Month: June 2021

Will James takes over as RPA Chairman

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Gloucester prop Will James The Rugby Players’ Association today announced Gloucester second row, Will James, as the new RPA Chairman. Will takes over from former Bath prop, David Barnes, who after six years as Chairman becomes a full-time employee of The RPA as Rugby Manager, having had to retire from the game last season due to a neck injury.James will lead The RPA Management Board with Northampton Saint’s lock Christian Day being voted in as The RPA Vice-Chairman by the Player Representatives.RPA CEO, Damian Hopley, said: “It’s great news that Will has been elected as Chairman of The RPA Management Board. He has a very hard act to follow in David Barnes who did such a tremendous job as RPA Chairman and is the ideal person to assume the role of Rugby Manager within The RPA. The RPA Board has every confidence that Will will be equally as successful, he is extremely popular among the players and is respected by everyone within the game for his all-round professionalism. I very much look forward to working closely with him to make sure the players’ voice continues to be heard on all issues.”James spoke of his pride at having been elected as The RPA Chairman: “I’ve been the Gloucester Player Representative for three years now and I want to make a similar contribution to David Barnes, my predecessor, who has done a great job as Chairman up until this summer. It is a big role within The RPA and the game and a good opportunity for me to be able to give input into the work done by the Association. It’s an honour to have been elected RPA Chairman by my fellow Player Representatives.“Our role as Player Representatives at the clubs includes relaying issues to our RPA Player Development Managers and working with them to initiate education programmes for life after rugby, voicing player welfare issues and ensuring all benefits are filtered down to the members. In my position as RPA Chairman I will look to lead The RPA forward in what is an exciting time for the club game in England.”On his appointment as Vice-Chairman, Christian Day said: “I feel more senior this year having been on The RPA Management Board last year, so I felt comfortable stepping up and making my voice heard. *Player representatives on The RPA Management Board this season are:Bath – Sam Vesty, Exeter – Haydn Thomas, Gloucester – Will James, Harlequins – Olly Kohn, Leicester Tigers – Ben Woods, London Irish – Bob Casey, London Wasps – Ben Broster, Newcastle Falcons – Jeremy Manning, Northampton Saints – Christian Day, Sale Sharks – Sam Tuitupou, Saracens – Hugh Vyvyan, Worcester Warriors – Jake Abbott, Leeds Carnegie – Jonathan Pendlebury. TAGS: Gloucester “Rugby has changed dramatically over the last ten years. It used to be guys who went through university and got grades there before coming into rugby. Now many guys come in straight from school and that’s the only qualification they will ever have. I think it is crucial that The RPA provides player support after their rugby career. Also, rugby is a tough sport physically and some guys have to retire due to injury, so The RPA plays a huge role in helping players through The RPA Benevolent Fund as well.”The RPA Management Board is made up of Player Representatives from each of the 12 Aviva Premiership Clubs.*Matters discussed at the recent RPA Board Meeting in Birmingham included results of a recently commissioned RPA Player Medical Survey, career-ending insurance and “Social Responsibility” in the wake of unwelcome headlines at the Rugby World Cup. Discussions were also initiated around social media and the opportunity of players setting their own guidelines for the sensible use of social media.last_img read more

