knots. A party of 33 Military officers from the Chilean Air Force, Navy and Army supported the efforts of 15 scientists under the direction of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Chilean Antarctic Institute (INACH). Cooperation and logistical support from the Chilean Armed Forces made the research expedition possible. General Manuel Sainz, commander of the Chilean Air Force’s Fourth Brigade, led the planning for the logistics of the mission in the city of Punta Arenas, a six-hour flight from Union Glacier. This expedition also was conducted to further Chile’s geopolitical interests, in their search to link the military’s interest in protecting sovereignty with the interest in scientific development at the southern extremes of the globe. This way, they fulfilled their mandate under the Antarctic Treaty, signed by Chile in 1959. Cooperation and logistical support from the Chilean Armed Forces made the research expedition possible. General Manuel Sainz, commander of the Chilean Air Force’s Fourth Brigade, led the planning for the logistics of the mission in the city of Punta Arenas, a six-hour flight from Union Glacier. last_img read more

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Berger: NAFCU ready to work with Clinton, Trump on credit union regulatory relief

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NAFCU’s Dan Berger reiterated the heavy toll regulatory burden takes on credit unions and their 104 million members in letters Thursday to presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, and he noted the association’s willingness to work with both parties in this regard.Berger, NAFCU’s president and CEO, thanked Clinton for her support in wanting to cut regulatory red tape for credit unions, as noted in her recently released platform for small business and fact sheet for supporting credit unions.“Credit unions have faced a tidal wave of new regulatory burdens in recent years,” Berger wrote in his letter to Clinton, which was also sent to Democratic vice presidential nominee and Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine. “We are pleased to see your commitment to tailoring regulations and cutting down on regulatory creep.”In his letters to both nominees, Berger pointed out that since the second quarter of 2010, more than 1,500 federally-insured credit unions have been lost. “Many smaller institutions simply cannot keep up with the increased regulatory expectations and have been forced to merge out of business,” he wrote. “There is an urgent need for meaningful regulatory relief and better tailoring of regulations to help credit unions.” continue reading »last_img read more

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6 credit union marketing tricks that work every time

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr If you are managing the social marketing content at your credit union then you’ll want to read these 6 credit union marketing tricks that work every time. As a content marketing agency for credit unions, we know first hand what tricks work every time.Offer an Internal Staff Contest to Gain More FollowersIs your credit union relatively new to social media? Maybe you are looking to grow your followers? The first place we typically start with new clients is to have their credit union offer an internal contest to their staff on Facebook (but this can be replicated on any platform, like Instagram).Simply ask your staff to build up your followers with their family and friends to be entered to win a monetary reward (i.e. $100 Visa Gift Card). For every friend the staff member gets to ‘like’ the CU’s Facebook page, his or her name will go into the pot to win! If 10 friends ‘like’ the CU’s page, then that staff member’s name will be entered 10 times to win! This type of contest has been proven to be successful for several clients, and it also helps to boost excitement around the social movement among the staff at a CU. continue reading »last_img read more

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WHO issues rapid-response plan for flu pandemic

