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Talented teenagers in Scottish championship squad

first_img4 Mar 2014 Talented teenagers in Scottish championship squad England Golf will send a squad of six talented teenagers to defend the Scottish U16 girls’ open stroke play championship at Strathmore, from 10-11 April. They are: Cloe Frankish (image © Leaderboard Photography) and Mollie Lawrence of Kent, Sammy Fuller of Surrey, Hollie Muse and Louisa Brunt of Lancashire, and Billie-Jo Smith of Lincolnshire. All six are members of England Golf training squads and this event provides developing players with an excellent opportunity to travel and prepare together as a squad. England Golf players have a very good record in this championship. Last year, Alice Hewson of Hertfordshire became the fourth successive English winner of the individual title and also helped to win the team prize, alongside Sophie Madden of Essex and Eloise Healey of Lancashire. The players: Team A Cloe Frankish, 14, (Chart Hills) was runner-up in last year’s Scottish U14 stroke play and shared second place in the girls’ event at the Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters. She was third in the U14 section of the North of England championship and represented Kent at County Finals. Sammy Fuller, 14, (Roehampton) is the most experienced member of the squad. She is an England girl international and helped to win the 2013 Girls’ Home Internationals. She has also represented GB&I in the Junior Vagliano Trophy. She is a past English U13 champion and last year had top 10 finishes in three women’s championships: the Welsh and Irish Opens and the English amateur. Hollie Muse, 14, (West Lancashire) is another past winner of the English U13 title. Last year she won the Royal Birkdale ladies’ scratch tournament, the U14 title at the North of England Championship and the prize for the best score in qualifying by an U14 player at the British girls’ championship. Team B Louisa Brunt, 15, (Ashton-under-Lyne) tied 10th in last year’s Scottish U16s and also had a top ten finish in the English girls’ U15 championship. She trains with England Golf’s U16 North West squad. Mollie Lawrence, 15, (Rochester & Cobham Park) was a member of the Kent women’s team which competed at the 2013 English County Finals. She was sixth in the English U15 girls’ championship and tied fifth in the girls’ event at the Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters. Billie-Jo Smith, 14, (Woodhall Spa), was 10th in the English U15 championship last year and tied 11th in the St Andrews junior ladies’ open. She trains with the England Golf U16 East Midlands squad.last_img read more

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Bombers enter boy’s soccer zones as the team to beat

first_img“In fact we have only had four goals against us and scored 42,” Spendlove adds.Second ranked Prince Charles Comets of Creston meet the winner of Golden and Trail’s J. Lloyd Crowe.”They are a real treat to watch . . .with a good solid defence, skillfull midfield and quick offence,” said Spendlove, who assists son Jamie on the coaching staff.”We only have four Grade 12’s in a squad of 24 players so the next few years look promising.”The two semi final winners advance to the Kootenay AA Final at 4:30 p.m.The Kootenay champ represents the region at the B.C. High School AA Boy’s Championships November 19-21 in Burnaby. The L.V. Rogers Bombers are the early favourite to capture the Kootenay High School AA Boy’s title when the zone tournament opens Saturday in Creston.The Bombers enter the six-team tourney as the top ranked team and get a bye into the semi final round Saturday, playing the winner of the Invermere’s David Thompson/Stanley Humphries of Castlegar contest at 1:30 p.m. at the Rec Centre Field in Creston.”The boys have done great this year and are looking and playing with lots of class and style (come Saturday),” said coach Dave Spendlove.”We lost only one game out of nine this season and that was due to injuries mounting up over the course of the tournament in Summerland.”last_img read more

