Category: egnoqtuwh

Three Generations of Sailors Serving Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln

first_imgThree generations of Sailors born between the late 1950s through the mid-1990s are serving aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) as the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier undergoes its refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH) in Newport News.As each Sailor is different so too are the generations they represent with the majority of the nearly 2,500 Sailors assigned to the carrier are known as Millenial or Generation Y and brings with them their own style of problem solving and experience. The majority of the crew, slightly more than 80 percent, is representative of this generation of those born prior to the launch of the personal computer through the birth of the World Wide Web.Lt. Cmdr. Tony Beaster, Lincoln’s training officer, explains how these three separate generations of Sailors respond to training, motivation and education.Prior to reporting to Lincoln, Beaster studied manpower and analysis, earning a master’s degree from Capella University in 2010. While at Capella, he studied how people learn, interact and specifically how motivation affects different groups of people.“What motivates a baby boomer is different then what motivates a millenial,” said Beaster. “The goals are different for each group.”Less than one percent of the crew is defined as a Baby Boomer, born between 1946 through 1964. Slightly more Sailors, about 19 percent, fit into the Generation X mold. This group, like Beaster, is defined as those individuals born between 1965 and 1981. Generation X Sailors are typically team orientated, believe in a work and family-life balance, and have strong loyalty to their relationships.Beaster added that while each generation responds differently to motivation, they also view work differently.“For Baby Boomers working is simply a means to an end and for a Millenial if they didn’t need to work, they wouldn’t,” said Beaster.According to Beaster, each generation is motivated in a myriad of ways. Baby Boomers respond positively to pay raises and new titles when being awarded for their work acumen, said Beaster, whereas Generation X Sailors respond positively if they are given time off or time away from the job. Millenials, Beaster added, are best motivated if they receive immediate recognition for a job well done.Beaster takes into consideration the divergent generations aboard the Lincoln especially since the majority of Sailors who have grown up with the Internet and added that this type of learning style also effects how they live and engage.“Learning how to interact and communicate with these groups will help us to determine the best way to train each group and pass information and solicit feedback,” said Beaster.Personnel Specialist Seaman Apprentice Catherine Kapic, assigned to the Administrative Department aboard USS Abraham Lincoln was born in 1994 and reflects on her communication style with her fellow Sailors.“Texting to me is the easiest and emails are more like letters and require more thought before sending,” said Kapic.Beaster said that Millenials respond more positively when supervisors allow them to tackle their to-do lists and admonish micromanagement work styles.“You can motivate the Millenials by giving them the list of everything we need them to do, and let them figure out what is important,” said Beaster. “They like being given the problem. Giving them a due date is an absolute need, but Millenials don’t always react well to last-minute changes.”Beaster added that both Baby Boomers and Generation X Sailors are more prone to roll with the punches and adapt more quickly to changed plans and schedules, but Millenials need more structure.Education, according to Beaster, is a common denominator for Baby Boomers and Millenials.“Baby boomers are more interested in gaining a skill set than a four or six-year degree and many Millenials are reverting back to the Baby Boomer mentality,” said Beaster.”Another motivating factor is the region a Sailor was raised and how they were raised.”Lincoln is truly a representation of the United States. Sailors from every state are assigned to the Lincoln. California remains in the lead with more than 300 Sailors calling that state home. Rhode Island and Vermont are at a tie with three Sailors each hailing from those states.Motivation and work styles are different across each generation. So too are the communication styles.Beaster said that whether Sailors are from Washington, Texas or New York, one thing connects all three generations — their need for communicating. Beaster added that understanding how they best like to communicate is the key to bridging the communication gap.[mappress]Press Release, October 22, 2013 View post tag: Abraham Training & Education View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Defense View post tag: Generations Three Generations of Sailors Serving Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln View post tag: serving View post tag: USS View post tag: sailors View post tag: Lincoln Share this article View post tag: Defence View post tag: Aboard October 22, 2013 Back to overview,Home naval-today Three Generations of Sailors Serving Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln View post tag: three View post tag: Navy View post tag: Navallast_img read more