first_imgJan 27, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) has released a draft plan for nipping a potential influenza pandemic in the bud, saying that even if such an attempt fails, it may buy precious time to make more vaccine and improve other preparations.The 16-page plan calls for using quarantine, social distancing, and antiviral drugs to try to stop an emerging pandemic flu virus, if it can be detected early enough. The WHO intends to refine the plan by Apr 1 and begin training rapid-response teams in May.”Containment of a potential pandemic has never been attempted; the world has never before received an advance warning that a pandemic may be imminent,” the “WHO Pandemic Influenza Draft Protocol for Rapid Response and Containment” states. “The practical and logistics challenges are formidable and success is not assured.”Indeed, many disease experts are skeptical that stopping an emerging pandemic is possible, given the weak public health and disease surveillance systems in many of the countries hardest hit by H5N1 avian flu, where a pandemic is considered most likely to start. Skeptics also cite the lack of a vaccine and scant supplies of antiviral drugs.But the WHO document says the attempt should be made, because it could save millions of lives and prevent economic and social disruption.”Even if containment efforts ultimately fail to stop the emergence of a fully fit pandemic virus, these efforts could slow the initial spread of the pandemic and give countries time to increase preparedness,” the draft states.”Each day gained following the emergence of a pandemic virus—if rapidly detected—allows the production of around 5 million doses of a pandemic vaccine. Each added day gives countries more time to adapt routine health services to an emergency situation.”In addition, efforts to develop a capability for rapid containment will help strengthen national, regional, and international health capacities, the plan says.As reasons for hope that containment is possible, the WHO cites Hong Kong’s experience with the H5N1 virus in 1997, when the destruction of all poultry prevented further avian outbreaks and human cases. The plan also mentions two mathematical modeling studies that suggested that containment may be possible under certain conditions.The purpose of the plan is to facilitate rapid detection of potential signs that the H5N1 virus (or other potential pandemic flu strains) is becoming more transmissible among humans and to guide effective responses before the virus can escape an initial outbreak zone, the document says.Under the plan, countries are responsible for surveillance—looking for signals indicating that a novel flu virus has begun to spread from person to person. One possible signal would be the discovery of a virus that has a hemagglutinin gene derived from a nonhuman flu virus and internal genes derived from a human flu virus. Another likely signal would be a finding that a novel flu virus has spread from one person to at least five others.Countries are expected to report such signals to the WHO within 24 hours. The agency then will consider whether a containment effort is warranted and feasible. Containment will not be attempted if there is no laboratory confirmation of a novel flu virus or if the virus has already spread so far as to make quarantine impractical, the plan says.If containment is attempted, the country involved will be expected to coordinate with the WHO in implementing quarantine measures, distributing and administering antiviral drugs, conducting surveillance, and implementing other public health measures. In the quarantine zone, antivirals will be used to treat sick people and to prevent illness in those with no symptoms, according to the plan.”The concept of rapid containment depends upon the rapid availability of antiviral drugs and additional supplies and equipment,” the plan notes. It says the WHO’s stockpile of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) now amounts to 1.5 million treatment courses and will grow to 3 million courses by May, with another 2 million courses pledged by Roche, the manufacturer.A number of countries are building their own stockpiles, and some regional stockpiles are planned as well, the WHO says. There is no coordination among the various stockpiles, but the WHO hopes to “define the operational relationships” among them so that they can be used in a coordinated way to support rapid response and containment.The document doesn’t address the question of whether existing antivirals will be effective against a pandemic strain. Experience with the use of oseltamivir in people infected with H5N1 has yielded little evidence of its effectiveness, though patients may have received the drug too late, according to a report published in The Lancet last week.The WHO will mobilize and coordinate all international and regional support for an affected country, the plan promises.The agency plans to assign three to five staff members to a working group, augmented by recruits from other organizations, to further develop the plan. The WHO timeline calls for drafting a more detailed plan by Mar 6 and then holding a global meeting in Geneva from Mar 6 to 10 to reach agreement on “fundamental concepts and standard operating procedures.”Next the agency will develop teaching materials and recruit faculty so that training of rapid-response teams can begin in May, the document says. Teams will include people with skills in laboratory diagnostics, epidemiology, clinical management, infection control, veterinary medicine, ethics, and other areas. They will receive about 2 weeks of training.The rapid-response plan is one of three major strategies for addressing the pandemic threat, the WHO says. The other two consist of the efforts to contain H5N1 avian flu in poultry and the efforts to improve the world’s general preparedness for a pandemic.See also:WHO draft plan for rapid response and containmenthttp://www2.wpro.who.int/NR/rdonlyres/EDA8DF37-AD85-425E-9431-1D80476C2639/0/WHOHQ20060530.pdflast_img read more

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