Read more…

England v South Africa: The Verdict

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Bok buster: Manu Tuilagi makes one of England’s five line breaks against South Africa. But it was to no avail as England fell to their tenth defeat in their past 11 November Tests against the southern hemisphere’s ‘big three’By Alan Pearey, Rugby World Deputy EditorIn a nutshellAN INTENSELY frustrating day for England, who on the balance of play did enough to earn a first win over the Springboks in 11 meetings. They had an edge in most areas and carved out what few try-scoring opportunities there were – but squandered every one. In addition, Toby Flood chose a bad day to miss a couple of straightforward penalty kicks.Against Australia, England lost to a try with more than a hint of blocking and a forward pass. Against the Boks they lost to a ludicrous try that came in the only spell of the match when the visitors threatened the English line.But don’t feel too sorry for England – this was a South Africa side shorn of Bismarck du Plessis, Schalk Burger, Juan Smith, Tendai Mtawarira, Pierre Spies, Frans Steyn and Bryan Habana. England were much closer to full strength and had the advantage of home territory and freshness. England are a work-in-progress but they should be winning games like this.Key momentIn such testing conditions, there was barely a whiff of a try from orthodox means. Instead, it took something truly freakish to decide the outcome: Toby Flood’s fly-hack ricocheted off JP Pietersen in a gentle arc towards the goal-line, where Tom Wood, facing backwards, fumbled to present Willem Alberts with his third try in four outings against England. “It was the crucial moment,” said Stuart Lancaster, “because a ten-point gap (6-16) on a day like that left us having to climb a mountain.”Mismatch: Etzebeth and Ben Youngs tangleStar man: Eben EtzebethThe 21-year-old Springbok lock was as colossal as his 6ft 8in frame, making 17 tackles and two turnovers in an inspired performance. When Tom Youngs came to his brother’s aid during a set-to between Ben Youngs and Etzebeth, I don’t think the young Bok even noticed – he was that pumped up. He has that look of a 100-cap player about him.It was a day for the big men because Joe Launchbury also impressed on his first Test start, while Geoff Parling produced his best performance in open play for England, repeatedly carrying the ball and more than matching the physicality of the Boks in the tight. The lineout creaked but no surprise there against the world’s best exponents – South Africa lost just one lineout in three Tests on this tour.Room for improvementI’m not one of those about to slate Chris Robshaw for his decision-making – he is a young man learning the art of Test-match captaincy (this was his 11th cap).His decision to go kick at goal when England faced a four-point deficit with two minutes left has divided opinion. In my book it was the wrong call. There was exactly 60 seconds remaining when the Boks restarted and had they kicked long, as they should have done, England would have had to work the ball some 80 metres – to get within drop-goal range – from one play. Replacements not used: Elton Jantjies, Jaco Taute, Lwazi Mvovo.Referee: Nigel Owens (Wales)center_img Had they kicked for the corner and gone for the 5m lineout, the odds would still have been heavily against them, but an English pack at Twickenham should back itself to drive over from close range, or create enough mayhem to bring a try down the line.In quotesWinnersSpringbok coach Heyneke Meyer: “The outstanding thing for me is that we’ve had only three losses this year; we started it as No 4 in the world and have ended it as No 2. We had ten superstars away for this tour and this was an inexperienced side. We’re not used to playing these conditions and the great thing is how the youngsters have adapted. The next World Cup will be here and this is how you win trophies, by grinding things out. We’ve added a defence on this tour and the team has a long way.”LosersEngland coach Stuart Lancaster: “The physicality was a big step-up from the Australia game. We asked the players to make that step and they delivered. The try was pretty unlucky for us but it’s how you react – have you got the character to come back against the second-best team in the world? And our response showed you can’t question the character of this team. We didn’t win but there was enough there from a young team to give us confidence for the long term. We won’t go into the All Blacks game worrying that we won’t get a performance.”Top statsEngland had 60% of the territory and 58% of the ball. They conceded almost half the number of penalties (nine to the Boks’ 17) and made 433 metres with ball in hand against the Boks’ 169. There were five line breaks by England to South Africa’s one. If only they had kicked all their goals…ENGLAND: Alex Goode; Chris Ashton, Manu Samoa, Brad Barritt, Mike Brown; Toby Flood (Owen Farrell 6-10, 45), Ben Youngs (Danny Care 67); Alex Corbisiero (Mako Vunipola 53), Tom Youngs (David Paice 67), Dan Cole (David Wilson 75), Joe Launchbury (Mauritz Botha 72), Geoff Parling, Tom Wood (James Haskell 53), Chris Robshaw (capt), Ben Morgan.Replacement not used: Jonathan Joseph.SOUTH AFRICA: Zane Kirchner; JP Pietersen, Juan de Jongh, Jean de Villiers (capt), Francois Hougaard; Pat Lambie, Ruan Pienaar; Gurthrö Steenkamp (Heinke van der Merwe 61), Adriaan Strauss (Schalk Brits 74), Jannie du Plessis (Pat Cilliers ht), Eben Etzebeth (Flip van der Merwe 69), Juandré Kruger, Francois Louw, Willem Alberts (Marcell Coetzee 56), Duane Vermeulen.last_img read more