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PBS Airs Another Evolution Series: Origins

first_imgNotably absent from the promotional ads was any mention of the “E” word, evolution.  Nevertheless, the concept saturated the series like sauce to pasta.Maybe PBS learned its lesson from October 2001 that the E word is a lightning rod.  Concepts are not mitigated by avoidance of loaded words and euphemisms.  Maybe Origins is gentler word, but this was nothing less than “PBS Evolution 2004” (See 09/28/2001 headline), and evolution was the last word Tyson uttered, with feeling.    The series so far exhibits the perpetual sins of the Darwin Party: (1) just-so storytelling, (2) glittering generalities, (3) selective evidence, (4) bluffing (e.g., “How life began” when they haven’t a clue), and (5) empty promises (futureware).  The hype keeps Charlie’s disciples hoping for success in the snipe hunt for a naturalistic explanation for a universe that appears designed for a purpose.    One aspect about Origins was predictable: the series only vaguely, when at all, hinted that the majority of the earth’s population believes, and always has believed, that the universe was designed for a purpose by an intelligent Creator.  Instead, it presented as fact the naturalistic philosophy believed by only 10-15% of the population that everything came from nothing.  Moreover, glossed over many serious flaws in the naturalistic scenario, and failed to give a fair hearing to competent scientists who could present valid alternatives.  We commented on this series in some depth, but it is really no different from the standard Darwinian propaganda pouring forth from PBS, the Science Channel and the Discovery Channel and National Geographic, week after week, year after year.  The rules are: assume evolution, ignore alternatives, prohibit rebuttals, ridicule believers in God, tell stories, worship scientism, and fill in the evidential gaps (canyons) with artwork.  Sagan taught them well.    The final lines in the final episode are the key to interpreting this series and the other Darwinian commercials.  It’s not about scientific evidence, because the closing lines are a classic case of stretching an inch of data into a light-year of interpretation.  No, it’s about religion: evolutionists are out to replace belief in intelligent design with naturalism, particularly the Biblical account of creation.  A lady astronomer makes it clear: we now have “a new version of Genesis, a new version of the great cosmic myth, only this time it is scientifically based.”  Other astronomers agree, stating that finally, within our enlightened grasp, a universe that was once seen as the domain of the gods is now explainable by an unbroken sequence of natural law acting on undirected particles, producing a great chain of being (welcome to the 18th century).  Tyson, staring into the camera, morphs into Carl Sagan claiming that this vast and wonderful universe, with all its life, is the result of “14 billion years of cosmic evolution.”  At least we’re getting younger; Sagan claimed it was 15 billion.    If this kind of religious advocacy in the guise of science bothers you, why not do something about it?  Write letters and call your local PBS station.  Tell them you want to see a fair and balanced presentation of the evidence.  Be constructive; ask them to air The Privileged Planet and Unlocking the Mystery of Life alongside the Darwin Party’s propaganda.  We don’t want to muzzle the opposition like the Darwinists do, we want people to hear both sides, like Charlie advised, and think about the evidence.  Ask PBS to stage a debate; suggest that Tyson’s team face a matching team of qualified spokespersons for the intelligent design position.  Let them ask the right questions and put all the evidence on the table fairly, without stacking the deck.  Tell them the magic words that make any station manager light up: it will help ratings.(Visited 40 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 PBS NOVA aired its latest installment on evolution, a 4-hour miniseries entitled Origins, on September 28 and 29.  The website hype describes it as follows:Has the universe always existed?  How did it become a place that could harbor life?  What was the birth of our planet like?  Are we alone, or are there alien worlds waiting to be discovered?  NOVA presents some startling new answers in “Origins,” a groundbreaking four-part NOVA miniseries hosted by dynamic astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History.  Tyson leads viewers on a cosmic journey to the beginning of time and into the distant reaches of the universe, searching for life’s first stirrings and its traces on other worlds.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)The series has four parts.  Our reaction is added in green after each synopsis.Earth Is Born.  This episode describes the assumed first billion years of our planet.  “Bombarded by meteors and comets, rocked by massive volcanic eruptions, and scoured by hot acid rain, the early Earth seems a highly improbable place for life to have taken root.  Despite such violent beginnings, scientists have found new clues that life-giving water and oxygen appeared on our planet much earlier than previously thought.”What this series lacks in evidence it makes up for in animation.  The visuals of the first two episodes consisted primarily of computer animations and interviews with Darwinian storytelling scientists, interspersed with irrelevant shots of them appearing to do some real lab work.  Episode One is just a higher-tech version of Disney’s old Fantasia myth (not the dancing hippos, but the early earth).  