Category: arkiuqeuu

Ice age linked to plant growth

first_imgResearch by scientists from Oxford and Exeter universities, published this week, has shed new light on the cause of a series of ice ages that affected the earth 475 million years ago. Until now, it has been assumed that global cooling began 200 to 300 million years ago with the emergence of large plants with large rooting systems. This new research reveals a significant change in climate occurring 100 million years earlier in the Ordovician Period (488-444 million years ago), due to the emergence of the first land plants.Where a rise in carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere causes an increase in temperature, a decrease results in the cooling of the climate. Scientists claim that the interaction of the first land plants with rocks resulted in a significant decrease in the carbon dioxide levels due to silicate weathering – the process by which mosses extract nutrients from rock formations by dissolving them with acid, leading to carbon dioxide reacting with the rocks and being removed from the atmosphere. The expansion of non-vascular plants (mosses) around 475 million years ago may therefore have accelerated this chemical weathering, causing a fall in atmospheric carbon dioxide and triggering formation of the polar ice caps.Professor Liam Dolan from University of Oxford Department of Plant Sciences, one of scientists involved in the research, told Cherwell, “The most important message is that the invasion of the land by plants, a pivotal time in the history of the planet, brought about huge climate changes. It should also remind us that the removal of large areas of the world’s vegetation, which act as carbon stores, will increase atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and cause dramatic climate change.”Third year Earth Scientist Tom Phelan commented, “Currently climate change is a global problem and scientific research into previous climatic events is not only important for the scientific community but also for the global community.” He added, “The recent discovery is important as it is clear evidence for the world to see that deforestation and removing plants from the Earth’s surface is only going to enhance the rate of climate change.”Timothy Lenton from Exeter University, who headed the team of researchers, added, “Although plants are still cooling the Earth’s climate by reducing the atmospheric carbon levels, they cannot keep up with the speed of today’s human-induced climate change. It would take millions of years for plants to remove current carbon emissions from the atmosphere.”last_img read more

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Gun Bills Die In Senate And House, But Could Be Resurrected

first_imgGun bills die in Senate and House but could be resurrectedMarch 5, 2018  By Abrahm Hurt and Quinn FitzgeraldTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS—Legislation that would have allowed guns in a church with a school on the property appeared to all but die in the Indiana House.On Thursday—the House deadline for bills to be amended—Senate Bill 33 was not called down for discussion by either the sponsor, Rep. Mike Speedy, or House Speaker Brian Bosma, both Indianapolis Republicans.But Bosma was not ready to bury the bill, saying he was looking for another vehicle for the gun legislation.House Speaker Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis. Photo by Bryan Wells, TheStatehouseFile.com“There’s still two weeks,” he said. “I wouldn’t call it a decision at this point, but we’re just talking about options.”Current law bars guns on school property but SB 33 aimed to change that by allowing gun owners to carry the weapon when attending worship, working or volunteering for the affiliated church.When asked if he was avoiding voting on controversial topics, Bosma said that was not the case.“We’re trying to make smart public policy for Hoosiers and that isn’t always by voting on every amendment that somebody can dream up and throw up in the second house on second reading on the last day,” he said.The bill had 19 amendments that ranged from banning bump stocks on assault rifles to one that would bar the state from regulating firearms, ammunition and their accessories.Rep. Carrie Hamilton, D-Indianapolis, who authored the bump stock amendment, said she was hoping that the legislature could have had a conversation about gun regulation.“A majority of Americans support common-sense measures to reduce gun violence,” she said. “On behalf of my constituents, I have to stand here to express my disappointment that we couldn’t have this conversation, that we couldn’t debate and vote on reasonable measures.”Just two weeks ago, a gunman entered a Florida high school and opened fire, killing 17 people and injuring dozens more. The events have sparked debate at both the state and federal level about the availability of guns and whether they should be more tightly regulated.In the Senate, House Bill 1424, which that would have dropped licensing fees for lifetime gun permits, failed did not get a hearing in the Appropriations Committee, meaning that it, too, could be dead.President Pro Tem David Long, R-Fort Wayne. Photo by Emily Ketterer, TheStatehouseFile.comBut Senate President Pro Tem David Long, R-Fort Wayne, left open the possibility that some legislation might advance this session.“We’ll try to focus on what’s doable and what’s not,” Long said.In answer to a question, Long said he was not avoiding debate, but the issue has become very political.“I think people are saying let’s just calm down and move what was originally intended and not start debating any big possible issues under the sun regarding guns because that’s exactly what happens in these moments,” he said.When asked about what he would like to see in conference committee regarding gun regulation, Long said he would have to wait and see what happens. Conference committees are where differences between House and Senate versions of the legislation have to be resolved. It is also where legislation that has apparently failed can be revived by being included in bills that have passed both chambers.“I think there’s some consensus surrounding the permit issue as maybe as far as waiving a fee or something along those lines,” Long said. “Beyond that, it’d be hard to say if anything else is appropriate particularly given the mood of the state and the country right now.”FOOTNOTE: Abrahm Hurt and Quinn Fitzgerald are reporters for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.Print Friendly, PDF & EmailFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Court Ruling in Limbo, States Carry on Toward EPA Clean Power Plan Goals