Read more…

RFU Championship: The battle for promotion

first_imgUndoubtedly, Falcons are favourites to continue their impressive form. Steadied by Jimmy Gopperth (off to Leinster in the summer) and driven by a obtrusive pack, they will not be bowled over by any other team in their league. But they may be looking a bit too far ahead.The Championship playoffs can tend to get ignored, particularly with the ups, downs and vomit inducing spins of the of the Premiership survival scrap. The will-they-won’t-they drama of London Welsh’s bid to stay up was offset against upturns in form from Sale Sharks and London Irish and all of a sudden it was assumed that Newcastle would win promotion.They are strong favourites, but nothing is ever certain in professional sport.Gregarious Grenoble: The Alps club celebrate toppling ToulonJust look at the goings-on in France over the last season. No one expected Grenoble to put up much resistance, but they strung together powerful performances and were near unbeatable at home. They topple Top 14 leaders Toulon at the weekend and they are safe this season. All of this despite being the champions of the Pro D2 the season before.This year Oyonnax have earned automatic promotion to the top table in France, replacing one of Stade Mantois and Agen. The other promotion spot will go to the winner of the playoffs between the second, third, fourth and fifth placed teams. Roaring up: Jimmy Gopperth celebrates one of many Newcastle Falcons tries in the Championship this seasonBy Alan DymockTHE RHETORIC of battles is always used in professional rugby, as if the weeks of weights and hours of Xbox were shared experiences with servicemen and women garrisoned around the globe.The battle of the breakdown, the scrap at the set piece and more commonly the fight for the title and the relegation dog-fight. Rugby, it is always coloured, is an endless skirmish with the ugliest attrition being seen as the basement dwellers struggle to climb the stairs back to the moneyed environs of the Aviva Premiership.Eyeing promotion: Falcons Dean RichardsHowever, the most intense and indeed exhilarating stramash as we head into the season’s end may not come from title semi-finals or cup deciders or even one-off league deciders, but with the Play-Offs deciding who bursts into the top leagues next term.With Dean Richards and his Newcastle Falcons the image conjured up in the last few weeks is one of the old England No 8 standing on a trading floor, snapping up players on the cheap and strengthening his club’s portfolio. He is buying low and aiming high.What many forget, however, is that Newcastle are not in the Promised Land yet.The Falcons have run away with the league, only losing once all year – the opening game of the season to Bristol – and grumpily denying opposition from scoring too many points against them. Now they face a playoff semi-final with fourth placed Leeds Carnegie and if they win that they have a final against the winner of Nottingham versus Bedford Blues. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS There are two more rounds left with La Rochelle, Brive, Pau and Aurillac currently occupying the hot spots. Yet Lyon and Tarbes could still, realistically, snatch a place late on if circumstance is kind to them.While most eyes will be on the title playoffs in England and France, spare a thought for the blood-spattered warriors trying to claw their way into those celebrated leagues. Their rumbles may just be that little bit more life-changing. <> at Memorial Stadium on September 2, 2012 in Bristol, England. last_img read more

Read more…

Part 2: Locating a club and getting kitted out

first_img This is a Rugby World advertorial.In the second of a four-part series, in conjunction with Microsoft Windows 10, Rugby World welcomes #therugbybeginnerWEEK TWOIt’s a grey, damp, chilly Autumnal evening outside Chateau Eason. Inside, however, things are looking up. I’d made the decision to join a local rugby club. First up, however, I needed to find an establishment that would take on a rugby virgin of modest size, who was well into his thirties and never kicked a rugby ball before. Surely it couldn’t be that hard, could it?With a mug of hot tea in hand I fired up the Microsoft Surface Pro 3 and settled in for some serious research.As I mentioned in my opening blog, we’ve recently just moved to a new area so I needed get my bearings first. I used Cortana (Microsoft’s smart personal assistant for Windows 10) to find me a rugby club. Instantly up popped a list of clubs, maps, distances and contact details with links to Southend RFC and Westcliff RFC sitting proudly at the top of the page.Earlier in the week, when taking my son to his weekly swimming lesson, I’d noticed a fellow dad wearing a Westcliff rugby club branded t-shirt, a sign from the rugby gods, surely?It was enough encouragement for me to take the plunge. It didn’t hurt that at the top of their homepage, emblazoned in capital letters was: ‘NEW PLAYERS WELCOME’. Not thinking too much about the actual consequences I picked up the phone and made the call to find out more and introduce myself.I was told training was on Tuesdays, and all new players were more than welcome. Dave Cole, the Fourth XV team captain of Westcliff Bulldogs even said there was no way I’d be getting smashed in training – “at least not yet”, he added with a big smile. I chuckled back nervously. *Catch up next week for Kevin’s first ever training session #therugbybeginner LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS After Dave further reassured me – he’s probably smooth-talked many rookies over the years – I was even more pumped to be starting my rugby journey, even though I was still glued to a comfy armchair.With my head buried into the last few remaining unpacked boxes from the house move, it quickly became apparent I needed the necessary rugby clobber. Even my ancient football boots were in tatters, ahem, from all the goals I’d scored!Dave also mentioned that it would be worth buying a gum-shield and some bodyarmour and a headguard was optional. For training some baselayers and midlayers would also come in handy as winter set in.I grabbed the Surface Pro 3 for some rugby retail therapy, browsing web stores using separate tabs and Snap view meant I could easily surf around and compare prices. Gum shield. Tick. Boots. Tick. Training tops. Tick. It was all coming together.After a few final online purchases and a trip to my local rugby shop, I was finally ready to put my body on the line. The saying, “all the gear, no idea” sprang to mind.*Gulp!*. There was no turning back now… Our blogger Kevin Eason prepares himself for full-contactlast_img read more

