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Panel showcases legal careers

first_img Director of Career Crossings Stacie Jeffirs said she values the insight alumnae involved in various professions can offer to students interested in those jobs.   “Thinking about pursuing a career in law is something very common for our students to think about,” Jeffirs said. “Panels, like this, offers students networking opportunities and show students just how passionate our alumnae are about their careers.” Jeffirs moderated the panel, which included a discussion on a wide range of topics. Each panelist began by describing the unique paths that led to their acceptances into law school. “From a very young age I always knew I wanted to be a lawyer,” Janet Horvath, a current partner at Jones Obenchain, LLP of South Bend, said. Kristina Campbell, associate professor of law at the University of District Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, said her path to law was “by no means direct.” “I pursued other programs after I graduated from Saint Mary’s,” she said. “Ultimately, I knew I wanted to be active in social justice and a law degree is a great tool for instigating social change. I was an idealist hoping to change the world through law.” MaryBeth Wilkinson, assistant general counsel of Owens-Illinois, Inc. said she joined law for the sole reason of “making money.””I grew up on a small farm in Michigan and wanted a ticket out,” Wilkinson said. “I joined law to make money, but over the years I have developed a strong passion for litigation. Litigation is like a war-zone or a game. I love being a part of this game.” Horvath said she truly loves her job working in insurance defense and litigation. “Not only do I work in a family friendly place where I can balance my family and my job, but I love going into work and knowing I am taking a burden away from other individuals,” she said. “When someone passes away in the family or a business needs to be passed down, a lot of people do not know what to do. I am there for those people, and it is truly rewarding.” Campbell said she became better equipped to tackle the challenges associated with working in an adversarial profession because of the challenges she overcame as a woman beginning work as a lawyer.     “The law profession, litigation in particular, is very adversarial. You really need to have tough skin and not let little criticisms bother you,” Campbell said. “I often look back on my career as a young female lawyer and think about how my gender was actually an advantage. People underestimated me and it turned out to work in my favor.” The panelists said women have made significant strides in the legal field.  Wilkinson said she believes the legal profession asks its lawyers to handle great responsibility. “Law is one of the most powerful positions you can be in, especially for women,” she said. “As a lawyer and as a professional, all you really have is your reputation. You can’t fake integrity and you can’t fake ethics.” Wilkinson said the two most important assets to have when pursuing any profession – not only law – are integrity and passion for the job. “Know yourself inside and out,” Campbell said. “My Saint Mary’s liberal arts education prepared me for the real world because I was well aware of my own personal values. With these values I could then start a career in immigration law that I now love.” Horvath said students should begin to search for opportunities now. “We are here to help facilitate your pursuits,” she said. “Don’t be afraid to speak up and take advantage of the different opportunities this college has to offer. We all cannot repeat enough that we are here for you. We want to see you succeed.” Saint Mary’s alumnae in the legal profession advised students interested in law about how best to pursue a career the field in a panel discussion Tuesday night.The panel, titled “Women in Law: The Lawyer Alumnae Panel” featured three alumnae from all different sectors of the field.last_img read more

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Not all millennials are created equal

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Millennials are the largest generation in world history, numbering 80 million and commanding $1.3 trillion in direct annual spending in the U.S. alone. These consumers (where many define the oldest as 35 years old) represent a surprisingly diverse financial services segment, with varied needs and behaviors. This segment is more digitally focused than any previous generation, with connections to financial organizations reflecting their comfort with the App economy.To connect with this segment that has increasing financial clout, it is important for both traditional banking organizations and fintech start-ups to build digital experiences that are seamless, well-designed and integrated with this segment’s lifestyle. For a deeper look into how financial organizations can better serve the Millennial segment, Oracle surveyed more than 4,500 consumers across 9 markets – Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, UK and the U.S. in their report, “The Millennial Migration: How Banks Can Remain Relevant In Their Decision-Making Eco-System.”Millennial Segment DiversityOracle divided Millennials into four sub-segments: Young Millennials (aged 18-21), Middle Millennials (aged 22-25), Mature Millennials (aged 26-30), and Grey Millennials (aged 31-45 years old). These age-based segments provided better insights into the differences in use of and reliance on different financial services providers. continue reading »last_img read more