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Annalee Grant for SNL:Several power utilities have expressed relief that they will have more time to consider the future of generation resources while the Clean Power Plan is on hold, but for the most part planning for a lower carbon future will continue regardless of the Supreme Court’s recent stay of the rule.The Clean Power Plan established statewide carbon dioxide emission standards for existing fossil fuel-fired electric generating units with the goal of cutting CO2 emissions 32% as measured from a 2005 baseline by 2030. The Supreme Court on Feb. 9 stayed the rule in an unprecedented decision that surprised many in the industry because a lower court has yet to rule on the merits of the underlying appeal. The carbon rule could be unenforceable for several more years as the earliest the high court is likely to hear the case, if it decides to do so at all, is in 2017.Many utilities have pledged to work with the states in which they operate, regardless of whether those states choose to comply with the rule’s requirements voluntarily. Others touted emissions reductions and a transition to cleaner, more efficient resources that is already underway in the power sector.Moody’s believes the stay will provide additional “breathing room” for coal-fired generators to consider retirement or refueling decisions, but a survey of several large utilities suggests that few, if any, retirement decisions will be reconsidered in light of the recent court action.According to S&P Global Market Intelligence data, around 68 power plants so far are scheduled to retire between 2016 and 2019, but some are too small to be subject to the Clean Power Plan and many are closing for reasons other than the carbon rule.Full article ($): Utilities expect little change to coal fleet decisions with carbon rule on hold Court Ruling in Limbo, States Carry on Toward EPA Clean Power Plan Goalslast_img read more

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N. Amityville Shooting Leaves 1 Dead, 3 Injured

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police homicide squad detectives are investigating an early-morning shooting Saturday in North Amityville that killed one person and injured two others, police said.Police responded to 66 Coolidge Avenue at 2 a.m. after receiving 911 calls and a Shot Spotter notification alerting authorities to gunfire at that location, police said. It appeared a fight broke out and then multiple shots were fired, police said.Three men were transported to local hospitals for gunshot wounds and a fourth was hospitalized for injuries he sustained during the fight. One of the gunshot victims was pronounced dead at the hospital, police said. The other injuries are considered non-life-threatening, police said.Police identified the man who was killed as Louis Wilson, 44, of Kansas City, Missouri. There was no information about the shooter.Police said the investigation is continuing. Anyone with information is asked to call the Homicide Squad at 631-852-6392 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS.last_img read more

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PR Insight: 3 simple ways to corner the market on millennials

first_imgYou’ve read countless articles about millennials, and you’ll probably read countless more. People are quick to discuss the need to embrace millennials by constantly sharing the latest data that follows millennial trends, as if the generation were an endangered species—which for some credit unions may be true. As a millennial who specializes in credit union communications, let me say one thing: It’s time to drop the formulas and get practical.As products of a digital revolution, millennials interact with thousands of Facebook friends and Instagram followers, fostering connections with peers, celebrities and influencers far outside of our normal social circle. The amazing, yet overwhelming nature of having thousands of friends worldwide—some of whom we don’t even really know—leaves us searching for a sense of community. Farm-to-table, local companies and membership organizations are being reinvigorated by a demand for more authentic and personal relationships. It’s a demand that credit unions are uniquely positioned to meet, if they don’t over-complicate the strategy.Millennials are pushing towards simplicity, searching for direct, straightforward and personal communication—especially in regard to our financial health. We want digitally accessible features, but not complete self-service. We want to have conversations, to know with whom we’re speaking, and to be provided with guidance and resources that are relevant to our stage of life. 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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IMO: World Expects Bold Goals on Cutting Emissions from Shipping

