Tag: 蒸桑拿去哪

Better Together inspires students to be civil

first_imgLinkedin World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Facebook TCU will not raise tuition for the 2021-22 academic year Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Renee Umsted TCU 360 staff win awards at the Fall National College Media Convention Renee is a journalism major. She is dedicated to improving her journalism skills to effectively and ethically inform others. TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Twitter Students who are not members of Better Together attended the group’s meeting, which was a service activity.- Photo by Renee Umsted Welcome TCU Class of 2025 + posts Jacqueline Lambiase is still fighting for students ‘Horned Frogs lead the way’: A look at TCU’s ROTC programs Facebook Twitter Linkedin printBetter Together, TCU’s interfaith group, encourages students to engage in civil discourse about sensitive or debated religious topics.Through dinners, conversations, service and other activities, Better Together aims to teach students how to respectfully ask difficult questions of each other.During their meeting, Better Together made sandwiches to give to the Presbyterian Night Shelter. – Photo by Renee UmstedThe lesson in civil discourse comes as the nation struggles with a lack of civility and rancorous debate around a variety of subjects, not just matters of religion. Rather than politely suggesting ideas and listening to the opinions of others, people often attack each other, exacerbating the current political and social climates.“I want people to be more gentle with each other,” said Britt Luby, the adviser and TCU’s associate chaplain.Christianity, including its branches, is the largest faith represented at TCU. However, in meetings attended by about 10 students, there are not significantly more Christians than students who practice other religions, Luby said. In larger meetings, however, when 30 or more students attend, most of the students are Christians.Christianity is the most common religion represented at TCU, but more than 20 Christian denominations are represented at TCU, showing the diversity even within one major religion.Luby said students tend to join Better Together after an event that sparks an interest in interfaith dialogue occurs. For example, some members of the group participated in the protest of the travel ban last year. They talked with other students who inspired them to want to know more about Better Together. Nasr Alkhabi, a senior social work major, has been involved with Better Together for three years. Alkhabi, a Muslim, said there were two or three other Muslim students in the interfaith group last year.“Better Together is the first step and the way to open my mind to other people, to accept others,” Alkhabi said. Brennan Steed, a senior political science and religion double major, joined Better Together this year. She said she did not participate in the group earlier because she did not know about it.“I joined Better Together because I wanted to get to know people of different faith groups,” Steed said.Steed has learned about various religious groups at TCU through the religious advisory council, but she said she hopes to make friends with and learn from people who practice religions other than Christianity, which is her faith.Steed said there were about three other Christian students at Better Together’s first meeting this year.  “I hope to be able to articulate my experiences but also listen to others,” Steed said. Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ ReddIt ReddIt Previous articleNew express food pick-up option on campusNext articleNews Now 9/12/18 Renee Umsted RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

Read more…

O’Rourke enters 2020 race with appeal beyond ‘party persuasion’

first_imgKEOKUK — Surrounded by cameras, reporters and curious Iowans, former Texas Congressman Beto O’Rourke launched his campaign for the White House in some crowded southeast Iowa venues Thursday.Joe Fierce of Keokuk wasn’t sure how to pronounce the candidate’s first name.“All I really know about him is he was running against Ted Cruz and, for me, that’s a ‘gold seal’ right there,” Fierce told Radio Iowa.Beto O’Rourke drew national attention as he finished two-and-a-half points short of defeating the Republican Senator from Texas in 2018. Fierce was up early today to listen to O’Rourke, but he’s hoping former Vice President Joe Biden runs.“I might be kind of counter the trend on this because I know there’s a ‘Mr. Smith Goes to Washington’ vibe now, throw the bums out now. All of ’em,” Fierce said. “I think, however, that we need someone who knows how it works.”Bonnie Peevler of Keokuk said O’Rourke is “of course” on her radar as she reviews her 2020 presidential choices.“I think the character of the person matters more than the experience,” Peevler said, describing O’Rourke as “intelligent and thoughtful.”Austin Bayliss, a Trump voter in 2016, drove nearly 100 miles from Wellman to Keokuk to see O’Rourke.“It’s too early tell as far as who I’m going to caucus for,” Bayliss said, adding he intends to see every presidential candidate in person.Heather Morgan of Keokuk said O’Rourke has everything she’s looking for in a candidate.“He’s very conservative for a Democrat and I think if anybody can steal Republican votes, it’s probably going to be him,” Morgan told Radio Iowa.O’Rourke shook her hand and many others in the Lost Canvass Coffee Shop in Keokuk before climbing on a chair and promising to campaign for the vote of “every single American.”“I could care less your party persuasion, your religion, anything other than the fact that right now we are all Americans and we are all human beings and we would do anything in our power for one another, for this great country and for every generation that follows,” O’Rourke said near the end of his opening statement in Keokuk. “This is democracy.”O’Rourke also made stops in Fort Madison, Burlington and Muscatine Thursday.last_img read more