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Brazil Withdraws Bid to Host 2023 Women’s World Cup

first_imgBrazil has withdrawn its bid to host the 2023 Women’s World Cup.The Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF) said yesterday that the government did not consider it wise to offer financial guarantees in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.Brazil will now support Colombia’s proposal, which is up against Japan and a joint bid from Australia and New Zealand to host the 32-team tournament. FIFA will vote to select the hosts on 25 June.“Because of the fiscal and economic austerity brought on by the Covid-19 pandemic, (the government) thought it would not be recommended to right now sign the guarantees asked for by FIFA,” said a CBF statement.Brazil has hosted a number of major international sporting competitions in recent years, including the men’s World Cup in 2014, the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games and the Copa America in 2019. But the CBF felt it was an outsider to host yet another big event.The country has been badly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic, with more than 35,000 deaths and in excess of 640,000 confirmed infections, but the latter number is believed to be much higher because of insufficient testing.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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‘Lucky Charm’ finally getting her chance

first_imgIt’s a sunny April afternoon, and Liz Klemp is joking around with a teammate after practice. As she talks to her friend, she flashes a bright smile. Any minute, her name will be called out by one of her teammates, each of whom has a special connection with the fun-loving, extra-friendly junior catcher.While one of her peers might call out, “Liz!” any of her coaches might call her by one of their many nicknames for her; one moment Klemp is “Lucky Charm,” the next, she’s “Secret Weapon,” the next, she’s “Lucky Leprechaun.”While Klemp was certainly kept a secret during her first two years at the UW, it would be a stretch to call her “lucky” — at least back then. She didn’t record an official at-bat in her first two years with the team.”I kind of just got overlooked,” she explains.And she had to labor as the bullpen catcher in practice, squatting for hours on end, working tirelessly at a thankless job. And on top of that, she didn’t even get a “thank you” from the coaching staff. Regimented and satisfied with their day-to-day, more senior hitters, the coaches didn’t even let Klemp take cuts in batting practice.Finally, after two years without any opportunity to prove her worth, Klemp’s luck is starting to turn.After last season, the UW softball coaching staff underwent a complete makeover. A new head coach — Chandelle Schulte — was hired, and her two assistant coaches were also new and handpicked by Schulte herself.Just like that, every player on the team started from scratch. It didn’t matter who had played well — or who had played, period — in the past. A page was turned in UW softball history, and whoever deserved to help write the newest chapter would have the chance to write it.With a chip on her shoulder and something to prove, Klemp immediately got to work. She made a lasting impression on the new coaching staff, working just as hard as anybody else to earn a new role on the team.For the first time in her college career, Klemp would have a chance to seriously contribute to UW softball.”At the beginning [of the season], Liz knew her role was probably going to be in the bullpen, and [that she’d] have to earn a spot in the lineup,” explained assistant coach Martha McCall. “And [after working all year long], she’s [now] the first one we go to [off] the bench. She’s our go-to girl. And she’s earned that.”Klemp has gotten used to having to earn her keep. A four-sport athlete at Milwaukee Lutheran High School — she played softball, golf, basketball and volleyball until her senior year, when she decided to focus solely on the former two sports — she was only recruited to two small-time, Division III schools to play softball. When the UW offered her the Chick Evans Caddie Scholarship, she decided that it was in her — and her family’s — best interest to take advantage of the full ride. Before she knew it, her vision of being a college athlete had taken a severe blow. What was once a sure thing evaporated into a sure dream.Easily, Klemp could have given up on softball. She had the perfect excuses at her disposal — she was a freshman coming to a large campus where she would have to balance academics and a social life and would have to maintain her duties as a golf caddie all at the same time.But that is simply not the way Klemp operates. In fact, she never even had an inkling of giving up; rather, she started her journey to becoming a successful college athlete by working harder than she had ever worked before. Her diligence has paid off. Currently, Klemp sports the second-highest batting average on the team — hitting at a scorching .353 — and has hit the third-most home runs on the entire squad.”I knew I had to really start working hard if I wanted to … keep playing softball,” Klemp said. “I knew it was kind of a long shot, but I tried out [for the team anyway].”Needless to say, Klemp made the squad. She did so by employing a strong work ethic that, according to her, she established in high school.In college, she has excelled both on and off the field. Her coaches love her gung-ho attitude, and many of her teammates refer to her as their best friend on the team.”Liz is amazing,” teammate Katie Hnatyk said. “I spend a lot of time with [her].” “She’s just got a heart,” Schulte said. “Liz wants to get it done so bad, she finds a way. I don’t know — I think it really adds something to our team because [her teammates] get excited every time she gets out there.”The first-year skipper smiles when she thinks of her “Lucky Leprechaun.””But you have to use her in the right situations,” added Schulte. “You can’t use all your luck up at one time.”Klemp is thankful that her coaches use her at all.”They gave me that chance,” Klemp said. “And I took it, and I’m running with it.”last_img read more