Notable in “Earth Is Born” was a repeating theme that new discoveries have recently overturned long-held ideas, especially uniformitarianism.  That’s a good lesson, if they would just apply it to the current tale-telling and plan ahead.How Life Began.  This episode describes organisms living currently in extreme environments, and claims “The survival of these tough microorganisms suggests they may be related to the planet’s first primitive life forms.”As expected, this episode was an illustrated liturgy of the usual astrobiological mystery religion, carefully shielded from critical scrutiny.  The novitiates are instructed in the tenets of the faith: comets brought our oceans and the building blocks of life, the first life “emerged” in extreme environments, bacteria invented photosynthesis, the “great liberator,” which gave us our oxygen atmosphere and made complex life possible, leading to “immense colonies of green slime which would take over the world.”  They even gave prominent press to the old Miller experiment, the “useful lie” that gave naturalistic abiogenesis a shot in the arm (see 05/02/2003 headline).  This is so retro.  The dramatic footage of sparks and bubbling chemicals was no match for the quick disclaimer that scientists debate the “recipe” for life and when it occurred.  Big Lie of the Episode: “When you get the recipe right, it goes, and it goes quickly.”  (How quickly?  Read our book).  Over and over, the Darwinists repeated their surprise at how quickly life “emerged” and evolved on the early earth despite all the meteor bombs, and the “hellish” conditions under which it arrived and thrived.    The pretentious air of this series borders on goofy, with its 1960-era sci-fi sound effects, hushed undertones and gimmicky cartoons.  Tyson’s phony dramatic delivery gets tedious real fast, especially with lines like “the building blocks of life arrived special delivery – from outer space!” and “photosynthesis: a clever invention; once it started, it was a runaway success.”  One can only hope this childishness will backfire on today’s precocious youngsters (especially home schoolers).  Maybe this series will be useful some day, to demonstrate what certain mad scientists believed in the early 21st century.  Young minds who don’t know better (especially some public schoolers) should be inoculated against raw propaganda and non-sequiturs like since life is found today in extreme environments, it must have evolved there.  Best give them a chance to learn basic logic first.    Any scientific evidence presented in this series was irrelevant to the story line; every bit of it has been contested by other evolutionary scientists, as reported right here in these pages for four years now (follow the “origin of life” chain links to get a higher education than you will get by watching Origins).  Evolutionary theory, from earth science to abiogenesis to human evolution, is a string of just-so mythoids glued together with irrelevant factoids.  Once in awhile you catch them admitting it: yes, the deuterium to hydrogen ratio in comets differs from that in the oceans, so maybe Earth’s water was not delivered by comets (sure makes a good animation, though).  Yes, the origin of life is an “astonishing mystery that we don’t understand,” and the “leap from non-living chemicals to a living cell is staggeringly complex” (but that Miller experiment looks so cool, so Frankenstein).    The myth, concocted in Fantasyland, thrives in Tomorrowland.  It’s not finding the answer, it’s wishing upon a star that matters.  Evolutionists, like Coronado on his quest for the seven gold cities, want to keep the dream alive, always out there around the next bend.  They rationalize their government-funded research as an adventurous quest to answer the great questions, to discover the secrets to our origins: which, being interpreted, means, they haven’t got a clue.  No matter; it’s not a product, it’s a process.  The goal, explaining everything without a Creator, must remain forever out of reach.  So Origins gives us process, becoming, futureware, unfulfilled promises, bluffing and dreams.  At every turn are the faith words: maybe, may have, perhaps, likely, controversial, debated, appears to, think, believe, seems like, could be, coulda, woulda, mighta…. Science?  No; mystery religion.  Its worship services are arrayed in glittering generalities, icons, reveries, and beatific visions of personified molecules lifting themselves up by their own bootstraps and wishing their way to manhood.    If you watch reputable design-centric presentations like the Illustra Media films, you will see a fair and balanced presentation of both sides.  Creationists have debated the world’s leading evolutionists toe to toe on college campuses, and even against the home field advantage have usually won because they know more about the opposing view than its advocates do themselves.  But to its gross dishonor, nowhere does Origins even hint at a suggestion that any serious scientist or philosopher ever doubted naturalism or seriously considered that the orderliness of creation pointed to a all-wise Creator.  Tyson whimsically dismisses the straw man of Van Helmont’s 17th-century “recipe for life” (spontaneous generation of mice from wheat), totally ignoring millennia of the world’s greatest thinkers and scientists who have defended the view, with detailed logic, scientific evidence and refutation of counter-arguments, that life was designed.  This omission is so glaring, it is utterly inexcusable in a supposed educational “science” program.  Van Helmont’s spontaneous generation is more akin to today’s origin-of-life theories than to any credible design position.  