Next Stop on the RSA Express: Abu Dhabi

first_imgI’m incredibly excited about attending RSA’s next conference, which will be held November 4-5 in Abu Dhabi. This marks the first time we’re holding a conference in the region and I certainly hope we’ll have many more. Let me tell you why.As I look at RSA’s overall business, I’m especially interested in newly burgeoning security markets. Areas of rapid economic growth are compelling because they are not as encumbered by legacy constraints. Rather, security investments can be allocated to the right areas and address the challenges posed by the current threat landscape. In contrast, because old habits die hard, more mature markets tend to focus their security spending on traditional mechanisms. Such mechanisms include perimeter-based approaches that are predicated on trying to prevent threats outright.While threat prevention is an important component of an overall security strategy, it is often over-emphasized relative to areas like incident detection and response. Don’t get me wrong, all three areas are critical. That said, the returns on prevention-based approaches rapidly diminish. At best, investing in better mousetraps will not move the needle appreciably; at worst it can be an abysmal failure.My belief is that the right budget involves a more equitable apportioning among prevention, detection, and response. In fact, Gartner believes that by 2020, over 60% of the IT Security spend will be allocated to detection and response (up from just 10% in 2014).  See, for example, this excellent blog post by Gartner Research VP Anton Chuvakin.Of course, this allocation is aspirational. But if you look at the way the threat landscape is trending, it’s clear that the industry needs to change its spending habits sooner rather than later.That’s why events like RSA Conference – Abu Dhabi are so important. In just the last few years, the UAE government created the Dubai Centre for E-Security to bring stakeholders together. And the region has become a go-to destination for hosting events and conferences, much like RSA’s. Armed with the right information, the right investments will follow.For these reasons and others, I’m very much looking forward to engaging with our customers and partners in Abu Dhabi — many of whom have been very forward thinking. I’ll also be hosting a panel on Wednesday where our customers will discuss what they are doing to stay ahead of the curve via technologies like RSA Security Analytics (effectively addressing the massive shortcomings of traditional SIEM tools).The deep, pervasive, and continuous visibility offered by technologies in our Advanced Security Operations Center (ASOC) portfolio such as Security Analytics is only one part of the triumvirate needed for addressing the threats that matter most. The other critical areas include comprehensive identity management (including authentication, access, lifecycle and governance) as well as risk management (including comprehensive governance, risk, and compliance). I’m sure there will be no shortage of fruitful discussions around all of these topics.If you’re attending the conference, please say hello! And be sure to follow my updates via Twitter (@zulfikar_ramzan).last_img read more

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#64: Dell EMC Core Technologies = Core Functionality with Stephan Voss

first_imgWhen most people think traditional EMC, or Dell EMC, they think Storage. While that is about to change, the foundation of the modern data center starts with the right storage array.  At VMWorld 2016, I had the opportunity to chat with Stephan Voss (@VossManVoss) Director of Technical Marketing, Dell EMC Core Technologies.  We talked XtremIO, Vmax Unity and storage software.  Software that brings functionality like iCDM (Integrated Copy Data Management), VMware enablement and application enablement.the Dell EMC merger and creation of Dell Technologies.Don’t miss “Dell EMC The Source” app in the App Store. Be sure to subscribe to Dell EMC The Source Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play and visit the official blog at thesourceblog.emc.comEMC: The Source Podcast is hosted by Sam Marraccini (@SamMarraccini)The Source Podcast: Episode ##64: Dell EMC Core Technologies = Core Functionality with Stephan VossAudio Playerhttp://traffic.libsyn.com/thesource/EMC_The_Source_Episode_64_audio.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.EMC: The Source Podcast is hosted By Sam Marraccini (@SamMarraccini)last_img read more

