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Philadelphia homeless camp residents battle evictions

first_imgThe city of Philadelphia acted on its threat to evict the Kensington Avenue and Tulip Street tent cities, as Workers World newspaper reported on May 24. (tinyurl.com/y6ug447w) However, this removal didn’t occur without a fight. For the first time, encampment residents fought back against the anti-poor, pro-gentrification program.On the night of May 29, former and current members of the camp told their stories of addiction, recovery and being rebuffed by the city’s Crisis Response Centers after seeking help. Dozens of supporters came forward to provide food, water and care packages to the city’s most marginalized people.The next day, dozens more residents publicly made demands on the city for respect when people reach out for help and transparency from Community Behavioral Health, Pennsylvania’s behavioral health managed care provider. They called for more access to methadone and buprenorphine programs and for additional treatment beds and better shelters. Workers World Party-Philadelphia was at the scene and stood alongside those struggling against this oppressive, anti-poor system.Vanessa Baker, organizer of the protest, promised encampment residents that the protesters wouldn’t leave them. This remained true: On May 30, they returned to march down the streets, making their demands and anger known to the city’s gentrifiers, whose arrival prompted the evictions.WWP-Philadelphia will stay true to Baker’s promise and pledge to support the rights of former encampment members to adequate treatment, health care and housing, and of current residents at the remaining homeless camps in the city.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Andreas Jenssen spikes Syracuse’s ball movement in 1st-round ACC tournament win

first_img Published on November 4, 2015 at 11:10 pm Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettus Related Stories Syracuse advances in ACC tournament with 2-0 win over N.C. State Andreas Jenssen bent over and crouched in front of the North Carolina State goal line with his hands on his head. He recoiled and shook his head as he jogged back into play.The freshman was just a few feet away from his first collegiate goal. Midfielder Oyvind Alseth juked out a defender with a fake kick and hop to the right before sending the ball to a crashing Jenssen. He tapped it between the posts, but the goalkeeper made a diving save.Though he couldn’t earn his first career goal, Jenssen generated a slew of chances while starting in place of an injured Korab Syla. He made defensive stops, created offense with key passes from the midfield and was a constant nuisance for the Wolfpack before exiting with an apparent hip injury with 20 minutes left in the game. Jenssen’s play helped No. 7 seed Syracuse (11-5-2, 3-4-1 Atlantic Coast) beat No. 10 seed N.C. State (8-6-3, 1-5-3), 2-0, at SU Soccer Stadium in the first round of the ACC tournament on Wednesday night.The Orange will face No. 2 seed North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina on Sunday at 1 p.m. in the quarterfinals of the conference tournament.“He had a calming influence on us,” head coach Ian McIntyre said of Jenssen. “He can connect passes and against this N.C. state team we’re trying to find pockets where we can overload.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textPrior to the game, Syla ran approximately 20-yard sprints, but came up tugging at his leg each time. Jenssen took the field with the starters for the second time in three games, but for only the third time all season.On one play, he misjudged a pass in front of him and had to jab at it with his right foot at the last second. He fell to one knee while poking the ball to Alseth.Two slide tackles on separate occasions created offensive breaks for the Orange, too.“He covers a lot of ground, which gives me a little bit more freedom,” midfielder Julian Buescher said, adding that Jenssen seemed to be making more plays than in previous games.Just minutes after his near miss midway through the first half, he blasted a loose ball a few yards to the right of the net, nearly hitting a ball boy in the head.Unlike games in the past, McIntyre and the Orange players weren’t yelling at Jenssen to get in position or mark a player streaking through the midfield that he left undefended.McIntyre jokingly describes Jenssen as “5-foot-9 in high heels,” but his small stature didn’t prevent the midfielder from consistently using his body to draw fouls and shield opponents from the ball. His head coach called him a warrior for his efforts, while forward Chris Nanco described him as a little bugger.“He was in the right spots,” Nanco said. “You don’t really see the little guys running around like that.”After a few back-and-forth fouls between Jenssen and N.C. State’s Julius Duchscherer, Jenssen earned his first yellow card for pushing Duchscherer to the ground. His third scolding from a referee came when he jumped on top of an N.C. State player trying for a header and landed on his side.Several minutes later, Jenssen seemed to be hobbling slightly and McIntyre yelled at him to get on the ground.After a visit from the trainer, Jenssen hobbled to the sideline with his hand on his left hip — wincing with several steps.“When he went off we lost a little impetus on the ball,” McIntyre said.He spent the next 19 minutes jogging down the sideline, swinging his left leg and even laying on his back for a trainer to work on him. With 12 minutes left he donned a green pinnie as if he was ready to be subbed back in, but with a minute and a half to go, he swapped the pinnie for an orange team pullover and sat down.Jenssen’s night ended early and he wasn’t able to net his first collegiate goal, but the midfielder’s efforts were enough to help the Orange advance to the second round of the ACC tournament.“That’s all that we can ask for from him,” Nanco said. Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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John Gillon scores team-high 23 points in 99-77 win over BU after emotional week following grandfather’s death