It was Darwin and his disciples, not the creationists, were disappointed when Pasteur disproved spontaneous generation.    Moreover, the first two episodes seemed to go out of their way to portray a world opposite the view of Bible-believing Christians and Jews, showing animation after animation of hellish lava and meteor impacts, stating emphatically, “early Earth was not a garden of Eden.”  Ignoring and dismissing any hint of a good or purposeful creation, it presented irrational beliefs dogmatically as fact: “life did arise from nonliving chemicals,” and “for over a hundred years, scientists have known that life is the result of chemistry.”  Nowhere was there any doubt about the alleged millions and billions of years, each date quoted as if they had a stopwatch running the whole time.  The whole series in fact, is built on the metaphor of a clock, on which all of earth history has been compressed into 24 hours.  Humankind, of course, appears late in the last few seconds of the day, uncaused, uncared for, a mere happenstance of a long and brutal cosmic arcade.  Science is supposed to be about observation.  Where’s the instant replay of this hypothesis so we can validate it?    This one episode was so shoddy, so baloney-ridden, so unbalanced, so quirky, it should anger knowledgeable viewers enough to write PBS, NOVA, and the sponsors to complain that such mythology-as-fact was presented as if the only “scientific” approach to origins.  Let’s have a debate.  Let’s have the counter-evidence get a fair hearing.  Let’s watch The Privileged Planet and Icons of Evolution.  Let’s get some leading Design PhDs in the ring with Tyson and see who’s left standing when fair, unbiased judges call foul at cheap shots and enforce the rules of evidence.    The credits show this program was funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation – your tax dollars at work.  It can only be hoped that this series, like Evolution before it, will flop as another wimpy hurrah of a dying religion on the verge of being tossed onto the dust-bin of discredited ideas.  Evolutionary theory, like a black-light poster, only glows in a dark room shielded from all but carefully selected, artificially-generated wavelengths.  It looks very different when the windows are opened and natural sunlight shines in.Where Are the Aliens?  This episode imagines what life on other worlds might be like.Typical SETI sales pitch, with the usual suspects (Drake equation by Drake himself), and the usual mythoids spouted as fact: life is as simple as just add water, lots of planets means lots of life, asteroid destroyed the dinosaurs but gave mammals a chance, etc. – Tyson says without the asteroid extinction, a dinosaur might be hosting the show, and the animation cartoonists help our poor imaginations.  More “it’s true because I say so” posturing: “we know we got to this [scene of crowd in shopping mall with cell phones by their ears] from this [bacteria] by evolution.”    You might learn tidbits about extrasolar planets and cephalopod camouflage here and there, and hearing Peter Ward of Rare Earth fame explain why he thinks advanced life is uncommon is a partial treat.  Other than that, the entire premise of this episode is a stack of evolutionary assumptions, held together with hope, stacked on the foundational assumption of naturalism, presented dogmatically and without rebuttal, with artwork substituting for evidence.  Can’t the Darwin Party change their tactics, now that we’ve blown their cover?  The sight of a naked emperor strutting around as if nobody notices his little secret is not pretty.    More personification fallacy: “if carbon makes life happen….” [stop right there].  “If those other planets have caught the spark of life also….” [stop, I said].  The illogic gets so tiring: “Scientists haven’t figured out how that spark of life happened, but since it happened early on, maybe it’s not so hard.”  No hint that the most essential ingredient in life is information.  Watch this episode alongside The Privileged Planet and Unlocking the Mystery of Life.  No contest.  The silliness of the Origins series has one benefit: it makes a perfect foil for these two films, making their relevance and superior logic shine even more brightly.Back to the Beginning.  This episode examines current thinking about the Big Bang theory.Yes, tell us all about the 97% of invisible stuff, the force that binds the universe together.  If it only has a dark side, how do evolutionists explain the origin of good?  Will Tyson be able to solve the Great Equation of Evolution, E = Nt x Nb?  (Nothing times nobody equals everything.)    No luck.  Tyson spends most of the hour describing the historical search for the cosmic background radiation and slight irregularities within it.  As expected, the interpretations of the final data set from WMAP are hyped beyond all recognition (see 09/20/2004 headline).  A chef gives Tyson an intelligently designed stew, at which Tyson remarks that it is entirely analogous to what the stars cook up.  As Sagan 2004, Tyson really knows how to put the b in big, bang, and billion.     The episode provides some interesting historical and personal stories of scientists at work, but does little to answer the big questions the episode promised to address.  Instead, we are forced to listen to worn-out, personified cliches like “the baby picture of the universe” and “the birth pangs of the cosmos” and “we are all stardust.”  The animation team did a lot of work on this Fantasia, but we’d rather hear it put to music.  John Cage would be apropos.  How about 4’33”, repeated endlessly?last_img read more