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High Availability: New Promotion to Ensure Business Continuity With Data Domain

first_imgToday’s business world demands continuous operations across the data center, including mission-critical data protection procedures. As some admins have learned the hard way, any amount of downtime can mean a loss in revenue and productivity for an organization. This is why business continuity has become a top IT priority for global enterprises – and why Dell EMC has implemented support for high availability configurations in our latest generation of Data Domain systems for midsized and large enterprises.High availability empowers organizations with greater resiliency through a second line of defense via Data Domain, ensuring continuous operations in the event of a failure. This month, Dell EMC has introduced a new promotion around high availability configurations for Data Domain systems, enabling customers to purchase their second controller at a 50% discount.By adding a second Data Domain controller to your protection storage investment, you create the active/standby configuration need to achieve high availability. During any unplanned system downtime, a simple failover between the two controllers is activated.Since the two controllers are attached to a shared storage pool, with one handling data ingestion and the other on standby, the backup jobs can resume in just minutes on the standby controller. Plus, this whole process can be easily monitored and managed via Data Domain System Manager. In addition to minimizing unexpected downtime, high availability configurations can also complete Data Domain Operating System upgrades without taking the system offline.Gain this feature with a new Data Domain DD9800, DD9300 or DD6800 that is preconfigured for high availability. Customers can purchase a second Data Domain controller at a 50% discount from Dell EMC and our partners now. The promotion will run through Friday, August 3, 2018. To learn more about Dell EMC Data Domain, please visit the Dell EMC Store to compare products and follow @DellEMCProtect on Twitter for the latest announcements, customer case studies and topical content.last_img read more

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Hungarian restaurant workers protest lockdown restrictions

first_imgBUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Protesters have gathered at a central square in Hungary’s capital of Budapest demanding a rethinking of the country’s coronavirus lockdown restrictions. Some entrepreneurs in the hospitality sector plan to open their doors to indoor dining on Monday, in defiance of strict pandemic restrictions. As the lockdown limiting restaurants to takeout service approaches the three-month mark, many business owners complain that they have received little to none of the government’s promised financial assistance while other businesses like shopping malls and retail stores have been permitted to remain open. Protest organizers have called for civil disobedience, and for the government to allow restaurants to open their doors.last_img

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Pandemic cuisine: Odd pairings, old favorites on the menu

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — Kimchi? Beets? Broccoli? The pandemic has had a strange impact on food cravings that goes beyond the joy of comfort eating. Nearly a year into isolation, many people are embracing foods they’d long forgotten or rejected. Others have forced themselves to re-evaluate despised, health-focused foods as a way to help boost their immune systems. And with home cooking at a high, many are feeling more adventurous in the kitchen. Suddenly, that organic lentil and mushroom soup that didn’t sound so appealing pre-pandemic has become part of weekly meal routines. Fermented foods are on trend. So are nostalgic, kid-friendly ones like raisins.last_img

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‘Eye of the storm’: Diverse east London grapples with virus

first_imgLONDON (AP) — In parts of east London, the pandemic has hit much harder than most places in the U.K. The borough of Redbridge in the outer reaches of the capital had the nation’s second-worst infection rate in January. While case rates have come down, leaders say the borough is still “in the eye of the storm.” Officials say the area’s dense housing, high levels of poverty and large number of workers in public-facing jobs combine to make it more vulnerable. Many of the lower-income essential workers are ethnic minorities, who are among the most at-risk but also hardest to persuade to take up the vaccine. Local health officials say they are racing against time to inoculate the poorest and hardest to reach communities.last_img

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Top football recruit James dies in Florida

