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Funding boost announced for social enterprises in Donegal

first_imgDonegal Local Development CLG has welcomed a new Small Capital Grants Scheme for Social Enterprises which will see a €1 million fund being awarded to 100 Social Enterprises throughout the country.DLDC is inviting Donegal’s social enterprises to apply for the grants, which will range between €2,000 and €15,000 and will be provided for equipment, repairs or refurbishments which will enable social enterprises to improve their service. The scheme is an initiative under the National Social Enterprise Policy for Ireland 2018-2022, which the Minister published in July, and will be administered through the Local Development Companies. CEO of DLDC, Padraic Fingleton said “Along with all Local Development Companies throughout Ireland, our staff have been supporting social enterprises through SICAP, LEADER and other programmes for many years and this new fund will give the sector a significant boost, particularly by assisting early stage projects that have huge capacity for positive social impact.” The application form and guidelines for applicants are available on the DLDC Website at the following link http://www.dldc.org/2019/10/23/donegal-local-development-clg-announce-funding-boost-for-social-enterprises-in-donegal/Announcing the scheme, Minister Ring said: “The new small capital grants scheme will support over 100 social enterprises through funding of €1 million from the Dormant Accounts Fund. It will provide grants of between €2,000 and €15,000 to enable social enterprises to make small equipment purchases, or to carry out refurbishments to their premises to help them to improve their service delivery.“The scheme will be of particular interest to smaller or start-up social enterprises which do not necessarily have the capacity to compete for larger grants.” The Minister continued: “I am pleased that the Local Development Companies have agreed to partner with my Department to deliver this scheme. The Local Development Companies provide grassroots support to social enterprises all around the country and are well placed to administer the fund.”Full details of the Small Capital Grants Scheme for Social Enterprises, including Application Form and Guidelines, are available by contacting Margaret Larkin, DLDC, Mail: [email protected]  Tel: 0749127056All applications must be received by Donegal Local Development CLG by 3pm on Friday November 11th. Whilst DLDC will administer the fund, all decisions on grant awards will be made by the Department of Rural & Community Development. It is expected that applicants will be notified of the results of their application by the Department of Rural and Community Development by December 11th. The country’s 49 Local Development Companies are the primary support network for the social enterprises in Ireland with over 40 staff dedicated working with the sector nationwide. DLDC will provide assistance with the application process to any group that wishes to apply. Earlier this year Minister Michael Ring of the Department of Rural and Community Development launched the very first National Social Enterprise Policy for Ireland 2019 – 2022.  The policy defined a social enterprise as one whose objective is to achieve a social, societal or environmental impact, rather than maximising profit for its owners or shareholders. It pursues its objectives by trading on an ongoing basis through the provision of goods and/or services and by reinvesting surpluses into achieving social objectives.For further information, contact Margaret Larkin, [email protected]  0749127056Funding boost announced for social enterprises in Donegal was last modified: October 24th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:DLDCSocial Enterpriseslast_img read more

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Marshawn Lynch reportedly retires for good after 11 seasons

first_imgMarshawn Lynch is calling it a career – again – as ESPN’s Adam Schefter reported Wednesday morning that Beast Mode doesn’t plan to play football again.Lynch first retired after the 2015 season simply by tweeting a picture of cleats hanging from a telephone pole wire, only to return with his hometown Oakland Raiders in 2017.Lynch played 21 games over two seasons for the Raiders, running for 1,267 yards and 10 touchdowns on 4.3 yards per carry.He turned 33 on Monday and is coming off groin …last_img

