Category: bmrxcjkks

Snarky Puppy Shares Live Footage From Norweigan Jazz Festival [Watch]

first_imgAny fan of funky good music is certainly aware of Snarky Puppy, the Grammy-winning jazz collective that never fails to incite a jammed out boogie. The band recently made their way to Europe for a tour, which included a stop at the SildaJazz – Haugesund International Jazz Festival in Haugesund, Norway. Led by Michael League, the band has shared some great footage from their European festival for our viewing pleasure.Watch Snarky Puppy hard at work, below. Snarky Puppy also recently announced their very first music festival! Check out more information about that here.[Photo via Dave Vann/Jam Cruise 14]last_img

Read more…

GSD’s Kara wins Stirling Prize for building

first_imgThe Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has awarded its 2018 Stirling Prize to Foster + Partners’ “monumental,” “once-in-a-generation” European headquarters for Bloomberg LP, a project engineered by the Harvard Graduate School of Design’s (GSD) Hanif Kara and his firm AKTII. The Stirling Prize is RIBA’s most prestigious award, given annually to a new building in the United Kingdom deemed to have made the most significant contribution to British architecture in the past year.The 2018 Stirling Prize jury, chaired by Sir David Adjaye OBE and unanimous in its choice, said, “The design process involved unprecedented levels of research, innovation and experimentation, with pioneering new details and techniques tested, prototyped – sometimes at 1:1 scale – and rigorously improved.”Foster + Partners served as architect for the project, with AKTII as civil and structural engineer and Kara as design director. The project was conceived in close dialogue with Michael Bloomberg, CEO of Bloomberg LP, and his New York-based team. Foster + Partners and AKTII were appointed to deliver the project from conception through to construction, enriching it with a conceptual and architectural continuity that Kara says lies at the heart of his GSD pedagogy.“The ‘thought-to-construction’ element gives architects the opportunity to allow the research on and nature of the project to balance out and inform the selection of experts and other collaborators, rather than it being predetermined,” Kara observes.”This is a question I have dealt with in my GSD courses, especially in ‘Interdisciplinary Design in Practice’: how design research manifests itself beyond academia, and the advocacy that architects must apply in order to understand the project not just as a building, but to draw on what they want built.”Kara notes a variety of technical innovations that position the headquarters as an exemplar of the “work space of the future,” one that promotes personal well-being for inhabitants, environmental sustainability (RIBA writes that the building has been credited as the most sustainable office in the world), and employee productivity and idea-sharing.“These are topics we all deal with at school in our teaching and in debates that we have about the challenges the next generations face, and how great design can steward that,” Kara says. “The optimistic arc the project sets is a direct message to our students and alumni.”Unlike many office buildings, services like elevators and staircases are pushed to the building’s edges so workspaces for meeting and collaborating form the core of the building. Inside, a 210-meter high, triple-helix, bronze ramp leads upstairs, with a width that allows for spontaneous gatherings and conversations without impeding foot traffic. Throughout, systems for power, lighting, water, and ventilation make reuse of waste and respond to the building’s external climate as well as its internal occupancy patterns. The building’s multi-function ceilings are fitted with 2.5 million polished aluminum “petals” that work to regulate temperature, light, and sound.“It is difficult to separate architecture from engineering, and design from construction, with this project,” Kara observes.”That is its greatest achievement.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