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If I were Vice Chancellor for a day…

first_img…I’d move Oxford up north. For a centre of worldwide academic eminence, Oxford’s founders were surprisingly stupid when deciding where to put it. If I were establishing a community of scholars and the only two spaces left on Earth were in Hell and the Thames Valley, I’d have to toss a coin. The unfortunate proximity of South-East England to the Continent ensures winters are ludicrously cold, while building a city between two rivers doesn’t seem like such a bright idea now that global warming means constant rain on North Parade (which is, typically of Oxford, actually south of South Parade). Starry-eyed Southerners will champion Oxford’s proximity to London nightlife as a selling point, but all I’m saying is that I’d never heard the phrase ‘I’ve been mugged again’ until I met a Londoner. Although possibly they’re just referring to paying £20 to get into a club.No – as we approach Oxford’s second millennium of academic excellence, it’s clear that drastic reform is needed. We simply must move Oxford up North.This might seem like the kind of radical governance that’d have Congregation forcing me out of the job by half-past nine in the morning (‘You’re going to do what to me? Write a strongly-worded letter to the Telegraph? Oh, please, Professor, anything but that!’), but a move up North would alleviate many of the university’s problems. Few colleges have the space to accommodate students on site for the duration of their course. Some build annexes, but space is at such a premium in central Oxford that many are closer to Coventry than Carfax. If Oxford were up North, living out would become affordable. Rooms in student houses cost about £60 per week in my home city of Liverpool, while at Edinburgh University, for £75 a week, I could live in the grand district of Morningside. Colleges would find acquiring land for annexes no problem, as derelict mills in Lancashire go for about a tenner, and are a damn sight more beautiful than the kind of sixties monstrosity erected by most Oxford colleges.The quality of food in Hall often evokes consternation, the catch being that colleges are either accomplished but too expensive (such as my own, with delicious formals that, at £8, cost about as much as a deposit on a house in Newcastle) or cheap but uninspiring (such as a certain rather academic college, where the fact that this is the JCR food rep’s third successive year in office can only mean that the students are too busy revising to eat in Hall ever.) Yet kitchen facilities in many colleges are poor or non-existent, and eating out in Oxford is prohibitively expensive for those on tight budgets. Up North, however, eating out is gloriously cheap. According to a national newspaper’s study of various UK locations, Oxford has the unhealthiest air, more polluted even than in London, and breathing it is apparently the equivalent of smoking 60 fags a day – but minus the steadying effect on the nerves. In my first term at university, I developed a chronic asthmatic wheeze which disappears whenever I return to Liverpool, and recurs every time I come back to Oxford. Similarly, as a fresher I acquired a nasty rash on my arms and legs until I was informed that it was probably the drinking water, the River Thames being the most polluted in the country. I stopped, and the rash disappeared. If for no other reason then, as Vice-Chancellor my main concern would be the health of students, something which would be far easier to maintain just a little further from its unfortunate location.by Heather Ryanlast_img read more

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Commentary: What Women And Men Don’t Want

first_imgBy Abdul Hakim-Shabazzindypolitics.orgLike a lot of you, I find allegations of sexual misconduct against Republican Alabama U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore alarming.  I find it even more disturbing that there are people who think molesting a child is fine if that individual isn’t running for public office as a Democrat. And we are not going to play the “what about” game where you insert the name of someone whose politics you don’t agree with as justification for someone else’s bad behavior. What will I entertain however is the question as to why didn’t Moore’s alleged victims come forward sooner? To someone unfamiliar with the impact that sexual abuse and assault have on the victim, I can see how that’s a fair question. And it’s a question I’ve been asking a lot of victims lately.I recently put out a request in my social media circles asking if anyone had been on the receiving end of sexually inappropriate conduct and how they dealt with it. I can honestly say the answers ran the entire spectrum and gender was not an issue. I heard from women accosted by men, men accosted by women and there were even instances where both the victim and perpetrator were of the same sex.I spoke with people in the service industry who’d been touched by patrons. Some people were accosted by superiors either at work or work-related functions. A close friend was smacked on the rear end by her boss in front of two other male employees.  And one person even was put in a very uncomfortable situation by an elected official while on an out of state trip back in the 1970s, and both were the same gender. There also some examples that I can’t print without getting really graphic.When asked how they dealt with the situations, I noticed a distinct pattern. If it was a customer service relationship, the response was usually pretty quick and swift and involved a witty retort. Most customers took the hint and backed off; the more aggressive ones were immediately escorted out of the building. If it was a boss-employee relationship, it got a little more complicated. Many of the victims were young or just starting their careers and perpetrators were usually people who were higher up in the company structure.For example, one close friend back in the early 90s was groped in an elevator by a company vice president. Another colleague was “encouraged” to be more “cooperative” if she wanted to get ahead in the company structure. And one male victim was invited to a company function, but it turned out he was the only one who got the invitation from his female boss. So why not report the bad behavior? The reasons are numerous.One common thread was that many of the victims didn’t think anyone would believe them. Think about this: a 24-year old new female employee accuses the company V.P. of sexual harassment in the 1980s or early 90s? Who is seriously going to believe her?Also, many victims at times will blame themselves for the behavior, and thinking had they done something different, the incident would not have occurred. As an attorney, I helped a young lady a few years ago deal with a similar situation after being attacked while at school. The hardest part of helping her was convincing her she did nothing wrong and her attacker was the bad actor.And when it comes to children and teenagers, take these issues and multiply them a thousand times.It’s abundantly clear that Roy Moore, Harvey Weinstein, Al Franken and Kevin Spacey have raised new awareness about sexual predators and misconduct. The challenge now is where do we go from here? A friend who had been on the receiving end of this behavior made a very salient point to me last week. She says as more people come forward, it will raise more awareness about the issue and by doing so, more victims will come forward sooner and report inappropriate behavior and maybe, just maybe, it will encourage all of us to behave a little better because we know some things are just unacceptable.That would be something both men and women want.FOOTNOTE: Abdul-Hakim is the editor and publisher of IndyPolitics.Org. His opinions are his own, but you are free to adopt them if you wish.This article was posted by the CCO without Opinion, bias or editing.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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viewpoint