Read more…

Only one new case of COVID-19 reported in our listening area in 24-hour period ending at 11:00 AM today

first_imgWright331 Area Total311-3 Kossuth85 Floyd19 Confirmed CasesNew Cases Wright1881 Winnebago11 Kossuth12-2 Butler12 Cerro Gordo18 Floyd151 Franklin13-1 Floyd1 Winnebago10 Deaths Mitchell4 Area Total3 Wright Mitchell Franklin6 Worth Cerro Gordo1 DES MOINES — After the numbers of COVID-19 cases in our listening area jumped in the last two weeks, the 24-hour period from 11:00 AM Tuesday to 11:00 this morning saw only one new case reported in our listening area.According to the Iowa Department of Public Health’s coronavirus website, only one new case was reported during that time frame, the lone case being in Wright County. There were four corrections in county totals made in our listening area, with two cases being reduced from Kossuth County and single cases being subtracted from Butler and Franklin.The total number of COVID-19 cases reported in our listening area now sits at 311 — 188 in Wright;, 29 in Cerro Gordo; 19 in Floyd; 16 each in Butler and Hancock; 13 in Franklin; 12 in Kossuth; 11 in Winnebago; four in MItchell; and three in Worth. Seven more local cases have recovered — five in Kossuth and one each in Floyd and Wright — for a total of 117.Looking at the state totals, only 54 more cases of COVID-19 were reported in the same 24-hour period for a total now of 20,010.Six more deaths were reported for a total of 566.321 more people have recovered for a total of 11,925. Butler16-1 Worth3 Hancock16 RecoveredNew Recovered Kossuth Mitchell4 Franklin Hancock Worth3 Cerro Gordo29 Butler1 Area Total1177 Hancock8 Winnebagolast_img read more

Read more…

Capital Area Regional Public Facilities District Board Vacancy

first_imgFacebook5Tweet0Pin0Submitted by City of LaceyThe elected officials of Lacey, Olympia, Tumwater, and Thurston County seek to fill a vacancy for a regional representative on the Capital Area Regional Public Facilities District (CAR-PFD) board. Eligible applicants must live within Thurston County, Olympia, Lacey, or Tumwater and submit a letter of interest by April 1, 2019, to:City of LaceyPeri Edmonds, City Clerk420 College Street SELacey, WA 98501The CAR-PFD, a municipal corporation, is a special taxing district created by Lacey, Olympia, Tumwater, and Thurston County in 2003. It finances payments on bonds issued by Lacey and Olympia for construction of two regional events centers—Lacey’s Regional Athletic Complex and Olympia’s Hands on Children’s Museum.The District is authorized to receive 0.033% of the state share of sales and use tax generated in the four jurisdictions as allowed by RCW 82.14.390. This legislation authorized the use of state revenue to promote economic development by supporting the construction of certain public facilities in local jurisdictions.The elected officials of Lacey, Olympia, Tumwater, and Thurston County each appoint one CAR-PFD board member. The remaining three board members are appointed as regional representatives, subject to recommendations from local business and community organizations. CAR-PFD board members serve four-year staggered terms.The seven member Public Facilities District Board of Directors has fiduciary responsibility for the appropriate use of sales tax revenue it collects and distributes. The board meets annually to review financial statements and issue an annual report to the public on the use of those funds.For more information, contact Peri Edmonds, Lacey City Clerk, at [email protected] or (360) 486-8704.last_img read more

Read more…