Read more…

Activist shares story of poverty

first_imgAuthor, activist and scholar Willie Baptist highlighted the serious challenges America faces in the fight against poverty and homelessness when he shared his personal experiences with poverty during a Monday discussion. The Higgins Labor Studies Program sponsored the talk, which was held in Geddes Hall. In his introduction of Baptist, John Wessel-McCoy, an organizer for the Poverty Initiative and Poverty Scholars program at New York City’s Union Theological Seminary, said the program’s mission “came out of the great history of organizing what Willie Baptist embodies.” “[The Poverty Initiative] is dedicated to raising up generations of religious and community leaders committed to building a social movement to end poverty led by the poor,” Wessel-McCoy said. “We don’t want to make it kinder, gentler or slightly better. We want to end it.” Wessel-McCoy said mobilizing the poor to fight systemic causes of poverty is crucial to American social progress and the elimination of the growing wealth gap. “We have the productive capacity and means to … lift the load of poverty, and the fact that we have growing ranks of poor in America is what we feel is the defining issue of our time,” he said. “We must build a network of leaders who are organizing, working in congregations as religious leaders and engaging the plight and fight of the poor.” In a short film promoting his book “Pedagogy of the Poor,” Baptist, a formerly homeless father who now serves as the scholar-in-residence of the Poverty Initiative, said the poverty organizing movement must address root causes of American poverty to find a solution. “We have to look at the root structure of what produced the problem … The polarity of wealth and poverty in America means that the people most affected by it need to organize and be educated to solve problems,” he said. “Poverty scholarship is an understanding of the complexity and globalized character of poverty.” According to the film, the polarity in wealth distribution has led to a situation of “abandonment alongside abundance,” in which the top five percent of American earners have enjoyed unprecedented gains in wealth in recent years, while 46 million Americans live below the poverty line and one-third of the population lives on incomes just above that threshold. Baptist said this and several other contradictions characterize the reality of American poverty. “Every year, 46 billion pounds of food are thrown away in America, when it only takes 4 billion pounds to feed everyone in the country for a year,” he said. “California is capable of producing enough food for everyone in the world, but people go hungry in our own country. These are the antagonisms that we face today and that each and every one of you confronts on your watch.” Baptist used the rhetoric of the Declaration of Independence to highlight these unjust contradictions and urge his audience to take action to eliminate them. “Everyone is created equal … We all have the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. But how can you have the right to life if you don’t have a home or a decent job?” he said. “This immoral, irreligious contradiction we face challenges us to take a stand to do something like others in American history.” Baptist said his book, co-written with Union philosophy professor Jan Rehmann, challenges readers to consider their role in the fight against poverty. “What do you see is right or wrong? How will you live out your life?” Baptist said. “[The book] challenges us to take up Martin Luther King, Jr.’s manner and become real scholars through engaged scholarship, theology and intellectualism because poverty is a complex, globalized problem due to the current technological revolution that renders people superfluous to production worldwide.” Baptist said his experience as an organizer for the United Steelworkers laid the foundation for his efforts to organize the poor and homeless, especially in his work with the National Union of the Homeless. “When I organized with the [National] Union of the Homeless, we were working with 25 local unions in 25 states at its height,” Baptist said. “Union members were becoming homeless union members, and homeless people were organizing homeless people.” The public perception of homelessness as a self-inflicted condition has presented an obstacle to fighting the issue because it overlooks the knowledge and talents of homeless people, Baptist said. “Despite the public opinion of homeless people as those who can’t fight for themselves, there’s a rich reservoir of geniuses having to manipulate with meager means how to get from one day to another, but we allow that to lay waste in considering the consequences of poverty,” he said. Baptist, an African-American male who was once homeless, shared an anecdote about an encounter with a middle-aged Caucasian woman in Philadelphia in which his presence inflicted “the most God-awful fear in her eyes.” He said such encounters impede progress in American social relations. “Dr. King suggested that we have to somehow overcome the miseducation and stereotypes that exist that keep me from knowing the story of that lady and her knowing what my story is,” he said. “This is the challenge before us to keep our nation moving forward.”last_img read more

