Category: nztllnmjo

Oxford to London in 57 Minutes

first_imgFrom December 9th, travel time between Oxford and London will rapidly fall as commuters find themselves with a new, high-speed route.The service will come as a welcome to commuters, seeing journey times cut by 15 minutes on earlier services, and up to 50 minutes later on in the day. The knock-on benefits include increased train services between Didcot Parkway and Paddington being increased at busy times of the day.The first trains will depart at 6:03am and arrive around 7am, seating 282 people, with the number rising to 515 by February.last_img

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Raising money for autism awareness

first_img× BAYONNE — The Bayonne Chamber of Commerce is partnering with two of Bayonne’s most popular hair salons to raise money for Autism Awareness: About You Salon and Haircutting Plus. They urge you to call for an appointment. A portion of their proceeds from this fundraiser, which lasts throughout the month of April, will benefit UCP of Hudson County, which serves individuals with all developmental disabilities, throughout all of northern New Jersey.UCP specializes in serving individuals with severe behavior issues as well as those with extensive medical needs. It also provides in-home respite services for families with children with autism throughout Bayonne and the rest of the county.Please call the salons directly. ‘About You Salon is at 180 Broadway, (201) 455-5090, and Haircutting Plus is at 680 Broadway, (201) 858-1611. Donations may also be made through the Bayonne Chamber of Commerce website: www.bayonnechamber.org/eventslast_img read more

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Greggs pledges free school meals in first sustainability plan

first_imgSource: GreggsGreggs has vowed to support 1,000 school breakfast clubs and provide 70,000 free meals each school day by 2025.The target is one of 10 commitments set out in the company’s first full sustainability plan, making up the ‘Greggs pledge’.The food-to-go retailer said the commitments focus on “stronger, healthier communities, a safer planet and better business” as these areas “align with [its] values and where it believes it can make the most difference”.As well as the pledge on free school meals, Greggs has set the following commitments for 2025:· A 25% reduction in food waste from 2018 levels and continuing to work towards 100% of surplus food going to those most in need· 50 Greggs outlets providing affordable food in areas of social deprivation, with a share of profits given to local community organisations· 30% of the items on Greggs’ shelves representing healthier choices and attracting customers through education and promotions· Working towards carbon neutrality by using 100% renewable energy across all of its operations· 25% of Greggs shops featuring elements from its Eco-Shop store of the future design· The use of 25% less packaging, by weight, than in 2019, with any remaining packaging made from material that is widely recycled· Greggs’ workforce reflecting the communities it serves in terms of diversity· A robust responsible sourcing strategy in place and reporting annually on progress towards its targets· Securing and maintaining Tier 1 in the BBFAW Animal Welfare standard.“As a modern business it is our duty to stand for more than just profit, and our history shows that we are doing exactly that. We have a proud reputation of giving back to our people, suppliers and communities, and we know that more can be done to change the world for the better,” said Roger Whiteside, chief executive officer at Greggs.“The Greggs pledge sets out our commitments as we continue giving back to the communities that support us and take less from the environment that we all reply on. We look forward to reporting on our progress.”last_img read more

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Pigeons Playing Ping Pong Unveil Phase Two Of Domefest Lineup

first_imgBeloved jam group Pigeons Playing Ping Pong will return with their annual event, Domefest, from May 18-20, 2017 at Fort Royale Farm in Bedford, PA. The host band will not only headline and play four sets over the weekend, but they’ve put together a lineup filled with jam scene favorites. In addition to previously announced Consider The Source, Aqueous (x2), Electric Love Machine (x2), Broccoli Samurai, The Fritz, Swift Technique, phase two has added The Main Squeeze, lespecial, G-Nome Project, Vibe & Direct, Litz, Flux Capacitor, and many more.“We’re so proud of this year’s lineup,” said Greg Ormont, co-producer of Domefest and singer of Pigeons Playing Ping Pong. “Not only are all the bands incredible musicians, but they’re also great people. Vibes will be off the charts this year!”The full Domefest lineup can be seen below, and you can head to the festival’s website for details about the festival, tickets, and more information.[Cover photo by Phierce Photo by Keith Griner]last_img read more