first_imgThe whole world would be watching the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in 2018, looking for something of real substance when it comes to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping, IMO’s Secretary-General Kitack Lim pointed out.“Next year really will be a time when the world will expect IMO Member States to deliver a clear vision as the first stage of the approved roadmap. I urge you, be bold; set ambitious goals that really will make a difference. You have a real opportunity here to do something of lasting significance. Make the most of it,” Lim said while speaking at the 30th Assembly session at IMO Headquarters in London.IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) is set to adopt an initial GHG strategy in April 2018.More than 1,500 delegates from IMO Member States, international governmental and non-governmental organizations have registered to attend the session that meets from November 27 to December 6.Lim outlined the key elements of the new “Strategic Plan for the Organization” for 2018 to 2023, which is expected to be adopted by the Assembly.“The seven strategic directions point us now towards more effective rule-making and implementation processes by integrating new and advancing technology to respond to our challenges, among others, to increase ship safety, including addressing new emerging technologies such as autonomous vessels, our contribution to combat climate change, engagement in ocean governance, mitigation of cyber-crimes, and facilitation of international trade, whilst continuing to take due consideration on the human element factor,” Lim said.The rapidly increasing pace of change in every sphere raised a fundamental issue, since technology will move far quicker than the regulatory process, he added.“Digital disruption will arrive in the shipping world very soon; and, when it does, IMO must be ready,” Lim said. “For me, this means the regulatory framework for shipping must be based firmly around goals and functions rather than prescriptive solutions. This is the only way to ensure that measures adopted by IMO are not rendered obsolete by the time-lag between adoption and entry-into-force.”The IMO as a whole needed to become more effective, more nimble and more adaptive, Lim pointed out, drawing attention to his determination to push forward a “Knowledge based Organization” concept, embracing data in the Secretariat’s work and in the decision-making processes.“For IMO, we need to have more detailed and deeper analysis of statistics and data so that we can really understand underlying trends and causal factors behind shipping casualties; and we must make sure that additions and amendments to the regulatory framework are also based, wherever possible, on relevant statistics, studies and analysis. This would pave the way for better regulation, one that not only takes into account the work carried out to reduce administrative burdens, but to avoid disproportionate requirements, as well as addressing obsolete and unnecessary ones,” he noted.IMO’s work to support the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the associated Sustainable Development Goals was also stressed.last_img read more

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New York College to Offer Offshore Wind Training Programs

first_imgThe State University of New York (SUNY) Maritime College has received USD 230,000 from the New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s office to promote offshore energy workforce development and training programs in New York.The grant funding supports the creation of an Offshore Energy Center which will offer training programs for wind-operations technicians, dynamic positioning training and certification courses for offshore vessel operators.The center’s courses will be offered on campus and online, to make the courses accessible to students, working professionals and others.”This center will assist our nation’s push to renewable energy,” said Capt. Eric Johansson, professor of Marine Transportation at Maritime College. “New York State is working diligently to ensure that offshore wind is developed in the most responsible and cost-effective way possible. Maritime College is proud to support that effort.”SUNY Maritime College received the funding as part of a USD 15 million state investment and the first phase of the state’s Climate Jobs NY, a component of the Clean Climate Careers initiative established last year.The first American offshore wind farm, the 30MW Block Island Wind Farm, opened in 2017 in Rhode Island and more are expected to be built in coming years, increasing the demand for a highly trained wind workforce.The State of New York has established a goal of developing 2.4GW of offshore wind capacity by 2030. The New York State Offshore Wind Master Plan will guide the state in reaching this goal, with the first auction for some 800MW of offshore wind capacity expected to be announced in the fourth quarter of 2018.last_img read more

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IMCA North Star Series opens with three Memorial Weekend dates

first_imgSLAYTON, Minn. (May 18) – Murray County Speedway hosts first-night action when the IMCA North Star Touring Series opens with three events during the Memorial holiday weekend.The fourth annual tour is at Slayton on Friday, May 22; at Arlington Raceway on Saturday, May 23; and at Redwood Speedway in Redwood Falls on Sunday, May 24.IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modifieds, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars, Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods, IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks and Mach-1 Sport Compacts are in action each evening.Pit gates and the grandstand open at 5 p.m. at Murray County. Racing follows 7:15 p.m. hot laps. Spectator admission is $10 for adults, $6 for students ages 11-15 and free for kids 10 and under when accompanying a paid adult.More information is available by calling 507 220-3511 and at the www.murraycountyspeedway.net website.Arlington also makes up features, including the Sprint Series of Minnesota event, rained out last weekend. Pit gates open at 2:30 p.m. and the grandstand opens at 3:30 p.m. Hot laps are at 4:45 p.m. and racing starts at 6 p.m. Grandstand admission is $12 for adults, $5 for kids and free for five and under.The track website is www.arlingtonraceway.com. Information is also available by calling 507 380-6998.Redwood Speedway opens the pits at 4 p.m. and the grandstand at 5 p.m. Hot laps are at 5:30 p.m. with racing to follow. Admission for spectators is $12 for adults, $8 for teenagers and free for kids 12 and under when accompanying a paid adult.More information is available at www.redwoodspeedway.com.Pit passes are $25 each evening. All three tracks will also post updates on Facebook.The series was originally scheduled to open May 14 at Kossuth County Speedway in Algona, Iowa. That program was postponed due to weather and will now be held June 4.IMCA Late Models also run that evening, for IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing national and All­star Performance state points.Select North Star Touring Series events will be broadcast through IMCA.TV this year.last_img read more