first_imgFor supermarkets, short and efficient supply chains must be the ultimate ’gold standard’ to aim for. This week, Sainsbury’s announced a brand new initiative on bakery, sourcing wheat from a UK farmers’ co-operative (pg 4). It is an admirable way of supporting British farmers and lowering the carbon footprint, while achieving the longer-term aim of dispensing with Canadian wheat.Sainsbury’s research shows that customers want to know provenance. So the wheat, harvested within a 30-mile radius of East Anglia’s breadbasket, helps to fulfil that criterion.The ’local sourcing’ message has been around for some time, but is gaining ground, and Sainsbury’s has found an original way to deliver on the bakery front. Years ago, we used to emphasise ’Buy British’. The EU has tried to make that unfashionable and would like to impose an EU label but there has been strong opposition, from the French in particular!Sainsbury’s has also launched a British Flour Develop-ment Group, designed to drive efficiency and discuss everything from pesticide use to other environmental issues. Personally, I have always lamented the fact there is little alternative to organic and non-organic, believing that there should be a middle ground of ’natural’, which should include pesticide-free, and no use of chemical fertilisers, for example. The only problem would be policing it.Meanwhile, the issue of 18% Capital Gains tax to be levied on small businesses, removing taper relief, just won’t go away. Congratulations to the CBI and others for their continued lobbying of both government and the media; that is the only way to get noticed. As Edmund Burke once said: “All it takes for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.” But this tax increase is the latest in a series of punitive measures to undermine small companies – never mind the knock-on effects of the minimum wage and increasing business rates and rents.Our feature on pg 14 looks at how French bakers thrive alongside supermarkets. British businesses simply do not get the same local authority support as those in Europe, where local councils are fiercely protective of local shops, while still supporting the supermarkets. The EU interferes and imposes legislation in some areas, while totally ignoring it in others. There’s no rhyme or reason to it at all.last_img read more

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Harvard grad and HMS student are Rhodes Scholars