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Citizens of Toledo approve the Lake Erie Bill of Rights

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Kolt Buchenroth and Matt ReeseThe Lake Erie Bill of Rights was passed by the citizens of Toledo in a special election held on Tuesday, Feb. 26. According to the results from the Lucas County Board of elections, the measure was passed by a vote of 61.4% to 38.6% with only 8.9% of voters turning out to the polls.There was a failed attempt to get this on the 2018 November ballot in Toledo. The effort to get LEBOR on the ballot was supported by out-of-state interests but it could have a very real in-state impact for a wide range of businesses. LEBOR opens up the possibility of thousands of lawsuits against any entity that could be doing harm to Lake Erie. This includes agricultural operations.“Farm Bureau members are disappointed with the results of the LEBOR vote. Our concern remains that its passage means Ohio farmers, taxpayers and businesses now face the prospect of costly legal bills fighting over a measure that likely will be found unconstitutional and unenforceable,” said Adam Sharp, executive vice president, Ohio Farm Bureau Federation. “Nevertheless, Farm Bureau members remain committed to finding and implementing real solutions to the lake’s challenges.”LEBOR grants rights to Lake Erie and empowers any Toledo citizen to file lawsuits on behalf of the lake. It gives Toledoans authority over nearly 5 million Ohioans, thousands of farms, more than 400,000 businesses and every level of government in 35 northern Ohio counties plus parts of Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New York and Canada. LEBOR was passed despite the prevailing legal opinion that many of its provisions are unconstitutional.“It says the lake should be free of pollution and things that could harm the lake. It makes the lake act as a person almost who can bring charges against people for harming it,” said Leah Curtis, director of agricultural law for Ohio Farm Bureau. “There is a concern that agriculture would be one of those industries that would be charged or sued with these lawsuits that could potentially come out of this charter amendment. It could really apply to anyone —not just agriculture — anyone who does something that might end up harming the lake. It could be a leaky septic system or other industries that may have permits that put limitations on what they can and cannot do. The Lake Erie Bill of Rights also invalidates those permits if those permits allow for any harm to Lake Erie. It has wide reaching effects. It has issues for lots of areas.”The day after LEBOR was approved by Toledo voters, Wood County farmer Mark Drewes filed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality and legal status of the Lake Erie Bill of Rights. Drewes’ suit was filed in the Federal District Court for Northern Ohio.Drewes Farm Partnership is a family crop operation in Custar with a significant history of being dedicated to improving water quality. Drewes is on the board of directors for The Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association and a long-time member of Ohio Farm Bureau.“Mark’s farm is an example of the right way of doing things,” Sharp said. “He’s employing a variety of conservation practices, water monitoring systems, water control structures and uses variable rate enabled equipment and yet he’s vulnerable to frivolous lawsuits. We are proud that our member has stood up against this overreach, and his efforts will benefit all Farm Bureau members, farmers and protect jobs in Ohio.”OFBF has historically engaged in precedent setting court cases that potentially affect its members. Farm Bureau will actively assist Drewes and his legal team throughout this litigation to ensure members’ concerns are heard. OFBF’s legal staff will monitor developments, lend agricultural expertise and provide supporting information about agriculture’s efforts to protect water quality.Drewes is represented by the law firm Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP, which has extensive experience fighting against onerous government action.“The Charter Amendment is an unconstitutional and unlawful assault on the fundamental rights of family farms in the Lake Erie Watershed — like the Drewes’ fifth generation family farm,” said Thomas Fusonie, a partner at Vorys and one of the counsel for Drewes. “The lawsuit seeks to protect the Drewes’ family farm from this unconstitutional assault.”The suit argues LEBOR violates federal constitutional rights, including equal protection, freedom of speech and is unenforceable for its vagueness. A request for preliminary and permanent injunction was also filed seeking to prevent enforcement of the law.“Farmers want and are working toward improving water quality, but this new Toledo law hurts those efforts. Mark Drewes understands this, and it’s Farm Bureau’s job to back his important actions on behalf of Ohio farmers,” Sharp said.last_img read more

