Category: bmrxcjkks

Pembroke students rescue Christ Church girl

first_imgA girl from Christ Church was found unconscious and with severe injuries after a night out.The second-year was discovered lying in the middle of Pembroke Street, bleeding from the head.She was with a fresher who was trying, unsuccessfully, to pull her up from the ground, whilst cars were driving past.They were discovered by two third years, Ashley Grossmann and Caroline Stevens, who were on their way back from the bar at about 11.30pm.Stevens described how, seeing that the two were in trouble, Grossmann went into the middle of the road and successfully carried the injured girl off the road.She said that the girl had appeared to have slipped and smashed her head on a drain, which was also drenched in blood, and was bleeding heavily from the back of her head.Stevens recounts that she and Grossmann were “a bit concerned” as the injured girl was not responding to anything and her breathing was “erratic”: “she didn’t know where she was or who she was”.Grossman and Stevens phoned for an ambulance and had to carry out first aid over the phone until more help arrived.The girl was taken to the John Radcliffe hospital and had to be kept overnight.Grossmann who saved the girl from the road last Friday said it was “no big deal” and that “any guy who saw it would have done the same”.A spokesperson for the Oxfordshire ambulance services warned of the dangers of drinking following the incident. She said, “all over the country, there have been peaks of activity during fresher’s week.”“We understand that people want to go out, have a good time and do whatever but they have to be careful“Our call rates have gone up in the last few weeks and drunken accidents really make the difference.”last_img read more

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Meeting on Drainage Plan for 26th to 34th Streets Set for Tuesday

first_imgBarricades block access to Simpson and Haven avenues at 32nd Street in Ocean City — a common precaution in many storms each year.A neighborhood meeting to discuss plans for road and drainage improvements between 26th and 34th streets is scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 4, at the Senior Center in the Ocean City Community Center.Michael Baker International Company has completed a $44,720 study of how best to remediate drainage problems in the low-elevation area bounded by 26th and 34th streets, West Avenue and Bay Avenue.The area sits in a low-lying corridor that includes Haven and Simpson avenues and routinely floods — not only in storms and tidal events, but in heavy rain and even on sunny days (with tidal waters flowing backwards through the storm drain system).Sign up for free breaking news updates from Ocean City.Get Ocean City updates in your Facebook news feed. “Like” us.Baker — the same firm that planned a comprehensive drainage project for Merion Park — has met with the city administration to discuss its recommendations, and the Tuesday public meeting will present the plan and solicit feedback from property owners in the new project area.City Council already has appropriated funding for the roads and drainage work in its 2014 road improvement plan. Additional work is included in a bond ordinance that passed on first reading on Thursday (July 23). Council appropriated $1,050,000 for new phases of work in the city’s 2015 road and drainage improvement program.See PDF below for complete detail on the $7.9 million 2015 road and drainage plan.Download (PDF, 204KB)last_img read more

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Help Identify the Man Who Allegedly Stole $400 in Cigarettes from Ocean City Sunoco

first_imgPolice are searching for this man, who entered the Sunoco Gas Station on 34th Street and West Avenue Monday morning and allegedly stole cartons of Marlboro cigarettes. (Photo courtesy Ocean City Police Department) A man walked into the Sunoco Gas Station at 34th Street and West Avenue in Ocean City at 9:02 a.m. Monday, took cartons of Marlboro cigarettes totaling $400, and ran off, Captain Steve Ang, public information officer, said Tuesday.The Ocean City Police Department received a call for a reported theft at the gas station. According to police, the suspect committed the crime, then headed east on foot toward Asbury Avenue.The suspect is described as a white male, approximately 25 to 30 years old, wearing a dark colored hooded sweatshirt and jeans. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call the Ocean City Police Department at (609) 399-9111. A suspect walked into the Sunoco on 34th Street and stole hundreds of dollars worth of cigarettes. (Photo Courtesy Ocean City Police Department)last_img read more

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Snarky Puppy Shares Live Footage From Norweigan Jazz Festival [Watch]

first_imgAny fan of funky good music is certainly aware of Snarky Puppy, the Grammy-winning jazz collective that never fails to incite a jammed out boogie. The band recently made their way to Europe for a tour, which included a stop at the SildaJazz – Haugesund International Jazz Festival in Haugesund, Norway. Led by Michael League, the band has shared some great footage from their European festival for our viewing pleasure.Watch Snarky Puppy hard at work, below. Snarky Puppy also recently announced their very first music festival! Check out more information about that here.[Photo via Dave Vann/Jam Cruise 14]last_img