first_imgMatthews Mmopi, a recent Harvard graduate from South Africa, and David Obert, a second-year Harvard Medical School (HMS) student, have been selected as Rhodes Scholars, and will join the University’s four U.S. Rhodes winners at the University of Oxford next fall.A member of the Class of 2011, Mmopi was selected as one of 10 winners from the Southern Africa region, which includes Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, and Swaziland. At Oxford, Mmopi plans to pursue a master’s in philosophy in development studies. Obert, a native of Edmonton, Alberta, and a graduate of McGill University in Montreal, is one of three representatives from the prairie region of Canada. He was nominated for the Rhodes by Harvard Medical School.“The Rhodes Scholarship, to me, represents an unrivaled opportunity to further my capacity to champion political consciousness and freedom in the world,” Mmopi said. “I would like to examine the role of gender in shaping the political, economic, and social opportunities available to individuals in order to evaluate how African societies can close gender gaps in economic and political participation and access to education and health.”While at Harvard, Mmopi completed an internship at the Harvard College Women’s Center, an experience that helped spur his interest in gender issues in Africa. He also volunteered at Harvard’s Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response, served as programing coordinator for the Harvard Black Students Association, and served as a senior counselor in the Summer Urban Program at the Phillips Brooks House Association.In addition, Mmopi served as director of enterprise for the Harvard Africa Business and Investment Club, as student co-chair on the Ann Radcliffe Trust/Women’s Center Community Fund Advisory Board, and as president of the Kuumba Singers of Harvard College. “I believe my studies in economics and African studies coupled with my internship at the Harvard College Women’s Center helped to shape my intended course of study at Oxford. Through these experiences, I examined gender, political, and socioeconomic factors as causes and solutions to Africa’s development problems.”David Obert at the Kibale Health and Conservation Centre in Kibale, Uganda. Obert has been named a Rhodes Scholar. Photo courtesy of David ObertObert to pursue double master’s degreeAs a teen, two concussions from hockey and ski racing left David Obert struggling to concentrate, unable to stay awake in class, and in peril of being unable to finish high school. Now the HMS second-year student has been named a 2012 Rhodes Scholar, one of 83 men and women from 14 countries and regions around the world to win the prestigious award.Created in 1902 by the will of British philanthropist Cecil Rhodes, the scholarships cover all costs for two or three years of study at Oxford. Winners are selected on the basis of high academic achievement, personal integrity, leadership potential and physical vigor, among other attributes.At Oxford, Obert plans to pursue a double master’s degree in public policy and global health science.Obert spent the summer working on a joint Harvard/NATO study examining how foreign militaries contribute to health sector stabilization in fragile states. Specifically, he focused on a case study examining the military response to the 2010 Haitian earthquake as it related to human health. He worked with Vanessa Kerry, instructor in medicine at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital and director of the Global Public Policy and Social Change Program in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at HMS, and Margaret Bourdeaux, a core faculty member of Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Division of Global Health Equity.Obert says he has always had an interest in how the world works on a macro scale — seeing the geopolitical landscape and watching how large organizations and governments interact.“I could see myself having a career a little bit like my supervisors from the summer,” he said. “I’d love to have the clinical side and patient contact — which brought me to medicine in the first place — but also be able to make an impact on another level, helping shape how big organizations work and how large scale responses to health needs are rolled out.”— Jake Miller/Harvard Medical Schoollast_img read more