Read more…

30 Minutes with… Referee Wayne Barnes

first_img Do you have any nicknames?At uni I was known as ‘Wurzel’ as I’m from the West Country. Whenever I warm up and hear, “Hey, Wurzel!” I know an old uni mate is in the crowd.What position did you play then? 
I was a non-tackling back-row. I was inspired to try and make big hits but really, at 6ft 3in and 90kg (14st 2lb), I was there to be used in the lineout.What’s your guilty pleasure?The biggest one is musicals. I love West End shows. So does Mike Catt. When he was at the RFU and we were both at an event, you’d find us in a corner practicing a number from Les Mis or something.Who’d be your dream three dinner party guests?I’d say Michael Ball or Alfie Boe, whoever is free on the night, for the entertainment factor. Barack Obama, to find out what the last eight years have been like. Then I’d invite someone for my wife Polly to talk to as she hates musicals but likes fashion, like Victoria Beckham.In the spotlight: Alfie Boe on the West End stage with Katherine Jenkins. Photo: Getty ImagesDo you have any bugbears?Firstly, whistling – and this is from a ref! When someone walks past whistling, it’s like they are saying: “I am much happier than you are.” And the other thing is litter.Are you busy off the field?I still work as a barrister specialising in bribery and corruption, and actually another thing I dislike is people running in a suit – for a train or something like that. You’re not James Bond! I work every week, with the number of days depending on my rugby commitments.Who’s the funniest official?We’re a close bunch – Nigel Owens, myself and Craig Joubert all came through the sevens together. The public don’t get to know the refs like we do and the likes of Romain Poite and George Clancy have a really great sense of humour – and are fantastic in the referees’ court session!Funny man: Nigel Owens chats to Ireland’s fly-half Johnny Sexton. Photo: Getty ImagesDo you have any phobias? I don’t think refs need to be remembered, just respected by peers. We’re not there to be popular. I try to communicate as much as I can on the pitch. Hopefully I’d be respected by players too.This article first appeared in the March 2017 issue of Rugby World. For the latest subscription offers, click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Man in the middle: Wayne Barnes is set to officiate his ninety-fifth international this tournament (Getty Images) center_img I’m petrified of heights and our offices are on 
the 25th floor of the Shard!What’s the funniest thing seen on the pitch?Once, at Leicester, a spectator had had a few too many and ran on the pitch. Tom Croft came up to me and said: “Barnesy, you’ve got to stop bringing your family to games.”What’s your most embarrassing moment?I once got smashed by Ian Keatley of Munster. He almost took my head off. It got a big cheer from the crowd.If you could be anyone in rugby, who would it be?If you look at the young refs now, someone like Craig Maxwell-Keys is fit as a fiddle without having to train very hard. As for players, I’ve always had a soft spot for the front row. Maybe Richard Hibbard. He’s a nice guy, a pretty talented player and he has those long flowing locks!Blond ambition: Richard Hibbard in the thick of it for Gloucester. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s the worst job you’ve had?There used to be a factory in the Forest of Dean where they made Ribena. I used to squash the berries into a pulp. It was shift work and if you went in after a few the night before, you’d get the fumes from the berries…What are your goals away from rugby?I’ve always wanted to play the piano properly. I can read a bit of sheet music, but I’d love to sit down at the end of a night out and spark up Sweet Caroline.How would you like to be remembered? Find out what makes referee Wayne Barnes tick off the fieldlast_img read more

Read more…

Special Offer: Three issues of Rugby World magazine for £5

first_img Special Offer: Three issues of Rugby World magazine for £5Want to find out more about rugby’s biggest names? Want to know the story behind the news? Want to see the game’s big issues dissected and debated? Rugby World magazine brings you all this and more – and with a subscription it will be delivered direct to your door.Take out a subscription to Rugby World magazine right now and you can get three issues for £5. Then it’s just £22.99 every six months – a saving of 30%.You’ll enjoy the luxury of home delivery and never miss an issue. Plus, you get all this brilliant content…Exclusive player accessRugby World magazine takes you closer to the game’s biggest stars than ever before with our exclusive interviews. Our journalists get the players’ views on the major issues in rugby and find out what drives them to succeed as well as what makes them tick off the pitch. We bring you the detail you want to know, be that discovering how players are improving their game or taking to the skies with those who also have pilot’s licences.THREE ISSUES OF RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE FOR £5Behind-the-scenes insightReaders get the detail they crave as we go behind the scenes to get the inside story on what goes on in the team environment. We also have technical insight from coach Sean Holley, who analyses teams and players as well as providing advice on what your club could do. Professional players offer tips on specific facets of the game that you can employ, too, while ‘The Secret Player’ gives eye-opening detail on life as a pro. Hard-hitting opinionWith myriad talking points in the sport, Rugby World delivers the story behind the news. Our comprehensive investigations highlight all sides of the big issues and top-quality columnists like Stuart Barnes, Stephen Jones and Mark Evans give their verdict on rugby’s hot topics, from the salary cap to selection. We also provide a platform for players and readers to share their opinions on the latest happenings in the game.Here are all the details of the three issues of Rugby World for £5 subsciption offer, which is available in the UK for print and digital subscribers. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Big savings on a magazine subscription Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Read more…