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GSD’s Kara wins Stirling Prize for building

first_imgThe Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has awarded its 2018 Stirling Prize to Foster + Partners’ “monumental,” “once-in-a-generation” European headquarters for Bloomberg LP, a project engineered by the Harvard Graduate School of Design’s (GSD) Hanif Kara and his firm AKTII. The Stirling Prize is RIBA’s most prestigious award, given annually to a new building in the United Kingdom deemed to have made the most significant contribution to British architecture in the past year.The 2018 Stirling Prize jury, chaired by Sir David Adjaye OBE and unanimous in its choice, said, “The design process involved unprecedented levels of research, innovation and experimentation, with pioneering new details and techniques tested, prototyped – sometimes at 1:1 scale – and rigorously improved.”Foster + Partners served as architect for the project, with AKTII as civil and structural engineer and Kara as design director. The project was conceived in close dialogue with Michael Bloomberg, CEO of Bloomberg LP, and his New York-based team. Foster + Partners and AKTII were appointed to deliver the project from conception through to construction, enriching it with a conceptual and architectural continuity that Kara says lies at the heart of his GSD pedagogy.“The ‘thought-to-construction’ element gives architects the opportunity to allow the research on and nature of the project to balance out and inform the selection of experts and other collaborators, rather than it being predetermined,” Kara observes.”This is a question I have dealt with in my GSD courses, especially in ‘Interdisciplinary Design in Practice’: how design research manifests itself beyond academia, and the advocacy that architects must apply in order to understand the project not just as a building, but to draw on what they want built.”Kara notes a variety of technical innovations that position the headquarters as an exemplar of the “work space of the future,” one that promotes personal well-being for inhabitants, environmental sustainability (RIBA writes that the building has been credited as the most sustainable office in the world), and employee productivity and idea-sharing.“These are topics we all deal with at school in our teaching and in debates that we have about the challenges the next generations face, and how great design can steward that,” Kara says. “The optimistic arc the project sets is a direct message to our students and alumni.”Unlike many office buildings, services like elevators and staircases are pushed to the building’s edges so workspaces for meeting and collaborating form the core of the building. Inside, a 210-meter high, triple-helix, bronze ramp leads upstairs, with a width that allows for spontaneous gatherings and conversations without impeding foot traffic. Throughout, systems for power, lighting, water, and ventilation make reuse of waste and respond to the building’s external climate as well as its internal occupancy patterns. The building’s multi-function ceilings are fitted with 2.5 million polished aluminum “petals” that work to regulate temperature, light, and sound.“It is difficult to separate architecture from engineering, and design from construction, with this project,” Kara observes.”That is its greatest achievement.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Activist shares story of poverty

first_imgAuthor, activist and scholar Willie Baptist highlighted the serious challenges America faces in the fight against poverty and homelessness when he shared his personal experiences with poverty during a Monday discussion. The Higgins Labor Studies Program sponsored the talk, which was held in Geddes Hall. In his introduction of Baptist, John Wessel-McCoy, an organizer for the Poverty Initiative and Poverty Scholars program at New York City’s Union Theological Seminary, said the program’s mission “came out of the great history of organizing what Willie Baptist embodies.” “[The Poverty Initiative] is dedicated to raising up generations of religious and community leaders committed to building a social movement to end poverty led by the poor,” Wessel-McCoy said. “We don’t want to make it kinder, gentler or slightly better. We want to end it.” Wessel-McCoy said mobilizing the poor to fight systemic causes of poverty is crucial to American social progress and the elimination of the growing wealth gap. “We have the productive capacity and means to … lift the load of poverty, and the fact that we have growing ranks of poor in America is what we feel is the defining issue of our time,” he said. “We must build a network of leaders who are organizing, working in congregations as religious leaders and engaging the plight and fight of the poor.” In a short film promoting his book “Pedagogy of the Poor,” Baptist, a formerly homeless father who now serves as the scholar-in-residence of the Poverty Initiative, said the poverty organizing movement must address root causes of American poverty to find a solution. “We have to look at the root structure of what produced the problem … The polarity of wealth and poverty in America means that the people most affected by it need to organize and be educated to solve problems,” he said. “Poverty scholarship is an understanding of the complexity and globalized character of poverty.” According to the film, the polarity in wealth distribution has led to a situation of “abandonment alongside abundance,” in which the top five percent of American earners have enjoyed unprecedented gains in wealth in recent years, while 46 million Americans live below the poverty line and one-third of the population lives on incomes just above that threshold. Baptist said this and several other contradictions characterize the reality of American poverty. “Every year, 46 billion pounds of food are thrown away in America, when it only takes 4 billion pounds to feed everyone in the country for a year,” he said. “California is capable of producing enough food for everyone in the world, but people go hungry in our own country. These are the antagonisms that we face today and that each and every one of you confronts on your watch.” Baptist used the rhetoric of the Declaration of Independence to highlight these unjust contradictions and urge his audience to take action to eliminate them. “Everyone is created equal … We all have the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. But how can you have the right to life if you don’t have a home or a decent job?” he said. “This immoral, irreligious contradiction we face challenges us to take a stand to do something like others in American history.” Baptist said his book, co-written with Union philosophy professor Jan Rehmann, challenges readers to consider their role in the fight against poverty. “What do you see is right or wrong? How will you live out your life?” Baptist said. “[The book] challenges us to take up Martin Luther King, Jr.’s manner and become real scholars through engaged scholarship, theology and intellectualism because poverty is a complex, globalized problem due to the current technological revolution that renders people superfluous to production worldwide.” Baptist said his experience as an organizer for the United Steelworkers laid the foundation for his efforts to organize the poor and homeless, especially in his work with the National Union of the Homeless. “When I organized with the [National] Union of the Homeless, we were working with 25 local unions in 25 states at its height,” Baptist said. “Union members were becoming homeless union members, and homeless people were organizing homeless people.” The public perception of homelessness as a self-inflicted condition has presented an obstacle to fighting the issue because it overlooks the knowledge and talents of homeless people, Baptist said. “Despite the public opinion of homeless people as those who can’t fight for themselves, there’s a rich reservoir of geniuses having to manipulate with meager means how to get from one day to another, but we allow that to lay waste in considering the consequences of poverty,” he said. Baptist, an African-American male who was once homeless, shared an anecdote about an encounter with a middle-aged Caucasian woman in Philadelphia in which his presence inflicted “the most God-awful fear in her eyes.” He said such encounters impede progress in American social relations. “Dr. King suggested that we have to somehow overcome the miseducation and stereotypes that exist that keep me from knowing the story of that lady and her knowing what my story is,” he said. “This is the challenge before us to keep our nation moving forward.”last_img read more