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Alumni Awards 2016

first_imgThis year, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and CAES Alumni Association recognized bankers, farmers and Cooperative Extension leaders as part of its annual awards program.“From the farm and field to the board and exam rooms, our alumni are leaders in a variety of areas,” said Elliott Marsh, president of the CAES Alumni Association. “These awards not only allow us to recognize the accomplishments of our fellow alumni, but also the ways in which CAES has contributed to our collective success.”The alumni association recognized its 2016 award winners at the annual CAES Alumni Awards Banquet on Nov. 11 in Athens, Georgia.UGA soybean pioneer John Woodruff, of Tifton, Georgia, and former Georgia Rep. Richard Royal, of Camilla, Georgia, were inducted into the Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame. To find out more about these new inductees, visit tinyurl.com/GaAgHallofFame2016.This year, the alumni association awarded four Alumni Awards of Excellence. These awards recognize CAES alumni who have achieved excellence in their chosen fields or in their communities. This year’s winners include:Beverly Sparks, former CAES associate dean for ExtensionSparks, who graduated from UGA with her undergraduate degree in horticulture in 1978, went on to receive her master’s degree in entomology from UGA and her doctorate in entomology from Louisiana State University. After a long career in UGA Extension, Sparks was named associate dean for Extension within CAES in 2007. She was the first woman to lead UGA Extension, and she served as director of Extension until 2014. Her leadership is credited with helping Extension weather the financial turmoil that accompanied the Great Recession.D. Wayne Akins Jr., chief retail banking officer of Synovus BankAkins comes from a long line of CAES graduates. His grandfather graduated from the college in 1960. His mother served as a 4-H Extension agent for 30 years. Akins credits Josef Broder, currently the associate dean for academic affairs, for helping him find his career path.From 1998 to 2009, Akins served as the CEO and president of Sea Island Bank in Statesboro, Georgia. During his time there, Akins directed the strategic growth, profitability and market shares of the organization. He led nine executives and more than 140 personnel.When Sea Island Bank was consolidated into Synovus Bank, he assumed a leadership position and now serves as chief retail banking officer for the company, which operates 280 branch offices in five southeastern states.Charles Hubert Bronson Jr., former Florida commissioner of agriculture and consumer servicesBronson received a bachelor’s degree in animal science and agricultural education in 1972. Over the course of his career, he taught agricultural science at Gainesville High School, worked as a agricultural supply salesman and was elected to the Florida State Senate representing Brevard and Osceola counties.In addition to serving on several authorities and advisory committees across the state, Bronson served as state senator from 1994 to 2001, when he was named commissioner of agriculture and consumer services by Gov. Jeb Bush. He was subsequently reelected to two more terms, serving in the post until he retired in 2011.Lowry Weyman Hunt, Jr., sixth-generation Morgan County, Georgia, farmerHunt was the first in his family to seek a college degree in agriculture.He graduated from CAES in 1980 with a bachelor’s degree in agriculture. During his time at UGA, he majored in animal science and minored in agronomy. Hunt knew that knowledge in these areas would help him run the family business, Godfrey’s Warehouse, and the family farm, Innisfail Farm.Innisfail, a 2,200-acre timber and cattle farm, has been in Hunt’s family for six generations. Hunt took over operations in 1972. The alumni association also honored three young alumni through its CAES Young Alumni Achievement Awards. These awards recognize CAES alumni under 35 who have achieved excellence in their chosen fields or in their communities. The 2016 award winners include:Allison Perkins, UGA Extension 4-H and Youth Development agent in Bartow CountyPerkins graduated from CAES in 2005. She majored in animal science, then went on to get her master’s degree in agricultural leadership.In her current position, Perkins is responsible for implementing educational programs for 4-H youth within Bartow County, Georgia. She carries out equine programs for youth.Cliff Riner, coordinator of the Vidalia Onion and Vegetable Research Center and Vidalia onion area Extension agentRiner received his bachelor’s degree in agricultural education from CAES in 2006 and is currently pursuing his master’s degree in agricultural and environmental education.Riner started his career as the Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent in Tattnall County, Georgia, and was promoted to his current position as coordinator of the Vidalia Onion and Vegetable Research Center and the Vidalia onion area UGA Extension agent in 2013.Luke Lanier, assistant vice president of Metter BankLanier graduated from CAES in 2007 with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics.After graduation, Lanier accepted a job at Durden Banking Company and moved back to his family farm in Candler County, Georgia. Lanier spent the past eight years helping local farmers by coordinating agricultural lending.For more information about the ways that alumni of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have shaped the world visit alumni.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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UN Under-Secretary-General Praises the Promotion of Alternative Crops in Colombia

first_imgBy Dialogo September 30, 2011 UN Under-Secretary-General and head of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Yury Fedotov praised the development of alternative crops in Colombia, during an official visit to that country. “Colombia’s primary objective is drug control, and alternative development plays a very important role,” Fedotov told reporters in Bogota, after visiting rubber crops in Antioquia, in the nation’s northwest, that have replaced coca plantings. Fedotov maintained that those programs, coordinated by the Office of the Colombian President’s High Counselor for Social Action, could be applied “in other parts of the world, not only in neighboring countries like Peru, but also in Afghanistan.” Together with the Office of the Counselor for Social Action, UNODC is implementing a program to replace drug crops with plantings of coffee, cacao and chocolate, hearts of palm, and rubber. This program supports 153,000 rural workers who previously dedicated themselves to planting coca and has generated more than 28,000 direct and indirect jobs. Last year, Colombia achieved a significant decrease in areas planted with coca, which went from 68,000 to 57,000 hectares. Fedotov, who arrived in the South American country on September 24, also met with President Juan Manuel Santos, with whom he spoke about collaboration in the fight against drugs, organized crime, corruption, money laundering, and terrorism financing.last_img read more

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Something Smells Rotten About the Latest Snafu at the Ronkonkoma Hub