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Putting

first_img17 August 2004A businessman from the Western Cape is set to take a traditional South African meal, pap and vleis, to the mass market – in a can. And it may help Africa’s hungry, nogal.Pap (a kind of mashed potato made from mealie meal), which is both nutritious and affordable, and vleis (Afrikaans for “meat”) have been the staple diet for millions of South Africans for years.As traditional as rugby, sunny skies and Chevrolet, pap and vleis is also an integral part of the country’s ubiquitous braai (barbecue) culture.Now Western Cape entrepreneur Willem Steenkamp has found a way to put it in a can, and the world – especially other African countries – are sitting up and taking note.Steenkamp says one of the problems was figuring out how to keep the pap fresh – it gets sour after a few hours. According to Standards South Africa (stanSA), products with meat content have to be sterilised and have a shelf life of at least three years.“Pap alone is not a problem and does not need a long, intensive sterilisation process, but things get more complicated when meat is added, as it is more likely to contain hazardous bacteria”, Steenkamp said in a recent interview in Business Day’s trade supplement, The South African Exporter.To satisfy stanSA, the meat content had to be 40%, but Steenkamp battled the body down to 10% after market research showed there was demand for less meat.Steenkamp says even the machinery to put pap in a tin on the production line didn’t exist. And that was only half the problem.“The label is a problem all of its own, as it has to carry all the info that the health department and [stanSA] want on its nutritional information and ingredients as determined by an accredited laboratory, the recommended daily allowance and serving suggestions”, Steenkamp told The South African Exporter.Heating instructions also have to be “in an understandable sign form for those who can’t read”.Steenkamp says he expects success with his unique product in both the local and export market – and that his product could even go some way towards solving food shortages on the continent. “With this traditional African cuisine one can feed the hungry”, he said.He says there has been a lot of interest in his product from African governments, donor feeding schemes, and even mines. After samples were showcased in Japan, Steenkamp says prominent figures in government throughout Africa have contacted him.Steenkamp has negotiated a deal with Bull Brand, the established canned meat company, to manage the local marketing of the product, using their own label under patent-holder licence.The local retail market received the first tins in April and, according to Bull Brand, there is demand. “The chain stores indicated that they are very positive”, Steenkamp said.Some typically South African words and phrases used in this piece: Nogal – too, as well.Pap – a kind of mashed potato made from mealie meal (literally “porridge”).Vleis – Afrikaans for meat.“Rugby, sunny skies and Chevrolet” – lines from a 1970s radio advert for Chevrolet denoting things truly South Africa. The complete phrase was “braaivleis, rugby, sunny skies and Chevrolet”.Braai – barbeque.South African cuisine – a glossary of termsSouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

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SA’s hydro power potential

first_img23 July 2004Energy experts say South Africa has moderate hydroelectric potential, and that the establishment of small hydroelectric projects around the country could help provide a sustainable future energy supply.The US department of energy estimates that there are 6 000 to 8 000 potential sites in South Africa suitable for small hydro-utilisation below 100 megawatts, with the provinces of KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape offering the best prospects.The largest hydroelectric power plant in South Africa is the 1 000 megawatt Drakensberg Pumped-Storage Facility, part of a larger scheme of water management that brings water from the Tugela River into the Vaal watershed. The country’s second-largest plant is situated on the Palmiet River outside Cape Town.South Africa’s electricity parastatal, Eskom, currently buys power from Mozambique’s Cahora Basa plant, jointly owned by the Mozambican and Portuguese governments and located in Mozambique’s western Tete province.Eskom is the Cahora Basa’s biggest customer. Power bought from Cahora Basa supplements Eskom’s largely coal-driven electricity supply, which is resold to numerous countries across the African contintent.Not flowing so smoothlyDelivering her department’s budget speech in June, Minerals and Energy Minister Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka told Parliament that the government would continue to explore the benefits of hydroelectric power – despite international warnings about its downside.Mlambo-Ngcuka singled out central Africa’s Inga project, on the Congo River in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The project is expected to produce 40 000 megawatts once fully operational. Eskom is a major investor in the project.According to Business Day, another hydroelectric project is being planned for Uganda, where a proposed US$580-million dam on the Nile could eventually generate 200 megawatts of power for the region.Industrialised countriess suggested at a recent conference in Germany that hydroelectric power was not a renewable energy source under the guidelines agreed at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development held in Johannesburg.Mlambo-Ngcuka argued, however, that the potential environmental challenges facing hydro-electric power were being “over-problematised”, and that Africans could not afford to alienate any source of energy, as this would retard development and industrialisation on the continent.“The view from Africa is that if Africa is going to have security and access to energy, we cannot alienate any source of energy, otherwise we might as well close shop on development and industrialisation of any sort”, Mlambo-Ngcuka told Parliament.She said environmental issues would be closely scrutinised before a decision was reached on South Africa’s nuclear or hydroelectric power options.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

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