Read more…

Panel showcases legal careers

first_img Director of Career Crossings Stacie Jeffirs said she values the insight alumnae involved in various professions can offer to students interested in those jobs.   “Thinking about pursuing a career in law is something very common for our students to think about,” Jeffirs said. “Panels, like this, offers students networking opportunities and show students just how passionate our alumnae are about their careers.” Jeffirs moderated the panel, which included a discussion on a wide range of topics. Each panelist began by describing the unique paths that led to their acceptances into law school. “From a very young age I always knew I wanted to be a lawyer,” Janet Horvath, a current partner at Jones Obenchain, LLP of South Bend, said. Kristina Campbell, associate professor of law at the University of District Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, said her path to law was “by no means direct.” “I pursued other programs after I graduated from Saint Mary’s,” she said. “Ultimately, I knew I wanted to be active in social justice and a law degree is a great tool for instigating social change. I was an idealist hoping to change the world through law.” MaryBeth Wilkinson, assistant general counsel of Owens-Illinois, Inc. said she joined law for the sole reason of “making money.””I grew up on a small farm in Michigan and wanted a ticket out,” Wilkinson said. “I joined law to make money, but over the years I have developed a strong passion for litigation. Litigation is like a war-zone or a game. I love being a part of this game.” Horvath said she truly loves her job working in insurance defense and litigation. “Not only do I work in a family friendly place where I can balance my family and my job, but I love going into work and knowing I am taking a burden away from other individuals,” she said. “When someone passes away in the family or a business needs to be passed down, a lot of people do not know what to do. I am there for those people, and it is truly rewarding.” Campbell said she became better equipped to tackle the challenges associated with working in an adversarial profession because of the challenges she overcame as a woman beginning work as a lawyer.     “The law profession, litigation in particular, is very adversarial. You really need to have tough skin and not let little criticisms bother you,” Campbell said. “I often look back on my career as a young female lawyer and think about how my gender was actually an advantage. People underestimated me and it turned out to work in my favor.” The panelists said women have made significant strides in the legal field.  Wilkinson said she believes the legal profession asks its lawyers to handle great responsibility. “Law is one of the most powerful positions you can be in, especially for women,” she said. “As a lawyer and as a professional, all you really have is your reputation. You can’t fake integrity and you can’t fake ethics.” Wilkinson said the two most important assets to have when pursuing any profession – not only law – are integrity and passion for the job. “Know yourself inside and out,” Campbell said. “My Saint Mary’s liberal arts education prepared me for the real world because I was well aware of my own personal values. With these values I could then start a career in immigration law that I now love.” Horvath said students should begin to search for opportunities now. “We are here to help facilitate your pursuits,” she said. “Don’t be afraid to speak up and take advantage of the different opportunities this college has to offer. We all cannot repeat enough that we are here for you. We want to see you succeed.” Saint Mary’s alumnae in the legal profession advised students interested in law about how best to pursue a career the field in a panel discussion Tuesday night.The panel, titled “Women in Law: The Lawyer Alumnae Panel” featured three alumnae from all different sectors of the field.last_img read more

Read more…

Sutton Foster Will Headline Sweet Charity Off-Broadway

first_imgSutton Foster(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Two-time Tony winner Sutton Foster will headline a 50th anniversary revival of Sweet Charity this fall. The production will kick off the New Group’s 2016-17 off-Broadway season. Also on the lineup is the U.S. premiere of Wallace Shawn’s Evening at the Talk House and world premieres by Erica Schmidt and Hamish Linklater.Sweet Charity will begin performances in November. Leigh Silverman, who directed Foster in the recent revival of Violet, is set to helm the production; Joshua Bergasse will choreograph. The Cy Coleman, Dorothy Fields and Neil Simon musical follows the romantic ups and downs of Charity, a dance hall performer in Times Square. The tuner premiered on Broadway in 1966 and was last revived in New York in 2005.Foster’s stage credits include Tony-winning turns in Anything Goes and Thoroughly Modern Millie, as well as Violet, Shrek, Young Frankenstein and The Drowsy Chaperone. Fans can catch her as 40-year-old-but-pretending-to-be-26 Liza Miller on TV Land’s Younger, which is set to return for a third season next year, as well as the upcoming Netflix revival of Gilmore Girls.Beginning January 2017, the New Group will present Shawn’s Evening at the Talk House, helmed by artistic director Scott Elliott. The play explores the reunion of a group of actors and a playwright on the tenth anniversary of their flop. It first premiered at the U.K.’s National Theatre in 2015.Next, Schmidt will helm the world premiere of her play All the Fine Boys. The show is set in a South Carolina suburb in the late ‘80s and follows fourteen-year-old best friends Jenny and Emily as they contemplate their sexual awakening. Performances will start in February 2017.The season concludes with Linklater’s The Whirligig, featuring Girls star and off-Broadway alum Zosia Mamet and recent Golden Globe winner Maura Tierney. Elliott will direct the production, which begins previews in May 2017. Tierney will star as Kristina, who heads back to Berkshire County to care for her estranged daughter alongside her ex-husband. As word of her return travels, several familiar faces, including her childhood best friend Trish (Mamet), attempt to reconnect.Performances of the four productions are set for the Pershing Square Signature Center. Additional casting and creative team members will be announced at a later date. View Commentslast_img read more