Archbishop of Cape Town’s letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, January 10, 2012 at 5:17 pm A disturbing, highly-out-of-context quotation of scripture does nothing to support the concept of a covenant, and, to those who recognize this, a shockingly underwhelming letter. In the study of Philosophy, this technique is sometimes called “appeal to authority,” and is often quoted in place of fact. Those of us who pray for unity will, sadly, not feel supported by this letter. Those who pray for diversity will, sadly, not be swayed otherwise. Tags Comments are closed. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Stuart Lauters says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID January 10, 2012 at 6:33 pm It is apparent that Archbishop Thabo, as well as others urging adoption of the Anglican Covenant, are having not inconsiderable difficulty with the notion of living in tension which is to be expected in a situation such as Anglicanism adapting to local needs while being based on a shared heritage of worship in lieu of specific understandings of church doctrines. It is also obvious that he and other like minded individuals would possibly feel more at home in a hierarchal situation similar to that of the Roman Catholic Church where provincial autonomy is not an issue.I am not writing this in a spirt of, to paraphrase, We have no need of those who see the Anglican Covenant as currently written as the only way through our difficulties. What I am writing is that we must be prepared to commit to continuing dialog on the issue or issues that precipitated the Covenant in the first place even if it means the dialog must continue after most if not all of the current participants in the debate are long gone. Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Donald Jack Newsom says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET [Office of the Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town] The Archbishop of Cape Town, the Most Rev. Thabo Makgoba, has written to the archbishop of Canterbury in response to his Advent letter to the primates of the Anglican Communion and moderators of the United Churches. In his letter, Makgoba reflects on the Anglican Covenant as “necessary” for Anglicans “in recalling us to ourselves.” He argues that the Covenant must be considered on the basis of its ability to help Anglicans recover their true vocation within God’s One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.  This includes growing more fully into the life of “mutual responsibility and interdependence” which the 1963 Toronto Congress identified and from which the Communion has since drifted.  Recalling how the Communion was able to stand in solidarity with Southern Africa in the past, he sees the Covenant as being an effective vehicle for more fully expressing Anglicanism’s theological, pastoral and missional understandings and callings.Therefore, he says, it is a mistake to focus too narrowly either on the disagreements around human sexuality, or on seeking legally or structurally based solutions to current Anglican difficulties.  The identity of the Communion’s member churches “should not principally be conveyed through legal prisms, whether of some form of centralising authority, or of Provinces’ constitutions and canon law which must be ‘safeguarded’ from external ‘interference.’” The Covenant also ensures that the Communion cannot “rest content with the sort of ‘autonomous’ ecclesial units that implicitly privilege juridical unilateralism over autonomy more rightly understood as the growing organic interdependence that must inevitably mark the living body of Christ” and so is necessary in taking the Communion beyond the context in which current difficulties could arise and be pursued so acrimoniously.Though recognizing the reality of human fallibility, the Communion should look to “the salvific work of Jesus Christ” and put its trust in him, rather than appearing to seek structural or legal solutions to its difficulties.  He sees the Covenant as a means for doing this, since it “places God’s vision for God’s Church and God’s world center-stage; and then invites us to live into this as our ultimate and overriding context and calling.” The provisions of the Covenant – which neither create new structures nor interfere in Provinces’ life – should be understood, he argues, in terms of “the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus” (Rom 8:2).  Covenanting together does not mean legal restrictions, but instead, says Makgoba, “constraining ourselves through the same sort of mutuality of love St Paul had in mind when he wrote ‘all things are lawful but not all things are beneficial – all things are lawful but not all things build up’” (1 Cor 10:23). The archbishop encourages those who are daunted by the challenge of living together in Christ by noting that “St Paul is under no illusions as to how difficult it can be,” in illustrating this by the mutual incomprehension of seeing and hearing within a human body.  He also points to Southern Africa’s experience of bridging vast differences in the past and today.Finally, he encourages those Provinces of the Anglican Communion which have yet to do so, to adopt the Covenant.  He says “echoing St Paul, we affirm that we cannot say ‘We have no need of you’ (1 Cor 12:21).”  He concludes by urging “all of you, as partners covenanting to go forward in newness of life together, are ‘indispensable’” (v.22) to our own ability to grow in faithful obedience to what we believe is God’s vocation for all Anglicans, and ultimately towards the fullness of his vision for his One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.The full text of Archbishop Makgoba’s letter follows below.My dear brother in ChristWith love and prayers, I greet you this Epiphany-tide in the name of Christ, made manifest as Lord and Saviour of all.Reading your Advent letter again, in the quieter period following Christmas, underlined the particular gift that the Communion has the potential to be, as together we share the message that Jesus Christ is truly ‘the Light to all nations’, in whatever troubles the world faces.  This was vividly evident in the visit I made with you to Zimbabwe.  The capacity to act together – across old divides of colonisers and colonised, and contemporary differences of rich and poor, north and south, through God’s gift of unity to the Communion – gives considerable force to our joint proclamation of Christ as the Light of the World.  We cannot put in jeopardy our ability to spread the Gospel in this way.  In everything from standing in solidarity with Bishop Chad of Harare and his clergy and people, to contributing effectively to debate on reshaping international economic structures in ways that are more just, we need to do our utmost in ensuring God’s word is effectively expressed in and to his world.Support during the apartheid era to us in Southern Africa from across the Anglican world demonstrated how great a difference the Communion can make:  from the pastoral care such encouragement brought, through to its impact in helping us speak truth to power.  Our theological convictions that God had called us to a particular expression of common life within the body of Christ thus bore both pastoral and missional fruit during the struggle years.  Enjoying an identity that has dimensions beyond the borders of our Province has continued to empower us to speak courageously and truthfully in all circumstances – for we believe that, as in the past, if any of us are adversely touched in any way, the whole Communion is touched.Yet such mutuality cannot be taken for granted, and indeed, the way that our disagreements on human sexuality have played out suggests we had already begun to drift from that particular sense of belonging to God and to each other, within the wider body of Christ, which was so strong in Southern Africa’s great time of need.  It seems to me that the Covenant is entirely necessary, in recalling us to ourselves.  Only in this way can we continue to grow in bearing this rich fruit that comes from living the life which is both God’s gift and God’s calling.  This is how we have seen the Covenant, and so the Anglican Church of Southern Africa has taken the first step towards adopting it, with the concluding stage of ratification on the agenda for our next Provincial Synod in 2013).Conscious of this, I offer these reflections on the Covenant, and its potential – if we are prepared to work wholeheartedly within its framework, trusting God and one another – to help us grow more fully into our calling as faithful Anglicans, faithful Christians, faithful members of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.  This is the proper context for our discerning of truth, our pursuit of unity, and our understanding of (and, indeed, our disagreeing over) how they relate.  