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Global initiative chair explains mission

first_imgTim Phillips, chair and co-founder of the global initiative Beyond Conflict, spoke about his experience working with leaders around the world for over two decades in the Eck Hall of Law Tuesday evening.Beyond Conflict began in 1992 to facilitate discourse between societies divided in conflict, focusing on the human element of conflict and the experiences of other leaders transitioning to peace. Phillips said his network includes 75 initiatives in more than 22 countries in regions like the Middle East, Latin America, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, South Africa and Northern Ireland.“What we do is find the relevant experiences around the world to bring and share with leaders at all levels,” Phillips said. “We describe leaders as not just political elites. Civil society, grassroots, anybody that exercises leadership in a society — we engage them.“We assist leaders in divided societies struggling with conflict, reconciliation and societal change by facilitating direct contact with leaders who have successfully addressed similar challenges in other settings.”Phillips said Beyond Conflict’s method of resolving conflict in those societies is grounded in three rather basic, but perhaps undervalued principles: people can learn from the experiences of others; people can change; and seeing that others can change is empowering. Phillips said these three principles are powerful, even on a natural, biological level.“People don’t respond to the legacy of repression, violence and trauma with their national identity card. They respond as humans” Phillips said. “Of course, every country will have their own unique experience, but when people respond to trauma and loss of agency, these are human experiences.”Phillips said despite national, cultural or religious differences, his global network focuses on serving the universal experience of tragedy.“The DNA of our organization is this recognition of shared human experience. That doesn’t say that every situation is analogous and alike. But again, people respond as humans. Culture, ethnicity, race and ideology center of this operating system called the human brain.”Phillips said Beyond Conflict’s work has taught him valuable lessons for approaching future projects in the same vein. He said since the initiative’s birth, important themes within peace building include confronting dictatorship and victimhood, recognizing the need for change, changing paradigms and mindsets and building trust among enemies.“Inclusion is the basis of sustainable change,” Phillips said. “The flip side of that is exclusion is the main driver conflict, in my view. People need to be acknowledge as how they see themselves and understanding is more important than trust.”Tags: Beyond Conflict, Eck Hall of Lawlast_img read more

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Aslan explores religious identities, Islam and ISIS

first_imgMichael Yu | The Observer Reza Aslan speaks in the Jordan Auditorium of the Mendoza College of Business on Thursday night.“You are, according to the FBI statistics, more likely to die from faulty furniture, than to be killed by a terrorist. You are more likely, in this country, to be shot by a toddler than killed by a terrorist,” Aslan said. “However, we cannot dismiss this fear by calling it irrational, we must recognize it and we must confront it.”According to Aslan, one percent of Americans identify themselves as Islamic, while 73 percent of American’s identify as Christian. The prominence of a religion in any state makes it easier to dissociate violent acts with religion, he said.“We live in a country where, according to the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, 73 percent of [people] consider themselves Christians,” Aslan said. “When you live in any kind of society where you are surrounded by Christianity in all its diversity, it becomes very easy to dismiss fringe versions of Christianity.“It is much easier to disconnect that behavior with the religion of Christianity. When we see acts that represent the fringe of Islam, as we are not familiar with normative Islam, we are unable to dissociate it with the religion.”According to Aslan, there are two typical responses to Islamic extremism; the first is “Islam is not like that,” and the second is, “Islam is exactly like that.” However, Aslan said both these answers are incorrect.“I understand the impulse of any community of faith when confronted with extremists to say ‘that is not us,’” Aslan said. “But this is wrong. It is incorrect because a Muslim is whoever he or she says is a Muslim. Those who act violent in the name of Islam — we must take that seriously.”Aslan emphasized that all religions have violent fringe groups. He credits this to the rise of religious nationalism around the world. According to Aslan, the failure of secular nationalism led to this religious nationalism.Aslan also made a distinction between Islamism and Jihadism. He noted that these terms are often used interchangeably, there is a remarkable difference between them. Aslan defined Islamism, as a type of religious nationalism, that most contained within the borders of a pre-determined state.In contrast, he defined Jihadism is transnational, yet anti-national. According to Aslan, Jihadists do not want to create an Islamic State, Jihadists want to rid the world of states in general, and re-organize the global as a single world order under their control.“There is a fundamental misunderstanding of what we mean when we say religious. We get caught in this polarization,” Aslan said. “Religion, it’s important to recognize, is not just an order of belief and practices. Religion, above all us, is a matter of identity.“It’s about how you are, how you identify yourself in an indeterminate world,” Aslan said. “It is not a faith statement; it is an identity statement.”Tags: Dean’s Fellows, ISIS, Reza Aslan According to Reza Aslan, more than 49 percent of American’s are scared of becoming a victim of terrorism.Aslan, an internationally acclaimed writer and scholar of religions, spoke on campus yesterday in a lecture titled “Islam and ISIS” hosted by the Dean’s Fellows of the College of Arts and Letters. The lecture, in which Aslan tackled the topics of religion and violent extremism, attracted to many students that there were more than four filled overflow rooms to accommodate those who would not fit in the Jordan Auditorium in Mendoza.last_img read more