Read more…

Vermont’s largest solar installation to be commissioned tomorrow in South Burlington

first_imgAllEarth Renewables, Inc.,Just four miles from where they were designed and manufactured, 382 solar trackers composed of more than 9,000 individual panels make up Vermont’s largest solar installation — which will be commissioned tomorrow, July 27 with the touch of an iPhone. The project is the largest solar farm of its kind in all of North America.Joined by Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin, Lt. Governor Phil Scott, and House Speaker Shap Smith, the Williston-based AllEarth Renewables will host the businesses and partners that had a hand in building the 2.2 MW solar farm. The project, part of the state’s innovative Standard Offer program, uses the Vermont-made AllSun Tracker ‘ pole-mounted solar energy systems that use GPS and wireless technology to orient with the sun throughout the day to produce more energy than fixed solar.Featured guests include more than 75 suppliers, electricians, engineers, contractors and other workers that helped make the project happen.What: Commissioning of Vermont’s largest solar installation, a 2.2 MW solar tracker farmWhen: TOMORROW, Wednesday, July 27 at 2pmWhere: 350 Dubois Lane, South Burlington (just off of Route 116)last_img read more

Read more…

President Obama signs Leahy-Smith America Invents Act on patent reform

first_imgVermont Senator Patrick Leahy witnessed the signing of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act at an event in Alexandria, Virginia, today.  President Barack Obama signed the bill into law, capping a six-year bipartisan effort led by Leahy to enact the first comprehensive reforms to the nation’s patent system in nearly six decades. Vermont has the highest number of patents per capita in the nation.‘Vermonters have a long legacy of innovation and creativity.  With the improvements included in the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, that legacy is sure to continue. ‘Few efforts in Washington enjoy the broad, bipartisan support that this law has received.   I thank President Obama, former Secretary Locke and Director Kappos, for their leadership and their support of American innovation.  The America Invents Act is a bipartisan jobs initiative at a time when we need it the most.  It is an example of what Democrats and Republicans can do when we work together for the American people.  ‘The reforms included in this law will have a meaningful impact on American entrepreneurs and inventors for generations to come.  The America Invents Act will promote job creation and innovation, in the Green Mountains of Vermont and across the country, and I thank the President for signing it into law today.’ September 16, 2011last_img read more

Read more…

The Brazilian Air Force’s First Female Fighter Jet Pilot Flies Presidential Airplane