It concerns me greatly, therefore, that, from what I read on line and elsewhere, and from the responses I received to the article I wrote for The Living Church last year, too much of the debate around the Covenant seems to have lost sight of this as our true context.  There appears to be a too narrowly blinkered focus on questions not primarily directed towards growing as faithful and obedient members together of the body of Christ, of which he is the one true head, with all that this entails.Arguments that the Covenant is ‘not fit for purpose’ (for example through ‘going too far’ or ‘not going far enough’) are too often predicated upon an inadequate model of ‘being church’ and what it means to live as members of the body of Christ.  Implicit, it seems to me, is a diminished view of God’s grace, God’s redemptive power and purposes, and God’s vision and calling upon his people and his Church, and so of Anglicanism’s place within these.  Our sense of who we are, and called to become, should not principally be conveyed through legal prisms, whether of some form of centralising authority, or of Provinces’ constitutions and canon law which must be ‘safeguarded’ from external ‘interference’.  Nor should we primarily look to structural or legal solutions to our undeniable difficulties or for regulating our relationships.Scripture reminds us that solving our problems ultimately rests not on our efforts but on the salvific work of Jesus Christ.  He is the one who can make the Church faithful and obedient, holy and loving.  For he ‘loved the Church and gave himself up for her, in order to make her holy by cleansing her with the washing of water by the word, so as to present the church to himself in splendour, without a spot or wrinkle or anything of the kind – yes, so that she may be holy and without blemish’ (Eph 5:25-7).  Do we truly believe and trust in this promise of God for ourselves?  Do we truly believe and trust in this promise of God at work in the lives of other Anglicans?  Of course we must work with the reality of human failings, but surely we should debate and behave and order our lives on the basis of the overriding sure and certain hope of God’s redemption in Christ.Seeing the Covenant merely as a product of disagreements over human sexuality, or in terms of whether or not it provides particular solutions to these disagreements, is therefore to miss the fundamental point.  As I noted earlier, it seems that, especially in the acrimonious and bitter ways we have often handled our differences, disunity over sexuality was symptomatic of a deeper malaise within our common life.  I suspect this reflects a failure to take seriously the commitments to ‘Mutual Responsibility and Interdependence in the Body of Christ’ made at the 1963 Toronto Congress.  We said then ‘our unity in Christ, expressed in our full communion, is the most profound bond among us, in all our political and racial and cultural diversity’ and in consequence, ‘our need is … to understand how God has led us, through the sometimes painful history of our time, to see the gifts of freedom and communion in their great terms, and to live up to them.’  The Congress warned ‘if we are not responsible stewards of what Christ has given us, we will lose even what we have.’  But it appears we have not been responsible, taking one another for granted, being content to drift apart, allowing ourselves to be preoccupied with our own concerns, so that when differences arose we had lost our ability to connect and work through them in love together.Therefore, to ask if the Covenant is ‘fit for purpose’ should be to ask whether it helps us address the foundational question of growing together in faithful obedience within the body of Christ.  And it seems to me that, above all else, the Covenant does indeed do this, in the way it places God’s vision for God’s Church and God’s world centre-stage; and then invites us to live into this as our ultimate and overriding context and calling.  It does not create new structures or authorities, nor alters constitutions; and scope for individual action remains considerable (as your letter underlines).  But nor will it allow us to rest content with the sort of ‘autonomous’ ecclesial units that implicitly privilege juridical unilateralism over autonomy more rightly understood as the growing organic interdependence that must inevitably mark the living body of Christ.  As ‘Covenant’, it propels us towards understanding and expressing its legal provisions in terms of ‘the law of the Spirit* of life in Christ Jesus’ (Rom 8:2); constraining ourselves through the same sort of mutuality of love St Paul had in mind when he wrote ‘all things are lawful but not all things are beneficial – all things are lawful but not all things build up’ (1 Cor 10:23).  It thus invites us – invites God’s Spirit – to breathe new and redemptive life into the Communion’s existing frameworks.Where we are apprehensive about our ability to ‘lead a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, making every effort to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace’ (Eph 4:1-2), then it is reassuring to note that St Paul is under no illusions as to how difficult it can be to relate to those who are different within Christ’s body.  Members who are otherwise completely mutually incomprehensible (as seeing is to the ear, hearing to the eye – 1 Cor 12:17) can nonetheless hold together, if they can recognise that Christ lives in the other.  This is something we learnt in the past in Southern Africa, and continue to experience across vast ethnic, cultural, political and socio-economic differences.  More than this, we have found that, even in painful difference, we are better able to discern God’s truth together than apart.  All this is why we hold together in ongoing debate across the whole spectrum of views on human sexuality – we do not agree, and our differences are sharp and painful, but we will not turn our backs on brothers and sisters in Christ and instead will keep wrestling together.  This is why we are proceeding towards adopting the Covenant.Finally, this is why we hold in our prayers those Provinces, including the Church of England, who are still considering the Covenant.  The Communion, and all it has the potential to be and become, under God, matters.  Echoing St Paul, we affirm that we cannot say ‘We have no need of you’ (1 Cor 12:21).  Rather, all of you, as partners covenanting to go forward in newness of life together, are ‘indispensable’ (v.22) to our own ability to grow in faithful obedience to what we believe is God’s vocation for all Anglicans, and ultimately towards the fullness of his vision for his One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.Yours in the service of Christ+Thabo Cape Town Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Posted Jan 10, 2012 Archbishop of Canterbury This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ William Wilcox says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA January 12, 2012 at 8:23 am I honor the intent of Archbishop Makgoba’s letter and his reflections on the importance of the Communion theologically, spiritually and for shared ministry. The Church in South Africa has experience of the power of Communion-wide connections that those of us in North America can’t know in the same way. That said, I remain unconvinced the Covenant as proposed would, in fact, strengthen those vital bonds the Archbishop writes of so movingly. The first three sections are a good expression of the theological grounding of the shared life and ministry of the Communion. But the fourth section with its various quasi-legal procedures seems designed not, as the Archbishop writes, to help us “hold together in ongoing debate across the whole spectrum of views on human sexuality”, but rather to short-circuit that (and other) challenging but needed debates within the Communion. It also risks creating a series of adversarial struggles rather than deepening of life in Christ. We can continue to do the latter by shared worship, prayer and ministry without the Covenant. I share the Archbishop’s desire for a more deeply connected Communion. I don’t think the Covenant is the right means to that end. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments (4) Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Archbishop of Cape Town’s letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury ‘A necessary Covenant’ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Africa, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service January 10, 2012 at 7:35 pm Clearly, different cultural perspectives and proclivities will continue over time. The Covenent is , presently, the sole inclusive, rational, and Scripturally-based approach for us, as individual Anglicants, to live into our confirmed Baptismal Covenants. I am convinced that we, the “fannies in the pews,” will feel that The Body is protected, civility in disagreement restored, and, eventually, unity restored to the Anglican Communion. I can not but agree completely with Archbishop Thabo! Jack Zamboni says: last_img read more