first_img Published on December 10, 2016 at 4:12 pm Contact Matt: [email protected] | @matt_schneidman Facebook Twitter Google+ As the Orange pulled away in the second half, stretching its lead to over 30 points, Gillon continued flashing the repertoire of the dynamic point guard he came to Syracuse advertised as. He exited with 55 seconds remaining, along with the other four Syracuse players, as the walk-ons and Doyin Akintobi-Adeyeye entered to close out a dominant victory.After the game, Gillon sat comfortably among a swarm of reporters in the locker room. Boeheim, strapped in a black coat, walked by Gillon and jokingly asked, “John, where were they last week?” before chuckling and continuing on his way into the private coaches locker room.Gillon was hesitant at first to publicly mention his grandfather’s death because it might’ve been perceived as a justification for his poor play. But finally, following his best game of the season, Gillon felt more like himself again. Commentscenter_img John Gillon didn’t want his grandfather’s death to be an excuse.In Syracuse’s last two games, the fifth-year senior point guard didn’t score and chalked up his two lowest minute totals of the season. Gillon just wasn’t the same after his mom’s father died shortly before the Orange played North Florida last Saturday.“That was my main man. That was my go to,” Gillon said. “He kept our family together, just someone who was almost perfect. If you guys met him, he’d just leave an impression on you. I just wasn’t right.”After the Orange lost to Connecticut on Monday, the team flew back to Syracuse and arrived around 12:30 Tuesday morning. When the team bus arrived on campus, Gillon was the only player to stay at the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center. He entered through a back door behind Jim Boeheim since his ID didn’t give him access to the building at the time. For about two hours, he worked on ball-handling and practiced on a Shoot A Way machine that catches the ball near the hoop and ejects it back.Gillon wasn’t there to improve his game. He needed basketball, isolation, to get his mind off everything else.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I just had been having a lot going on lately…only way I can escape from some of it is just to get in the gym, not to really even get any work in,” Gillon said. “I just wanted to not even think about that, all the stuff that’s going on.”On Saturday, Gillon had the best game of his young Syracuse career. He scored a team-high 23 points on 7-of-9 shooting from the field and 6-of-7 from 3-point range in SU’s (6-3) 99-77 win over Boston University (4-6).The flashy point guard who could score in bunches, the one who had four double-digit scoring performances in the first six contests, had vanished. But after his first notable outing since the loss of a cornerstone in his life, Gillon seemed relieved sitting on an orange couch in the locker room.If anything, even if it’s just for now, one part of his life is back to normal.“He won the game for us,” Boeheim said.Jacob Greenfeld | Asst. Photo EditorSyracuse’s head managers – Nico Parauda, Jack Overdyk, Ben Horwitz and Jeff Maizes – typically stay at the practice facility for about an hour after returning from each road trip. They pack up the team gear, unload the bus and one manager cuts up film from the game. Early Tuesday morning, Parauda and Overdyk rolled out the Shoot A Way machine for Gillon and let him practice alone.“John’s that type of player that he wanted to get right back in the gym,” Overdyk said. “I wasn’t that surprised.”Until around 2 a.m., all Gillon had was a ball, the machine, a hoop and his thoughts. It seemed to help remedy his on-court struggles, as the Colorado State transfer canned four 3s in the first half alone and led Syracuse with 14 points at the break.He darted into the lane to create opportunities, a part of his game absent in the last several contests. He had ample space on the perimeter and dumped the ball in the hoop with ease from beyond the arc. Gillon’s three first-half assists led the team and he made both attempts from the foul line.“John really saved the game in the first half,” Boeheim said.MORE COVERAGE:Taurean Thompson has career day in Syracuse’s 99-77 victory over Boston UniversityWhat we learned from Syracuse’s victory on SaturdayAfterthoughts: Even after a big win, Syracuse still left wondering how much it can depend on its defenselast_img read more

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Locals get front row seat for ‘Dark Sky Week’

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisInternational Dark Sky Week began Sunday, April 15 to Sunday, April 21. Some locals took advantage of one of the designated dark sky parks in the state to gaze at the stars in the sky.Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/WBKBTV/ Twitter | https://twitter.com/WBKB11 Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/wbkbtv/AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious ‘Goldilocks’ makes an appearance at Wilson ElementaryNext WBKB Celebrated National Pretzel Day with Ben’s Soft Pretzelslast_img

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