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LeBron Kyrie And Draymond All Made History In The Cavs Win

Together, LeBron and Kyrie combined for a Game Score of 72.4, the top single-game performance by a duo in the finals since 1984. That means their collective performance topped any by Jordan and Pippen, O’Neal and Bryant, or even James and Wade — and it’s not particularly close. 19925CHIMichael Jordan33.3Scottie Pippen24.557.8 2012Heat @ Thunder228 19934CHIMichael Jordan38.9Horace Grant23.462.3 11989Magic JohnsonLAL1+6.5+1.7+8.3 19904PORClyde Drexler33.9Jerome Kersey26.059.9 1993Suns @ Bulls321 19855LALMagic Johnson29.7James Worthy29.158.8 Source: Basketball-Reference.com 1992Trail Blazers @ Bulls228 When the smoke cleared on Game 5 of the NBA Finals, LeBron James and Kyrie Irving had powered the Cleveland Cavaliers to the seventh-biggest finals upset since 1984,1The earliest year for which Basketball-Reference.com has complete game-level data. according to FiveThirtyEight’s Elo ratings (our favored way to get a snapshot of team quality). 2014Heat @ Spurs224 2003Nets @ Spurs221 2016Cavs @ Warriors526 42015Kyrie IrvingCLE5+4.7-0.8+3.8 51990Dennis RodmanDET1+1.3+2.3+3.6 20165CLELeBron James39.2Kyrie Irving33.272.4 92000Chris MullinIND3+2.4+0.8+3.2 Biggest NBA Finals upsets according to Elo forecast, 1984-2016 Source: Basketball-Reference.com 72016Kevin LoveCLE1+2.2+1.3+3.5 32000Kobe BryantLAL1+3.2+1.2+4.4 81996Nate McMillanSEA2-0.1+3.4+3.2 Dray is the second-best player to miss a finals game since ’84 But we shouldn’t let Golden State’s short-handedness take too much away from LeBron and Kyrie’s twin performances in Game 5. They scored 82 of Cleveland’s 112 points, accounted for 15 more with their assists to other Cavs and chalked up two of the top 22 single-game performances in the NBA Finals since 1984, according to Game Score, John Hollinger’s productivity rating. LeBron in particular dropped the second-best stat line of that entire span, trailing only Tim Duncan’s 2003 dismantling of the New Jersey Nets. 22016Draymond GreenGS1+1.4+3.7+5.1 101991James WorthyLAL1+2.3+0.5+2.9 BPM TALENT RATINGS Among players who played at least one finals game (i.e., those who were not injured earlier in playoffs, etc.)Source: Basketball-Reference.com, Daniel Myers 62015Andrew BogutGS2-1.4+5.0+3.5 20134MIADwyane Wade30.6LeBron James29.660.2 19871LALJames Worthy32.0Magic Johnson30.962.9 YEARPLAYERTEAMGAMES MISSEDOFFENSEDEFENSEOVERALL 19921CHIMichael Jordan36.9Scottie Pippen28.865.7 2001Sixers @ Lakers117% 1984Lakers @ Celtics127 YEARGAMETEAMNAMESCORENAMESCOREDUO SCORE Of course, Elo doesn’t capture that a certain someone was missing from Monday night’s game. Draymond Green, the Warriors’ all-world defender, playmaker and swag leader was suspended for Game 5 after picking up a flagrant foul from a shot at LeBron’s … [groin] area. The suspension was historic in its own right: According to the Box Plus/Minus talent ratings,2Consider these a slightly lower-fi version of ESPN’s Real Plus-Minus ratings, with the benefit that they can be computed going back to the 1970s. We’ve used them here in the past. Green is the second-best player to miss a finals game since 1984. (Magic Johnson’s 1989 absence takes the top spot — by a mile.) So take the magnitude of the Cavs’ Elo upset with a grain of salt. 2015Cavs @ Warriors224 YEARGAMEUPSET ODDS PLAYER 1PLAYER 2 1993Suns @ Bulls523 Top combined average Game Scores for single-game finals duos since 1984 20012LALShaquille O’Neal32.2Kobe Bryant26.158.3 Missing from this picture: the rest of the Cavs. Kevin Love, the team’s purported third banana, scored just 2 points and grabbed three rebounds, alongside four fouls and two turnovers. As a team, the Cavs had 16 turnovers and 22 fouls. That’s why it took both a historic suspension and a historic two-man performance for Cleveland to upset the Warriors and bring the series back to Ohio.Unfortunately for the Cavs, Green won’t be watching from next door in Game 6. And although LeBron and Co. will be at home, where Elo considers them 59 percent favorites to force a climactic Game 7, Cleveland was also the site of a late-game collapse and a double-digit defeat for the host team in Game 4. So the Cavs are not out of the woods yet — they’ve needed to make history to get this far against the defending champs, and to go any further, they’ll likely have to make some more.Check out our NBA Finals predictions. read more