Read more…

New Zealand clerics seek an official measure of child poverty

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By David CramptonPosted Sep 11, 2012 Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Ecumenical News International] Child poverty in New Zealand is drawing attention from several denominations after a recent report outlined legislative plans to help children through tax and welfare changes.The New Zealand government has cited difficulties with measuring child poverty, due to some families’ fluctuating income levels, but clergy from seven denominations said accurate measurement is urgently needed.“It is essential that this is done,” the Salvation Army’s Major Campbell Roberts told ENInews. “Otherwise you don’t know what you are dealing with.”Roberts also said he feels churches aren’t doing enough to address poverty. “I think we could be doing more. We don’t want there to be any excuse for a child not to get appropriate housing or health care.”He was a member of the Expert Advisory Group that issued a report titled Issues and Options on Aug. 28 that suggested the legislative remedies. The group was formed last March by the Children’s Commissioner, the office that oversees child welfare in New Zealand. After a month’s public feedback, the Commissioner will issue a final report to the government in December.Roberts also advises Salvation Army Commander Donald Bell, who considers measurement will provide a true picture of poverty. “With meaningful goals in place, our policymakers can implement practical changes and measure outcomes that make a real and significant difference to children currently living in poverty,” Bell said.The denominations calling for accurate measurement, besides the Salvation Army, were the Anglican, Baptist, Catholic, Methodist, Presbyterian and Assemblies of God churches.They called the level of child poverty in New Zealand “unacceptably high.” The Commissioner has reported that in 2006/07, 230,000, or 22 percent, of New Zealand children lived in households with incomes below the 60 percent median income poverty line, after taking housing costs into account.Catholic Archbishop John Dew said he believes clerics have a collective responsibility to strive to do the best for children. “We owe it to our children to give them a voice in this discussion and the decisions that will follow.”“Addressing poverty is about being central to God’s heart,” said New Zealand’s newest Anglican diocesan bishop, Wellington’s Justin Duckworth, who was consecrated June 30.Along with his family and his archbishop, David Moxon, Duckworth will be “living below the line” from Sept. 24-28, on NZ$2.25 (US$1.25) a day — the International Extreme Poverty Line as defined by the World Bank. The challenge is a brainchild of the Global Poverty Project, which creates awareness of extreme poverty. Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Children, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Zealand clerics seek an official measure of child poverty Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Anglican Communion, Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Poverty & Hunger Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 last_img read more