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Institute for Sustainable Communities Launches $4 million U.S.-China Partnership

first_imgInstitute for Sustainable Communities Launches $4 million U.S.-China Partnership Chinese government delegation will visit Vermont on October 20to tour energy-efficient facilities and sign an agreement with ISC.ISC’s program will reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions in Guangdong province, China’s ‘Factory to the World.’Montpelier, Vermont, October 20, 2008- Officials from the Guangdong Economic and Trade Commission are in Vermont today to sign an agreement with the Institute for Sustainable Communities, which has launched a $4 million U.S.-China partnership to reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions in the southern province of Guangdong.Leveraging the best resources and expertise from the United States and China, ISC’s Guangdong Environmental Partnership is designed to increase energy efficiency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve environmental health in the heavily industrial province. The program works at four levels-business, government, communities, and schools-to spark a wave of change in environmental and energy-efficiency practices. It is supported by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, GE Foundation, Citi Foundation, SABIC Innovative Plastics, Honeywell Corporation, and the U.S. Agency for International Development, through a public-private partnership.”The Guangdong Economic and Trade Commission is pleased to be working with the Institute for Sustainable Communities on this important partnership,” said Bi Zhijian, vice director general of the commission. “Addressing environmental challenges and reducing energy intensity levels are important priorities for the Guangdong government and, while we are making progress in addressing these issues, we welcome international cooperation and assistance.”Often called the factory to the world, Guangdong province is the same geographic size as New England with seven times the population (100 million-about 2.5 times more people than California). The region has more manufacturing jobs than the United States and its factories make a significant contribution to global green house gas emissions, acid rain, and other pollutants. The region, which suffers from frequent energy shortages, has made a significant commitment to improving energy efficiency.”This is precisely the kind of partnership-working across sectors, disciplines and nations to address the critical sustainable development challenges of our time-that I envisioned when I established ISC in 1991,” said Madeleine Kunin, the former governor of Vermont. “We are proud to leverage Vermont’s leadership and energy expertise in the global arena.”The Chinese delegation will spend two days in Vermont meeting with organizations and agencies involved in various energy efficiency programs, including Efficiency Vermont, Burlington Electric, and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters. The delegation will also visit Canada, New York City, and Miami, Florida.”If the world is going to make any progress in improving resource efficiency, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and minimizing climate disruptions,” said George Hamilton, president of the Institute for Sustainable Communities, “nonprofits, agencies, universities, and businesses from the U.S. and China must work together more effectively.” He added, “I look forward to achieving some very exciting results with the Guangdong Economic and Trade Commission and all of our U.S. and Chinese partners.”The delegation is led by Bi Zhijian, vice director general of the Guangdong Economic and Trade Commission (GETC), and includes Xie Shichao, director of the Department of Environment & Resource Conservation at GETC; Huang Xiaoqun, director of Guangdong State Tax Bureau; Zhang Na, vice-section chief, Department of Environment and Resource Conservation; Li Bianzhuo, president, Guangdong Association of Resources Comprehensive Utilization; and Wang Cailian, vice-director, Guangdong Energy Saving & Circular Economy Promotion Center.*Founded in 1991 by former Vermont governor Madeleine M. Kunin, the Institute for Sustainable Communities has managed 70 projects in 18 countries. ISC, which is led by George Hamilton, brings 18 years of experience in helping communities address major challenges. ISC’s China program consists of four mutually reinforcing components:BUSINESS: Environmental Health and Safety Academy. Based at Lingnan University College of Sun Yat-Sen University, the new academy will provide affordable, state-of-the-art training designed to save energy, reduce harmful emissions, and improve worker health and a safety conditions in Guangdong’s manufacturing enterprises. It will expand the pool of qualified EHS managers serving factories in Guangdong province and South China.GOVERNMENT: Environmental Governance. ISC is working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to provide technical assistance and training to regional and local environmental authorities on strategies to encourage more effective monitoring and compliance — as they staff up to manage a number of new laws and regulations.COMMUNITIES: Community-Based Energy Efficiency. ISC is working with three demonstration municipal districts and townships to demonstrate how communities can design and implement comprehensive energy efficiency program – with a particular emphasis on public facilities and small factories.SCHOOLS: Education for Sustainable Development. Working in local schools, ISC is developing courses on resource efficiency and environmental health for children ages 9-13-and involving the public, community and business leaders, and education administrators in their hands-on learning. Partners include South China Normal University, Vermont’s Shelburne Farms and LEAF in Japan.###last_img read more