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Panel showcases legal careers

first_img Director of Career Crossings Stacie Jeffirs said she values the insight alumnae involved in various professions can offer to students interested in those jobs.   “Thinking about pursuing a career in law is something very common for our students to think about,” Jeffirs said. “Panels, like this, offers students networking opportunities and show students just how passionate our alumnae are about their careers.” Jeffirs moderated the panel, which included a discussion on a wide range of topics. Each panelist began by describing the unique paths that led to their acceptances into law school. “From a very young age I always knew I wanted to be a lawyer,” Janet Horvath, a current partner at Jones Obenchain, LLP of South Bend, said. Kristina Campbell, associate professor of law at the University of District Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, said her path to law was “by no means direct.” “I pursued other programs after I graduated from Saint Mary’s,” she said. “Ultimately, I knew I wanted to be active in social justice and a law degree is a great tool for instigating social change. I was an idealist hoping to change the world through law.” MaryBeth Wilkinson, assistant general counsel of Owens-Illinois, Inc. said she joined law for the sole reason of “making money.””I grew up on a small farm in Michigan and wanted a ticket out,” Wilkinson said. “I joined law to make money, but over the years I have developed a strong passion for litigation. Litigation is like a war-zone or a game. I love being a part of this game.” Horvath said she truly loves her job working in insurance defense and litigation. “Not only do I work in a family friendly place where I can balance my family and my job, but I love going into work and knowing I am taking a burden away from other individuals,” she said. “When someone passes away in the family or a business needs to be passed down, a lot of people do not know what to do. I am there for those people, and it is truly rewarding.” Campbell said she became better equipped to tackle the challenges associated with working in an adversarial profession because of the challenges she overcame as a woman beginning work as a lawyer.     “The law profession, litigation in particular, is very adversarial. You really need to have tough skin and not let little criticisms bother you,” Campbell said. “I often look back on my career as a young female lawyer and think about how my gender was actually an advantage. People underestimated me and it turned out to work in my favor.” The panelists said women have made significant strides in the legal field.  Wilkinson said she believes the legal profession asks its lawyers to handle great responsibility. “Law is one of the most powerful positions you can be in, especially for women,” she said. “As a lawyer and as a professional, all you really have is your reputation. You can’t fake integrity and you can’t fake ethics.” Wilkinson said the two most important assets to have when pursuing any profession – not only law – are integrity and passion for the job. “Know yourself inside and out,” Campbell said. “My Saint Mary’s liberal arts education prepared me for the real world because I was well aware of my own personal values. With these values I could then start a career in immigration law that I now love.” Horvath said students should begin to search for opportunities now. “We are here to help facilitate your pursuits,” she said. “Don’t be afraid to speak up and take advantage of the different opportunities this college has to offer. We all cannot repeat enough that we are here for you. We want to see you succeed.” Saint Mary’s alumnae in the legal profession advised students interested in law about how best to pursue a career the field in a panel discussion Tuesday night.The panel, titled “Women in Law: The Lawyer Alumnae Panel” featured three alumnae from all different sectors of the field.last_img read more