first_imgBy Taciana Moury/Diálogo March 31, 2017 Aircraft Pilot Captain Carla Alexandre Borges is a symbol of female presence in the Brazilian Air Force (FAB, per its Portuguese acronym). A member of the first class of women at the Air Force Academy (AFA, per its Portuguese acronym) in 2003, her career has continued to be a series of firsts. She was the first female Brazilian pilot to fly an A-1 jet fighter, and since the end of 2016, she has become the first woman to fly Brazil’s presidential aircraft. “It’s both an honor and a responsibility to transport the president of Brazil, our country’s highest authority,” said Capt. Carla. Flying an Airbus A-319 is very different from flying fighter aircraft. “While transporting public officials, the goal is to ensure a calm, careful flight, avoiding all types of disturbances or turbulence, since the official is often working on board,” she explained. Capt. Carla earned her wings on this aircraft after 150 hours of training flights, and 60 hours on simulator missions. She was selected by a council made up of members of the Special Transport Group to fly the presidential aircraft. “Whenever an opening comes up, applicants apply and go before the council,” she added. A girl’s childhood dream Being a military pilot was her childhood dream. Growing up in Jundiaí, a town in upstate São Paulo, Capt. Carla loved going to the city’s flying club to watch flights, and she had a room full of posters and miniature airplanes. “I’ve always loved aviation, but what I wanted the most was to be a fighter pilot. Back in the day, there weren’t any female pilots in FAB, but when the first class of women was admitted, I was right there with them,” she recalled. It took many years of dedication and study to make her fighter pilot dream a reality. Capt. Carla studied for four years at AFA in Pirassununga, where she piloted the T-25 and T-27. She went on to Natal in Rio Grande do Norte, spending one year completing the basic fighter pilot course. Only then was she assigned to the First Squadron of the Third Aviation Group (1º/3º GAv, per its Portuguese acronym) in Boa Vista, in the north of Brazil, where she began flying a Super Tucano turboprop. “The mission of the 1º/3º GAv is to protect Brazil’s airspace along the border. I took part in all kinds of air defense operations in the squadron, like Ágata and Cruzex. But my focus was to progress as a fighter pilot,” she said. The goal was to pilot a front-line aircraft. In her case, the A-1, with speeds of up to 900 km/hour, missile-carrying capacity, and 30-mm ammunition. To get there, then-Lieutenant Carla had to complete a two-year squadron leadership course. “It’s a prerequisite being part of a front-line squadron, leading up to four fighter aircraft,” Capt. Carla explained. After completing the course, she was transferred to the First Squadron of the 16th Aviation Group (1º/16º GAv per its Portuguese acronym) at the Santa Cruz Air Base in Rio de Janeiro, to enroll in the A-1 aircraft course. The 1º/16º GAv required even more of the captain’s dedication, with physical preparation and lots of studying. “Powerful aircraft like the A-1 require detailed planning before every flight since the speed demands their pilots to make quick decisions,” she explained. The pilots have to deal with G-forces (caused by the aircraft’s acceleration) up to six times their body weight. Eight years after graduation, in May of 2011, Capt. Carla made her dream a reality by taking her first solo flight on a FAB A-1 jet. Even now, she still recalls the thrill of that flight, which departed from the Santa Cruz Air Base in Rio de Janeiro. “I made my lifelong dream come true of piloting the most modern fighter jet in operation in my country. Flying a fighter jet is a unique sensation of freedom and power. It was a really important stage that I completed in my life,” she emphasized. Capt. Carla’s career path has served as an example, as well as encouragement for other women who have decided to follow in her footsteps. She is proud to know that she has contributed to the solidification of women’s roles in FAB. “A lot of barriers have been brought down since 2003 when the path was opened for women in aviation within FAB. A lot of women are on this path and others will continue to follow. It’s an enthralling profession but it takes a lot of focus and dedication,” she noted. Women in the Brazilian Armed Forces FAB leads the way in female personnel in comparison to the other services. Women make up 16 percent of the Air Force; 10 percent of the Navy; and 4.2 percent of the Army. According to Ministry of Defense data, there are 28,512 women serving in the Armed Forces. To address these differences and expand policy for women in military professions, the ministry set up the Ministry of Defense Gender Commission (CGMD per its Portuguese acronym) in 2014. The commission has direct ties to UN Women – an entity created by the United Nations to encourage gender equality and empower women – in Brasilia and actively promotes expansion and gender equality in the Armed Forces. According to R1 Brigadier General Antônio Carlos Alves Coutinho, the head of the CGMD, Brazil is still one of the last countries in the world, in all areas of operation, to open opportunities for women. “In the three Americas, Brazil is the country with the most restrictions on female participation in the Armed Forces, especially with regard to ‘combat-related’ tasks. In almost every other country, the condition for entry and progress in a career is determined by individual skill and merit,” he said. In 2017, the top two military academies of the Brazilian Air Force and Army began accepting women: the Preparatory School of Air Cadets in Barbacena, in the state of Minas Gerais, and the Army Cadet Preparatory School (EsPCEx, per its Portuguese acronym), in Resende, Rio de Janeiro. Brig. Gen. Coutinho emphasized that opening new ways for women to be admitted represents a step in the right direction but there is still much to improve upon. “The Armed Forces set quotas for women at the institution, keeping more women from joining. For example, at EsPCEx, of the 440 spots available, only 40 were set aside for women,” he said. Brig. Gen. Coutinho explained that CGMD tries to combat prejudice with scientific approaches and demonstrations of positive results in other countries. He noted that the number of women in the Armed Forces has increased but the commission’s goal is to knock down all barriers to female entry. “A woman’s place is wherever she wants to be. If a woman wants to be in the infantry, to lead a warship, or to fly combat aircraft, then that possibility should be allowed,” he said. He thinks that, regardless of gender, whoever passes the selection process established by the service branch to perform a task is qualified to join. “The day we accomplish that, the CGMD can be shut down because it will be proof that women are no longer being discriminated against in the military.”last_img read more