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Andreas Jenssen spikes Syracuse’s ball movement in 1st-round ACC tournament win

first_img Published on November 4, 2015 at 11:10 pm Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettus Related Stories Syracuse advances in ACC tournament with 2-0 win over N.C. State Andreas Jenssen bent over and crouched in front of the North Carolina State goal line with his hands on his head. He recoiled and shook his head as he jogged back into play.The freshman was just a few feet away from his first collegiate goal. Midfielder Oyvind Alseth juked out a defender with a fake kick and hop to the right before sending the ball to a crashing Jenssen. He tapped it between the posts, but the goalkeeper made a diving save.Though he couldn’t earn his first career goal, Jenssen generated a slew of chances while starting in place of an injured Korab Syla. He made defensive stops, created offense with key passes from the midfield and was a constant nuisance for the Wolfpack before exiting with an apparent hip injury with 20 minutes left in the game. Jenssen’s play helped No. 7 seed Syracuse (11-5-2, 3-4-1 Atlantic Coast) beat No. 10 seed N.C. State (8-6-3, 1-5-3), 2-0, at SU Soccer Stadium in the first round of the ACC tournament on Wednesday night.The Orange will face No. 2 seed North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina on Sunday at 1 p.m. in the quarterfinals of the conference tournament.“He had a calming influence on us,” head coach Ian McIntyre said of Jenssen. “He can connect passes and against this N.C. state team we’re trying to find pockets where we can overload.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textPrior to the game, Syla ran approximately 20-yard sprints, but came up tugging at his leg each time. Jenssen took the field with the starters for the second time in three games, but for only the third time all season.On one play, he misjudged a pass in front of him and had to jab at it with his right foot at the last second. He fell to one knee while poking the ball to Alseth.Two slide tackles on separate occasions created offensive breaks for the Orange, too.“He covers a lot of ground, which gives me a little bit more freedom,” midfielder Julian Buescher said, adding that Jenssen seemed to be making more plays than in previous games.Just minutes after his near miss midway through the first half, he blasted a loose ball a few yards to the right of the net, nearly hitting a ball boy in the head.Unlike games in the past, McIntyre and the Orange players weren’t yelling at Jenssen to get in position or mark a player streaking through the midfield that he left undefended.McIntyre jokingly describes Jenssen as “5-foot-9 in high heels,” but his small stature didn’t prevent the midfielder from consistently using his body to draw fouls and shield opponents from the ball. His head coach called him a warrior for his efforts, while forward Chris Nanco described him as a little bugger.“He was in the right spots,” Nanco said. “You don’t really see the little guys running around like that.”After a few back-and-forth fouls between Jenssen and N.C. State’s Julius Duchscherer, Jenssen earned his first yellow card for pushing Duchscherer to the ground. His third scolding from a referee came when he jumped on top of an N.C. State player trying for a header and landed on his side.Several minutes later, Jenssen seemed to be hobbling slightly and McIntyre yelled at him to get on the ground.After a visit from the trainer, Jenssen hobbled to the sideline with his hand on his left hip — wincing with several steps.“When he went off we lost a little impetus on the ball,” McIntyre said.He spent the next 19 minutes jogging down the sideline, swinging his left leg and even laying on his back for a trainer to work on him. With 12 minutes left he donned a green pinnie as if he was ready to be subbed back in, but with a minute and a half to go, he swapped the pinnie for an orange team pullover and sat down.Jenssen’s night ended early and he wasn’t able to net his first collegiate goal, but the midfielder’s efforts were enough to help the Orange advance to the second round of the ACC tournament.“That’s all that we can ask for from him,” Nanco said. Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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