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Sutton Foster Will Headline Sweet Charity Off-Broadway

first_imgSutton Foster(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Two-time Tony winner Sutton Foster will headline a 50th anniversary revival of Sweet Charity this fall. The production will kick off the New Group’s 2016-17 off-Broadway season. Also on the lineup is the U.S. premiere of Wallace Shawn’s Evening at the Talk House and world premieres by Erica Schmidt and Hamish Linklater.Sweet Charity will begin performances in November. Leigh Silverman, who directed Foster in the recent revival of Violet, is set to helm the production; Joshua Bergasse will choreograph. The Cy Coleman, Dorothy Fields and Neil Simon musical follows the romantic ups and downs of Charity, a dance hall performer in Times Square. The tuner premiered on Broadway in 1966 and was last revived in New York in 2005.Foster’s stage credits include Tony-winning turns in Anything Goes and Thoroughly Modern Millie, as well as Violet, Shrek, Young Frankenstein and The Drowsy Chaperone. Fans can catch her as 40-year-old-but-pretending-to-be-26 Liza Miller on TV Land’s Younger, which is set to return for a third season next year, as well as the upcoming Netflix revival of Gilmore Girls.Beginning January 2017, the New Group will present Shawn’s Evening at the Talk House, helmed by artistic director Scott Elliott. The play explores the reunion of a group of actors and a playwright on the tenth anniversary of their flop. It first premiered at the U.K.’s National Theatre in 2015.Next, Schmidt will helm the world premiere of her play All the Fine Boys. The show is set in a South Carolina suburb in the late ‘80s and follows fourteen-year-old best friends Jenny and Emily as they contemplate their sexual awakening. Performances will start in February 2017.The season concludes with Linklater’s The Whirligig, featuring Girls star and off-Broadway alum Zosia Mamet and recent Golden Globe winner Maura Tierney. Elliott will direct the production, which begins previews in May 2017. Tierney will star as Kristina, who heads back to Berkshire County to care for her estranged daughter alongside her ex-husband. As word of her return travels, several familiar faces, including her childhood best friend Trish (Mamet), attempt to reconnect.Performances of the four productions are set for the Pershing Square Signature Center. Additional casting and creative team members will be announced at a later date. View Commentslast_img read more

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Vermont’s largest solar installation to be commissioned tomorrow in South Burlington

first_imgAllEarth Renewables, Inc.,Just four miles from where they were designed and manufactured, 382 solar trackers composed of more than 9,000 individual panels make up Vermont’s largest solar installation — which will be commissioned tomorrow, July 27 with the touch of an iPhone. The project is the largest solar farm of its kind in all of North America.Joined by Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin, Lt. Governor Phil Scott, and House Speaker Shap Smith, the Williston-based AllEarth Renewables will host the businesses and partners that had a hand in building the 2.2 MW solar farm. The project, part of the state’s innovative Standard Offer program, uses the Vermont-made AllSun Tracker ‘ pole-mounted solar energy systems that use GPS and wireless technology to orient with the sun throughout the day to produce more energy than fixed solar.Featured guests include more than 75 suppliers, electricians, engineers, contractors and other workers that helped make the project happen.What: Commissioning of Vermont’s largest solar installation, a 2.2 MW solar tracker farmWhen: TOMORROW, Wednesday, July 27 at 2pmWhere: 350 Dubois Lane, South Burlington (just off of Route 116)last_img read more

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President Obama signs Leahy-Smith America Invents Act on patent reform

first_imgVermont Senator Patrick Leahy witnessed the signing of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act at an event in Alexandria, Virginia, today.  President Barack Obama signed the bill into law, capping a six-year bipartisan effort led by Leahy to enact the first comprehensive reforms to the nation’s patent system in nearly six decades. Vermont has the highest number of patents per capita in the nation.‘Vermonters have a long legacy of innovation and creativity.  With the improvements included in the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, that legacy is sure to continue. ‘Few efforts in Washington enjoy the broad, bipartisan support that this law has received.   I thank President Obama, former Secretary Locke and Director Kappos, for their leadership and their support of American innovation.  The America Invents Act is a bipartisan jobs initiative at a time when we need it the most.  It is an example of what Democrats and Republicans can do when we work together for the American people.  ‘The reforms included in this law will have a meaningful impact on American entrepreneurs and inventors for generations to come.  The America Invents Act will promote job creation and innovation, in the Green Mountains of Vermont and across the country, and I thank the President for signing it into law today.’ September 16, 2011last_img read more

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