Read more…

How using social media can save you money

first_imgIt likely comes at no surprise that Americans spend a lot of time on social media. Engaging with social platforms represents close to 20 percent of all time spent online in the U.S., with Facebook taking an overwhelming share of our collective attention, according to a report from comScore, a company that measures audiences, brands and consumer behavior. In fact, digital consumer insight company GlobalWebIndex found the average adult spends nearly two hours each day on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and social messaging platforms.What was once a fun way to interact with friends and family has launched into a primary source of news, media and brand engagement for millions of Americans. Advertising has become a cornerstone of the revenue-building strategies for most social platforms, with Facebook reporting $6.24 billion in ad sales last quarter alone.Since advertisements are customized to appeal to individual users, it seems more likely that social media can help you spend money rather than save it. However, the following strategies demonstrate how platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter, can actually help users spend less on everything from fashion to home furnishings. continue reading » 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Read more…

Skelos Corruption Trial: State Pol’s Reluctance on Reform Aired

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York New York State Sen. Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) laughed when asked if campaign finance reform might pass the state legislature, a billionaire developer’s lawyer testified at the senator’s corruption trial.The anecdote was just one of many heard at the trial that showed the way ethics reforms are treated behind the scenes in corruption-prone Albany. In another, the former chair of the state Senate ethics committee, Tony Avella, recalled on the stand that in his role he found it impossible to make real change.But the real estate industry was most concerned that the state might pass legislation to close the so-called LLC loophole, which allows businesses to skirt campaign donation limits by issuing checks from various limited liability corporations to disguise their source.“That’s how we get our voice out,” said Charles Durego, general counsel and Senior Vice President at New Hyde Park-based developer Glenwood Management Corp., the biggest political donor statewide, last week during Skelos’ trial at Manhattan federal court.Glenwood, owned by billionaire Leonard Litwin, is one of three companies that Skelos, the former state Senate Majority Leader, allegedly coerced to get $300,000 in bribes. They took the form of no-show jobs that his son, Adam, was unqualified for in exchange for illegally manipulating legislation. Both men deny the accusations.Durego said he asked Skelos the LLC loophole question on behalf of the Real Estate Board of New York, a group representing landlords and developers, which was also concerned about the possibility it would pass.In general, Democrats favor closing the LLC loophole because Republicans mostly benefit from those donations, prosecutors noted, adding that the GOP would rather make illegal other types of donations that Democrats mostly receive. As a result, the reform effort ends in a legislative stalemate.State Sen. Tony Avella (D-Queens), one of the witnesses to testify at the Skelos trial, said that when he joined the Independent Democratic Conference (IDC), a small group of senate Democrats who caucused with the Republicans in a power-sharing agreement, he was named chair of the Senate ethics committee. First elected in 2011, Avella said that as chair of that committee he quickly learned that talk of ethical reforms in Albany did not see any follow through.“No bills had ever been referred to that committee, and no bills ever came out of [that] committee,” he said on the stand. When Avella decided to hold a hearing on the issue instead, he was told it had to be postponed.Even now, with both Skelos and his former counterpart, ex-Speaker of the Assembly Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan), on trial for similar but unrelated corruption charges in the same courthouse at the same time, state lawmakers remain reluctant to pass any additional proposed reforms, such as enacting term limits or stripping convicted lawmakers of their pensions, beyond making a few changes to disclosing outside income which passed earlier this year.Last week, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie (D-Bronx), Silver’s replacement, told reporters that further reforms are unlikely, according to Capital New York.Skelos’ replacement as state Senate Majority Leader, Sen. John Flanagan (R-Northport), reportedly shares Heastie’s view.One reason why the sentiment prevails may be found in phone calls between the senator and his son that the FBI recorded. In one exchange played in court, Adam criticized his father for working with the Democrats in the IDC, but Dean reminded his son to take the long view.“I have to think about the next election,” the senator reminded him.In between the push-pull of prosecutors and defense lawyers making their cases, the corruption trail of New York State Sen. Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) details how much money and politics remain intertwined.last_img read more

Read more…