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Long Islanders may have to wait just a little longer if they were expecting transformative growth at the Ronkonkoma Hub.The reason for the delay? Sewering—and the disingenuous attempts of regional planning being undertaken by Suffolk County.The Ronkonkoma Hub, the darling project for many-a-smart growth advocates, may be one of the few projects on Long Island worth the praise it has received. It offers the opportunity for true intermodal access spanning the automobile, bus, train and airplane. Unlike other ambitious projects its size, this $538 million Hub has faced minimal NIMBY outcry from the surrounding area. While residents’ concerns about density still haunt the project, overall public support for the Hub has been snowballing from both civic leaders and municipalities since it was first pitched a few years ago.In 2012, East Setauket-based Tritec development became the master developer for 50 or so acres around the ever-bustling Ronkonkoma train station. One of the region’s busiest commuter transit hubs, the site has long been viewed as an economic engine to power Suffolk County. Only recently has any real progress on this goal been seen. In 2014, the Brookhaven Town Planning Board adopted what’s called a form-based code to set an orderly template of growth. Last year the town board gave the green light to the first phase of development at the Hub, with 489 residential units slated for 10 acres. Progress, yes, but the approval came with the condition that the project would have a viable sewer connection.Last October, a supposed regional planning alliance was formed between Brookhaven and Islip, the two towns where the Hub is located. At first glance, one would assume this partnership would have helped the project further along, but this hasn’t been the case.Once again, the issue of sewers and the treatment of wastewater, which has plagued many Long Island projects, reared its ugly head.The Town of Brookhaven had authored and adopted an Environmental Impact Statement that included a proposal for a $25 million sewer plant for the Hub project. Suffolk County accepted the concept, and the legislature approved the funding to make it a reality.Since then, the county has apparently shifted its position. Now it claims it wants to build a seven-mile pipeline from the Ronkonkoma Hub site through the Village of Islandia (whose residents reportedly weren’t exactly pleased with the idea) to the Bergin Point Sewage Treatment Plant in West Babylon. From there, wastewater would be released three miles into the Atlantic Ocean via an aging outfall pipe. The county claims that its solution would save Suffolk’s already beleaguered taxpayers $2 to $3 million while shaving precious time off the ever-expanding construction timeline, now slated to take another decade.Both Islip and Brookhaven were initially onboard, but state Sen. Tom Croci (R-Islip), a former Islip Town supervisor, proposed another pipeline path. His new route would essentially double the opportunity for growth within the township by offering more sewer infrastructure, but it would also more than double the cost from $24 million to $55 million.“This alternate route would be much more expensive,” admitted Islip Town Councilwoman Trish Bergin-Weichbrodt, a Republican, at the March 2015 press conference held at Islip Town Hall to promote the new trajectory, “but the benefit would certainly be worth the buck.”In Croci’s proposal, the extended sewer line would meander south through Oakdale and Sayville before hooking up with a connection to Bergin Point. While the idea sounds nice, no public officials involved with proposing the longer route provided details regarding how this expanded pipeline would be funded.What is most vexing is why at this stage of the game is the answer to the wastewater issue not already understood, agreed upon and moving forward?The county’s sewer solution seems to accommodate Tritec’s needs and little else. Not only does its proposed pipeline shortsightedly bypass MacArthur Airport, it skips any additional opportunities for regional growth beyond the Ronkonkoma Hub.  Sen. Croci’s route extension addresses these issues, but doubles the price point far beyond the original proposal as well as the county’s cheaper route.From the regional perspective, Suffolk County, Islip and Brookhaven should decide together which of these three options is the most beneficial: a completely new wastewater treatment plant constructed at the Hub site  to discharge clean water back into the aquifer, which might also spur growth at nearby MacArthur Airport and its surrounding industrial areas; a quick-fix pipeline proposed by Suffolk County that bypasses the airport;  or Sen. Croci’s extended pipeline that snakes through various South Shore communities but comes with a hefty price tag and no promise of who foots the bill?To further complicate matters, these pipeline proposals raise concern over the environmental impacts they would have, along with questions regarding the county’s intentions.What’s the point of creating new sewer infrastructure if we’re just going to move effluent from point A to point B? How will an ocean outfall pipe, which would prevent treated wastewater being absorbed back into the groundwater, affect nearby Lake Ronkonkoma? Further, can the area’s aging infrastructure accommodate the Hub’s needs, as well as the other completed and proposed sewer expansions in both Wyandanch and West Babylon? The treatment capacity at the Bergin Point sewer plant is being expanded to allow for additional growth, but will that be enough when all these projects pending approval are finally built?The solution shouldn’t be left to political preference, but grounded in environmental data. So far, it seems that the county is more interested in finding a sewer option that would speed up development instead of balancing the need for economic growth and the protection of our natural resources.The conflicting approaches to sewering at the Hub highlights the Island’s collective inability to think and act regionally while adding to the perception—warranted or not—that local governments too often seek only to accommodate the builders at the public’s expense.It’s right to consider the Ronkonkoma Hub a transformative project because it has the potential to make a lasting difference not only on the Towns of Islip and Brookhaven, but on Long Island as a whole. It’s one of the best locations around for transit-oriented development because 42 percent of the LIRR’s total ridership uses the main line there. Why not harness its economic potential? But these squabbles about the sewering issue derails progress.If the Suffolk’s intent was to speed up Tritec’s construction timeline, it failed.If the administration truly wanted to engage in regional planning, they would have brought all the stakeholders to the table—the Towns, the Village of Islandia, local residents, Tritec and wastewater engineers—and worked on a realistic solution when the latest iteration of the project was first seriously considered in 2009. Instead, they took a relatively simply issue with a simple solution and complicated it tenfold. On the surface, they look like they were only trying to save money, but in practice it seems like they were working diligently to aid the developer, who in the end now has to sit tight and hold off construction until the dust settles.Up to this point, the public hearings have been completed, deadlines have been met, and building plans have been reviewed by the Town of Brookhaven. The Town was reportedly ready to issue permits for the first phase of the project to begin once the sewering question, one of 22 other conditions outlined by the Town’s planning board as necessary for approval, was adequately addressed.Now, while the 21 other planning board conditions are moving along, the sewer question still remains unanswered and the project’s formal groundbreaking postponed.Regardless of whether or not the developer or the county caused the delay, the Ronkonkoma Hub project is now stopped dead in its tracks. Let’s hope a solution is coming soon to get everything moving again.Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco is a regular contributor to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.(Photo rendering: Tritec development)last_img read more