first_imgJames, a 6-foot-6, 290-pound offensive tackle, was set to enroll in the fall as Kelly’s first major recruit at Notre Dame. The All-American chose the Irish on National Signing Day over Ohio State and Cincinnati. Police said James, 17, was “drunk” at the time of the fall, which occurred around 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Days Inn Motel in Panama City Beach. An autopsy showed James died of brain injuries. He was vacationing with six parents and 40 fellow students from St. Xavier High School in Cincinnati, Ohio, police said. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family and friends of Matt James in this most trying of times,” Kelly said in a statement Saturday. “On a personal level, I got to know Matt quite well over the past few years, and he was a wonderful young man from a great family. Matt was an extremely talented person who was very bright and possessed a great dry sense of humor. He could not wait to join the Notre Dame family.” “We are united in our grief over Matt,” St. Xavier president Fr. Tim Howe said in the release. “Our community is strong, and I know that the strength we receive from our faith in Jesus’ resurrection will help us get through this difficult time. Our love and prayers are for Matt and his family as we accompany them in the coming days of shared mourning.” Irish football coach Brian Kelly said his program was “in a state of disbelief and incredible sadness” following the tragic death of top recruit Matt James, who fell from a fifth-floor hotel balcony and died while on Spring Break in Panama City Beach, Fla., on Friday. Visitation will be held at St. Xavier High School on Friday from 4 to 8 p.m., and a funeral mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. Xavier Church in downtown Cincinnati, according to a Tuesday press release from the high school. “We would like to thank everyone for their prayers and support during this tragic time, particularly the family at St. X,” James’ parents, Jerry and Peggy, said in a statement Saturday. “Matt was a very special young man, and it is gratifying to us that you all could see that as well. We are touched by this outpouring of love.” James’ high school quarterback, Luke Massa, is an Irish commit and was also on the Spring Break trip, according to the AP. “This is just such a tragedy because he was just a wonderful, wonderful kid,” Massa’s mother, Mary, told the AP. “It’s heartbreaking.”last_img read more

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Activist shares story of poverty

first_imgAuthor, activist and scholar Willie Baptist highlighted the serious challenges America faces in the fight against poverty and homelessness when he shared his personal experiences with poverty during a Monday discussion. The Higgins Labor Studies Program sponsored the talk, which was held in Geddes Hall. In his introduction of Baptist, John Wessel-McCoy, an organizer for the Poverty Initiative and Poverty Scholars program at New York City’s Union Theological Seminary, said the program’s mission “came out of the great history of organizing what Willie Baptist embodies.” “[The Poverty Initiative] is dedicated to raising up generations of religious and community leaders committed to building a social movement to end poverty led by the poor,” Wessel-McCoy said. “We don’t want to make it kinder, gentler or slightly better. We want to end it.” Wessel-McCoy said mobilizing the poor to fight systemic causes of poverty is crucial to American social progress and the elimination of the growing wealth gap. “We have the productive capacity and means to … lift the load of poverty, and the fact that we have growing ranks of poor in America is what we feel is the defining issue of our time,” he said. “We must build a network of leaders who are organizing, working in congregations as religious leaders and engaging the plight and fight of the poor.” In a short film promoting his book “Pedagogy of the Poor,” Baptist, a formerly homeless father who now serves as the scholar-in-residence of the Poverty Initiative, said the poverty organizing movement must address root causes of American poverty to find a solution. “We have to look at the root structure of what produced the problem … The polarity of wealth and poverty in America means that the people most affected by it need to organize and be educated to solve problems,” he said. “Poverty scholarship is an understanding of the complexity and globalized character of poverty.” According to the film, the polarity in wealth distribution has led to a situation of “abandonment alongside abundance,” in which the top five percent of American earners have enjoyed unprecedented gains in wealth in recent years, while 46 million Americans live below the poverty line and one-third of the population lives on incomes just above that threshold. Baptist said this and several other contradictions characterize the reality of American poverty. “Every year, 46 billion pounds of food are thrown away in America, when it only takes 4 billion pounds to feed everyone in the country for a year,” he said. “California is capable of producing enough food for everyone in the world, but people go hungry in our own country. These are the antagonisms that we face today and that each and every one of you confronts on your watch.” Baptist used the rhetoric of the Declaration of Independence to highlight these unjust contradictions and urge his audience to take action to eliminate them. “Everyone is created equal … We all have the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. But how can you have the right to life if you don’t have a home or a decent job?” he said. “This immoral, irreligious contradiction we face challenges us to take a stand to do something like others in American history.” Baptist said his book, co-written with Union philosophy professor Jan Rehmann, challenges readers to consider their role in the fight against poverty. “What do you see is right or wrong? How will you live out your life?” Baptist said. “[The book] challenges us to take up Martin Luther King, Jr.’s manner and become real scholars through engaged scholarship, theology and intellectualism because poverty is a complex, globalized problem due to the current technological revolution that renders people superfluous to production worldwide.” Baptist said his experience as an organizer for the United Steelworkers laid the foundation for his efforts to organize the poor and homeless, especially in his work with the National Union of the Homeless. “When I organized with the [National] Union of the Homeless, we were working with 25 local unions in 25 states at its height,” Baptist said. “Union members were becoming homeless union members, and homeless people were organizing homeless people.” The public perception of homelessness as a self-inflicted condition has presented an obstacle to fighting the issue because it overlooks the knowledge and talents of homeless people, Baptist said. “Despite the public opinion of homeless people as those who can’t fight for themselves, there’s a rich reservoir of geniuses having to manipulate with meager means how to get from one day to another, but we allow that to lay waste in considering the consequences of poverty,” he said. Baptist, an African-American male who was once homeless, shared an anecdote about an encounter with a middle-aged Caucasian woman in Philadelphia in which his presence inflicted “the most God-awful fear in her eyes.” He said such encounters impede progress in American social relations. “Dr. King suggested that we have to somehow overcome the miseducation and stereotypes that exist that keep me from knowing the story of that lady and her knowing what my story is,” he said. “This is the challenge before us to keep our nation moving forward.”last_img read more