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Brazil Supports Demining Actions In Colombian Territory

first_imgBy Andréa Barretto / Diálogo November 21, 2019 Colombia is one of the most contaminated country with antipersonnel mines, resulting in more than 11,000 victims since 1990, according to the Colombian government’s Office of the High Commissioner for Peace.As of September 30, 2019, 356 Colombian municipalities were declared cleared of antipersonnel mines with the destruction or neutralization of 6,870 explosive devices. However, a lot more work still lies ahead. Multinational teams are conducting ongoing demining activities in another 189 locations in Colombia. Brazil is one of the nations that participate in this humanitarian mission to free Colombian territories.“The contamination of areas by antipersonnel mines causes various political, environmental, social, and economic impacts to a country,” said Brazilian Marine Corps Colonel Dalton Araújo de Barros, head of the Inter-American Monitors Group of the Organization of American States’ Assistance Mission, headquartered in Bogotá, Colombia. “Brazil is a crucial contributor to reach the goals of Colombia’s Comprehensive Action Plan against Antipersonnel Mines.”Brazil’s contribution to the process of decontamination in Colombia began in 2006. Currently, there are 20 Brazilian service members in Colombia, eight from the Marine Corps and 12 from the Brazilian Army (EB, in Portuguese).The main role of Brazilian service members is to train and guide teams who deactivate mines in the fields, and to later evaluate the work done. “Our goal is to increase safety, reduce the number of accidents with antipersonnel mines and improvised explosive devices, fast-tracking humanitarian demining,” said EB’s Public Affairs Office.According to Col. Dalton, Colombian antipersonnel mines are unique “because they are improvised and typically manufactured from plastic, glass, or metal materials to kill, hurt, or harm people.” This characteristic requires additional precautions during the demining process.The contribution of Brazilian service members consists of training and guiding the teams who work in the field to identify and deactivate explosive devices throughout Colombia. (Photo: Brazilian Navy)HistoryExplosive artifacts, strewn throughout Colombia, are a legacy of the 50-year war between the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC, in Spanish) and the government.In 2004, within the framework of the Ottawa Convention, Colombia initiated clearing operations on its territory. The convention, created in 1997 and signed by more than 150 countries, prohibits the use, storage, production, or transfer of antipersonnel mines, and seeks the destruction of this type of weapon.Following the 2016 peace agreement signed with the FARC, efforts to clear up thousands of existing mines in Colombia have ramped up with the aim to free the country of landmines by 2021. In July 2019, the Colombian Office of the High Commissioner for Peace said that the country now struggles with artifacts that illegal armed groups (such as the National Liberation Army and the Clan del Golfo) have newly planted in an attempt to protect their coca crops.Although Brazil does not have antipersonnel mines on its territory, the Brazilian teams have acquired experience through their work in missions to remove antipersonnel mines in the Americas since the 1990s, Col. Dalton said. “We participated in operations led by the Organization of American States in partner nations such as Peru, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Colombia,” he said.last_img read more

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3Rivers keeps rolling

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr 3Rivers FCU ($1.0B, Fort Wayne, IN) has learned to go with the flow, successfully making a mark in its marketplace by being what a lot of the people need most of the time.“You can’t be all things to all people, but we also don’t have the luxury of specializing in one area and hitting it hard at the expense of other things,” says Don Cates, who joined 3Rivers in 2011 and became its president and CEO a year later. “Instead, we concentrate on being diverse and consistent. That’s worked well for us.”Cates took the helm of a financial cooperative in a market with flat population growth and stiff competition. And in the midst of the Great Recession. The population still isn’t growing much in and around Fort Wayne, Indiana, but 3Rivers has. continue reading »last_img read more

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Why most millennials don’t go a week without Venmo

first_imgTwo years ago, I refused to use Venmo.Today, I don’t go a week without it. Most weeks actually involve five to six Venmo transactions.My personal change in thinking reflects what many credit union and bank marketers will find when marketing to millennials and their tech-native successors, Generation Z: convenience is everything.A recent FIS study found that 72 percent of all banking interactions today are digital, with millennials carrying the majority of that lead. Global Web Index says 68 percent of millennials prefer their mobile phone as their most important piece of technology, with nearly all online millennials owning a smartphone. Millennials want constant on-the-go access.I’ll be the first to admit I don’t fit most millennial stereotypes. I still keep my budget on an Excel spreadsheet and would prefer a personal life without social media. So, when Venmo came on the scene a few years ago, I didn’t want anything to do with it. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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