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Elon Musk’s SpaceX launches Crew-1 mission to begin new era for NASA

first_img– Advertisement – – Advertisement – CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida — SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket crackled through the sky Sunday evening, carrying the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft “Resilience” to orbit and marking the beginning of a new era of human spaceflight for NASA.The Crew-1 mission features the first SpaceX launch with a full crew, as NASA this week certified Elon Musk’s venture as the first private company with an operational system to launch astronauts to-and-from space. It’s a historic milestone for SpaceX, coming after years of work to develop and test its spacecraft to fly people regularly to orbit.“Resilience rises; not even gravity contains humanity when we explore as one for all,” NASA public affairs officer Marie Lewis said as the rocket left the launchpad. – Advertisement – NASA astronauts (right to left) Victor Glover, Shannon Walker, Mike Hopkins and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi in their SpaceX spacesuits during Crew-1 pre-launch preparations.NASA Crew Dragon Resilience is carrying NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover, Shannon Walker and Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi. The astronauts are headed for the International Space Station, expected to dock with the space station on Monday evening. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, with the Crew Dragon capsule, is launched carrying four astronauts on the first operational NASA commercial crew mission at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. November 15, 2020.Thom Baur | Reuters – Advertisement – Crew-1 also comes less than six months after the company’s historic final demonstration mission, which launched a pair of astronauts on a test flight in May and represented the company’s first launch with people on board. Subscribe to CNBC PRO for exclusive insights and analysis, and live business day programming from around the world.last_img read more

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Aklan local arrested for ‘illegal gun possession’

first_imgJimmy Ramos (second from right) sits handcuffed after he was arrested for illegal possession of firearm in Barangay Jalas, New Washington, Aklan last week. RADYO TODO/PN A .38-caliber revolver with four livebullets, another four live bullets of .45-caliber firearm, and an M26 handgrenade were recovered from 62-year-old resident Jimmy Ramos, a police reportshowed.  Ramos was caught on the strength of anarrest warrant last week, the report added. KALIBO, Aklan – A mechanic wasarrested for illegal possession of firearm in Barangay Jalas, New Washingtontown. Officers of the municipal policestation served the warrant issued by Executive Judge Bienvenido Barrios Jr.dated Oct. 11.   Ramos also faces a homicide charge,police said. The suspect was detained in the lockupcell of the New Washington police station, facing charges for violation ofRepublic Act 10591, or the Comprehensive Firearms and Ammunition Regulation Act.(Radyo Todo/PN)last_img read more

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