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Panel showcases legal careers

first_img Director of Career Crossings Stacie Jeffirs said she values the insight alumnae involved in various professions can offer to students interested in those jobs.   “Thinking about pursuing a career in law is something very common for our students to think about,” Jeffirs said. “Panels, like this, offers students networking opportunities and show students just how passionate our alumnae are about their careers.” Jeffirs moderated the panel, which included a discussion on a wide range of topics. Each panelist began by describing the unique paths that led to their acceptances into law school. “From a very young age I always knew I wanted to be a lawyer,” Janet Horvath, a current partner at Jones Obenchain, LLP of South Bend, said. Kristina Campbell, associate professor of law at the University of District Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, said her path to law was “by no means direct.” “I pursued other programs after I graduated from Saint Mary’s,” she said. “Ultimately, I knew I wanted to be active in social justice and a law degree is a great tool for instigating social change. I was an idealist hoping to change the world through law.” MaryBeth Wilkinson, assistant general counsel of Owens-Illinois, Inc. said she joined law for the sole reason of “making money.””I grew up on a small farm in Michigan and wanted a ticket out,” Wilkinson said. “I joined law to make money, but over the years I have developed a strong passion for litigation. Litigation is like a war-zone or a game. I love being a part of this game.” Horvath said she truly loves her job working in insurance defense and litigation. “Not only do I work in a family friendly place where I can balance my family and my job, but I love going into work and knowing I am taking a burden away from other individuals,” she said. “When someone passes away in the family or a business needs to be passed down, a lot of people do not know what to do. I am there for those people, and it is truly rewarding.” Campbell said she became better equipped to tackle the challenges associated with working in an adversarial profession because of the challenges she overcame as a woman beginning work as a lawyer.     “The law profession, litigation in particular, is very adversarial. You really need to have tough skin and not let little criticisms bother you,” Campbell said. “I often look back on my career as a young female lawyer and think about how my gender was actually an advantage. People underestimated me and it turned out to work in my favor.” The panelists said women have made significant strides in the legal field.  Wilkinson said she believes the legal profession asks its lawyers to handle great responsibility. “Law is one of the most powerful positions you can be in, especially for women,” she said. “As a lawyer and as a professional, all you really have is your reputation. You can’t fake integrity and you can’t fake ethics.” Wilkinson said the two most important assets to have when pursuing any profession – not only law – are integrity and passion for the job. “Know yourself inside and out,” Campbell said. “My Saint Mary’s liberal arts education prepared me for the real world because I was well aware of my own personal values. With these values I could then start a career in immigration law that I now love.” Horvath said students should begin to search for opportunities now. “We are here to help facilitate your pursuits,” she said. “Don’t be afraid to speak up and take advantage of the different opportunities this college has to offer. We all cannot repeat enough that we are here for you. We want to see you succeed.” Saint Mary’s alumnae in the legal profession advised students interested in law about how best to pursue a career the field in a panel discussion Tuesday night.The panel, titled “Women in Law: The Lawyer Alumnae Panel” featured three alumnae from all different sectors of the field.last_img read more