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Ireland stun Windies in opener

first_img Ireland’s 100 came up in the 19th over and the century stand for the second wicket was the next milestone, reached with a Joyce boundary. The former Middlesex and Sussex man was dropped in the 27th over, Bravo getting a hand to the ball on the long leg boundary but seeing it slip from his grasp and over the rope. Joyce’s 50 came up in the following over, off 39 balls – but the 106-run partnership ended soon after when Stirling was caught behind off Samuels, with Ireland 177 for two in the 28th over. Stirling’s effort spanned 84 deliveries and contained three sixes and nine fours. Joyce was joined by O’Brien and the pair made good progress until the former departed for 84, off 67 balls and including two sixes and 10 fours, when he was caught by Bravo. That dismissal, at 273 for three and in the 40th over, sparked a mini-collapse as four Ireland wickets fell for 18 runs. Andy Balbirnie was caught by Bravo for a run-a-ball nine, Gary Wilson found Chris Gayle and was on his way for a single – giving Jerome Taylor a third scalp – then Kevin O’Brien was then run out without scoring. However his brother Niall ensured the wobble did not develop into anything more serious, seeing Ireland home. O’Brien finished unbeaten on 79, from 60 deliveries including 11 boundaries, while John Mooney (six not out) was with him as the target was reached. Next up for Ireland is a match against United Arab Emirates in Brisbane on February 25, while Pakistan await the West Indies in Christchurch on Friday. The West Indies, put into bat, totalled 3 04 for seven from 50 overs, with a 154-run partnership for the sixth wicket between Lendl Simmons (102) and Darren Sammy (89) the highlight of their innings. However, Paul Stirling (92), Ed Joyce (84) and Niall O’Brien (79 not out) impressed with the bat to ensure victory for Ireland, who wobbled as they neared their target but got over the line with 25 balls to spare. Ireland have won their opening World Cup match, defeating the West Indies by four wickets in their Pool B match in Nelson. Press Association The West Indies were uninspiring with the bat until Simmons and Sammy came together at 87 for five in the 24th over . Chris Gayle hit 36 from 65 balls and Dwayne Smith (18), Darren Bravo (nought), Marlon Samuels (21) and Denesh Ramdin (one) all struggled to make an impression – with George Dockrell taking three wickets for 50 runs. However, the run rate improved notably when Simmons and Sammy were at the crease – the pair shared in a stand of 154 in 127 deliveries, with the final 20 overs producing 198 runs. Sammy became the sixth wicket to fall when, in the 44th over, he holed out to Dockrell. His 89 runs came from 67 balls and contained four sixes and nine fours. That dismissal brought Andre Russell to the crease and he maintained the momentum in the closing stages of the innings, hitting an unbeaten 27 off 13 balls. Simmons brought up his team’s 300 with two balls of the innings remaining but his innings ended with the next ball. Dockrell again provided the catch as the Trinidadian’s innings ended on 102, from 84 balls and containing five sixes and nine fours. Ireland started brightly with their run chase, with captain William Porterfield and Stirling putting on 71 for the first wicket. Porterfield fell for 23 when he edged a Gayle delivery to Ramdin but Stirling looked in good form, moving to his half-century from 49 balls. last_img read more

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Bellew vows to end Haye’s career in December 17 rematch

first_imgLONDON, England (Reuters) – British heavyweight Tony Bellew has vowed to end the boxing career of former WBA world champion David Haye in their December rematch in London.The pair will meet on December 17 at the O2, the same arena where Bellew beat Haye in March.“I’ll be victorious and end Haye’s career. Another loss to me closes the curtain on the Hayemaker,” former WBC cruiserweight world champion Bellew told the BBC after the date was confirmed.Haye, 36, was fined £25 000 ($32 000) for his conduct in the build-up to the previous fight, with intense news conferences and heated trash-talk between the big men.Bellew stopped Haye, who had suffered an Achilles tendon injury, in the 11th round of their first fight.“Bellew somehow won the lottery in our first fight, but believe me, he won’t win the lottery twice,” declared Haye on Friday.(Reporting by Alan Baldwin, editing by Toby Davis)last_img read more

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