Read more…

Antje Jackelén elected Church of Sweden’s first female archbishop

first_imgAntje Jackelén elected Church of Sweden’s first female archbishop November 15, 2013 at 12:28 pm What a breath of fresh air for the world Christian churches. The Episcopal Church, USA set thepresidence for allowing women to lead an episcopal college with Bishop Schori. Iceland came second. Then, Norway has a woman presiding bishop. Now, the ELCA (USA) also has moved in the same direction. Maybe next year (2014) the Church of England would consider consecration of bishops soon.Per Raymond Gallie October 22, 2013 at 10:20 pm Right: not gender. Hopefully the news will be about a variety of sexual orientations and the gifts for ministry which leaders bring: that gives affirmation and hope to younger folks who seek to serve. Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Tags Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Women’s Ministry Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Bishop Antje Jackelén. Photo: LWF/S. Gallay[Lutheran World Federation] The Lutheran World Federation (LWF) has congratulated Lund Bishop Antje Jackelén upon her election as the next archbishop of the Church of Sweden.In a letter to Jackelén, LWF General Secretary the Rev. Martin Junge expressed gladness that the Swedish church had elected a leader who would bring to her new role “rootedness in the global church” and understanding of “the richness and diversity of the global Lutheran communion.”Junge said, “Your gifts of theological understanding, pastoral care and discernment, and principled leadership will be put to good use in this new chapter of your ministry.”In the Oct. 15 election in Uppsala, Jackelén received 55.9 percent of the votes cast in the first round to choose a successor to outgoing Archbishop Anders H. Wejryd. She will become the first woman to head the Swedish church.Jackelén is a member of the LWF Council, and serves on its Committee for Theology and Ecumenical Relations. The general secretary underlined her leadership role in the LWF governing body and other international settings, as well as her experience while studying and teaching in Germany and the United States.The LWF celebrates Jackelén’s election also as an affirmation “that one of LWF’s gifts to the global church is the commitment to the full participation of women and men in church and society,” Junge noted. Still, he expressed his hope that the day would come “when the news is not going to be anymore the gender of the elected leaders, but the special gifts he or she brings to the ministry.”Jackelén studied at the universities of Tübingen (Germany) and Uppsala and Lund (Sweden), and taught systematic theology at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, USA. After her ordination in 1980, she served as a parish pastor in Stockholm and Lund, and became the Lund diocese bishop in 2007. She will be installed as Church of Sweden Archbishop in June 2014, succeeding Wejryd, who has led the church since 2006.Church of Sweden is LWF’s largest member church, with over 6.5 million members. October 30, 2013 at 7:58 pm I think its great. Is she single? I’m Baptist, but I’m ecumenical. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Eddie Hall says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted Oct 20, 2013 Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel October 1, 2015 at 5:43 pm Prayers for ChildrenPublished by Donna Noble Gibson · 23 hrs · Edited ·Oct. 15. 2015 As a global family, we are united in care and concern for all children, their families, their caretakers. The family is the basic unit of society where children learn love,values, and social skills. Today we see the breakup of families because of war, migration, corruption resulting in poverty, impossible living conditions…….In shared humanity and care, let us protect, pray, bless and direct our positive thought and energy to children and families within our world and our community. Pope Francis said: “A little bit of mercy makes the world less cold and more just.” Mercy means caring for our children and families Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Per Raymond Gallie says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (4) Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA People, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ecumenical & Interreligious, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Jay Woods says: Donna Noble Gibson says: Anglican Communion, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

Read more…

Video: UBE youth Morenike Oyebode talks about church involvement

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Episcopal News Service] Morenike Oyebode, president of the youth group at St. George’s Episcopal Church in Hempstead, New York, attended the annual Union of Black Episcopalians conference to participate in the worship services, but also she was looking for ways to get more young people involved in the church. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Jul 2, 2014 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Tags Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Video: UBE youth Morenike Oyebode talks about church involvement Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Video The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Read more…