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Music professors tour Asia

first_imgThree Notre Dame music professors will spend the next two weeks on a tour of East Asia, offering performances and information sessions in an effort to recruit prospective students and raise the profile of the department of music.From Oct. 7 to 19, professor of music Peter Smith, assistant professional specialist Tricia Park and associate professor of music John Blacklow will visit high schools and various institutions in Seoul, South Korea, and in Shanghai and Beijing, China, according to a University press release.Smith, who also chairs the department of music and specializes in music theory, said this tour not only aims to recruit musically talented students and bring attention to Notre Dame’s “outstanding” department of music but also to strengthen connections with the University’s alumni network in Asia through a variety of lectures, masterclasses and recitals.The team will focus its recruitment on 10 high schools in the three major Asian cities, Smith said.“We will offer musical performances, masterclasses and information sessions about the music department and Notre Dame in general,” Smith said. “A masterclass is a learning experience in which one student performs for the faculty member … the teacher then offers instruction to the student but frames the advice in such a way that it will be … beneficial to the larger group as well.”In addition to visiting schools, the professors will perform and teach at “significant” cultural and academic institutions, Smith said. Park, a violinist, and Blacklow, a pianist, will feature prominently in the performance events.“The three of us will offer … [a] lecture and recital at the Capital Library in Beijing, in an event jointly hosted by the Library and the U.S. Embassy, designed to foster cultural exchange,” he said. “We will also visit Beijing University — the Harvard of China — where I will teach a seminar on musical romanticism and my colleagues Tricia Park and John Blacklow will … perform a full-length formal recital.”In Shanghai and Beijing, the professors will also participate in “Discover ND” informational sessions, Smith said.“I will offer an introduction, followed by a performance by professors Park and Blacklow, and then we will break into smaller groups to answer questions for prospective students and their families,” he said.Smith said these information sessions reach a wider range of students and family members interested in Notre Dame, not just the “musically inclined.”“But the musical performance is a special attraction, given the interest and value placed on Western classical music in Asia,” he said.In Asia, both American education and musical instruction are held in high esteem, making the continent an ideal place to recruit international students, Smith said.“There is a strong interest … in sending their best and brightest students to study in America,” Smith said. “In addition to the high academic standards … the Asian educational system places great emphasis on the study of music and Western classical music in particular.”Blacklow said there is a more mainstream appreciation of classical music in the continent, and cites his experiences as a performer.“… On some of my own previous concert tours to Korea and Japan, it would not be uncommon to have full audiences in large concert halls, which is much more rare over here,” he said. “I think this results in a population who develop a serious knowledge and love for classical music, which translates into talented performers who are eager to pursue music seriously, whether as a performer or a scholar.”Notre Dame’s department of music has much to offer prospective students, Smith said.“[We have] a first-rate faculty, first of all, with leading experts in both music scholarship and music performance,” he said.Blacklow said Notre Dame’s well-rounded approach is vital to a performer’s musical development and also allows the student to pursue other fields of interest.“Advanced knowledge of theory and history will make a performer play with the needed conviction and understanding — and serious study of an instrument provides a foundation for knowing music ‘from the inside out,’ as it were,” he said. “It is also beneficial that so many students are able to double-major here. Our most serious students go on to graduate school themselves, but we have also taught many wonderful musicians who choose to go on to other fields.”Smith said compared with other schools, Notre Dame’s program is successful in offering instruction in both music theory and practice.“Many liberal arts programs stress music scholarship more heavily, while many schools of music place a greater priority on performance — the music department at Notre Dame strikes a balance.”Tags: Asia, Beijing, China, Department of Music, Music, Seoul, Shanghai, South Korealast_img read more

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