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Pellegrini confident Carroll can rediscover best form for West Ham

first_imgWest Ham boss Manuel Pellegrini urged Andy Carroll to remain patient with his recovery and added that he’s certain the Englishman will rediscover his best formCarroll’s six and half year spell at West Ham has been blighted by recurring injury problems, which have restricted him to just 136 appearances in total.However, the former Liverpool striker scored his first goal since April in West Ham’s 2-0 FA Cup win over Birmingham on Saturday after returning from an ankle injury.This would have come as a welcome boost for Carrol, who was told last month by Pellegrini that he will have to prove to the club why they should hand him a new contract.“We are very happy with how Andy played,” Pellegrini told the club website.Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding at Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…“If you review his game, he scored, his play was good and he missed another chance to score, he cleared two or three aerial duels in our box, so in the way he plays, he will return to be the player we know he can be.“I never had any doubt Andy Carroll wants to stay here. He is happy here, he wants to play for the club, he is happy in London and he doesn’t want to go anywhere.“He wants to play like every player but he must be patient. When you come back from a long injury and you are not competing weekly, you have to be careful not to get another injury.“That’s why we are giving him some amount of minutes every game. I think if he recovers his shape and continues working every day of the week without any injuries there are not too many players with his quality.”The Hammers will next face Arsenal in a Premier League game this Saturday at their London Stadium.last_img read more

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Some San Diego public facilities closed for Presidents Day

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsIt’s Presidents Day, which means there are some closures. Government offices, public buildings in Balboa Park, libraries, and city pools will be closed.Public golf courses, recreational areas, and skate parks will remain open.There will be no service on the vintage trolley downtown loop. MTS will operate on the Saturday while the Sorrento Valley and North County Coasters will offer regular service. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter February 19, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom Posted: February 19, 2018 Some San Diego public facilities closed for Presidents Daylast_img read more

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